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October 14, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-14

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Michigan

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FAIRNESS INELEUTI
REQ1IRES EQUAL LWBI

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XIV, No. 13.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

PRICE FIVE

x 1 .. . ,___ . _ __.._____ _-_ . ___.._ f

VARSITY MEN
SCORE THRICE.
IN HARD TILT
Mead leturns to Scrimmage, Playing
Fulback For Regulars Who
Have Tussle With
Reserves.
SCRUB! NEARLY SCORE ON
FO]WARD PASSES OVER GOAL
Gault NlH Be Out of Rough Work For
Or a Week, Being Badly
Injured.
Scrinnage on Monday, a rare oc-
currenc at Ferry field, was yester-
day's pgram in which the Varsity
second Arng men scored three touch-

FRESHMAN TENNIS PLAYERS
PLAN FOR SPRING PRACTICE
More than 50 tennis racquet wield-
ers met last night in the trophy room
of Waterman gymnasium for the pur-
pose of organizing and laying plans
for the spring session.
In short talksĀ° given by Ex-Captain
Andrews, Dr. Lee, John Switzer and
Director Rowe, the youngsters were
urged to take advantage of, the fall
weather and make use of the two
courts that have been set aside for
them. Willis Broadhead was elected
manager but it was decided not to
choose a captain until the caliber of
the players could be more accurately
determined.
The spring tryouts are to be con-
ducted in the form of an elimination
tournament, and of the last six re-
maining, Dr. Lee will pick four as a
representative team.
BASEBALL COACH
VISITS ANN ARBOR,
Carl L. Lundgren, Rickey's Successor,
Stops Over to Look up Team's j
Prospects.
RECOMMENDED BY FITZPATRICK,

PADEREWSKI TO
nPEN PHnRAI

SUNION CONCERT

Famous Pianist to Appear Next Week,
Matzenauer and Philadelphia
Orchestra to Follow
Before Holidays.
RESERVED SEATS WILL BE
PUT ON SALE THIS MORNING
Concert on January 23, Will Include
Choral Union and Two
Noted Soloists.
The Choral Union series will be
opened on October 22 by Ignace Pader-
ewski, the famous pianist, who has oc-
cupied a unique place in the musical
world and continues to fill it with ac-
customed brilliancy. He is the one
pianist who, like Patti in the vocal
world, seemed to obtain an extraordi-
nary hold on the masses. As Pader-
ewski has not been heard in Ann Ar-
bor for twenty years,his coming should
be a particular treat.
The second concert, November 12;

ANNOUNCE MEN
MANAGERSHIPS
Candidates Appointed to Run for Ath-
letic Association Offices
Are to Refrain From
Electioneering.
BRUCE-HULBERT PLAN OF
CAMPAIGNING TO BE USED
Baseball, Track Managers and Assist-
ants to Be Chosen on
Saturday.
Nominations for the posts of 1914

Facts Concerning

11

1. Offices for men-Dr.H.H.Cum-
inings, 723 Church street, tel-
ephone 1349-L. Dr. C. B.
Stouffer, old homeopathic
building, university exchange
telephone.
2. Office for women-Dr. L. C.
Pratt, telephone 233-J, hours
by appointment in Barbour
gymnasium.
3. All services free.
* * * * * * * , ,*

nfirmary.

It

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t ,

BAND PROBLEM
TO BE SETTLED
THIS MORNIN
lirector Bairtelnie, Professor Whiti
and a Student Council Member
to Decide Fate of Organiza-
tion Today.
QUESTION OF CONTROL STILL
OFFERS MOST DIFFICULTI
Club to Consist of 40 Pieces, Thi]
Receiving Moietary Rewlard,
Ten to Remain Tryouts.
A committee of three men, with f
powers to act, consisting of Direci
P.G. Bartelme, Prof. A.S. Whitney ani
member of the student council, to
appointed, will meet this morning

Twelve Students Take Rhodes Exam.
Twelve students, including four
from Hope College, Holland, Mich.,
will take the examinations for the
Rhodes scholarship which will be con-
ducted by Professor Winters, at 10:00
o'clock this morning, in room 102 uni-
versity hall.

downs a the scrubs.
Mead' return to scrimmage for the
first tim since he fractured his ankle
precedig the Case game was the fea-
ture of tie afternoon. His return was
doubly velcome since Gault's injury
has prced more serious than at first
supposd. Gault will be unable to
return o rough work until after the
M. A. t game.
The oach did not send in a single
man wo took part in the ,Mount Un-
ion gale, merely giving them the us-
ual wckout and chasing them to the
clubhase. As the scrubs put up a
great .ght the coach had an excellent
opporinity to look over the men who
are figting for a regular place on the
Varsit.
The scrubs started out to make
troub3, rushing the 'ball to the two
yard ine in five minutes. End runs
by Lvidson and Cohan, and a for-
ward pass from Davidson to Staatz
gavethe scrubs the ball on the five
yardline but a fumble on the two yard
linegave Mead an opportunity to punt
out
'lie kick was high and short and
Cohn fell on it on the two yard line,
bu a forward pass from Davidson
wd* dropped on the Varsity goal line,
ani the scrubs were on the defensive
fren then on.
recovering from their stage fright,
(Continued on page 4.)
XN-RBER OF LIFE MEMBERS
GROWS IN UNION CAMPAIGN
Life members of the Michigan Union
-imber 343. Of these 91 have complet-
,d the payment of the membership
lee, while 252 are participating life
members. The life roll includes 14
students who are in school at present.
Patrick Duffy Koontz, '14, is the only
life member who has signed up this
year.
Active membership reached 2,540
last night while at this time last year
but 2,030 men were registered.
TO HOLD WELCOME
DINNER' TOMORROW,

r
t
1

Carl L. Lundgren, who will succeed
Branch Rickey as Varsity baseball
coach, was on Ferry field yesterday
afternoon looking over the Wolver-
ine prospects on his way to Detroit.
Lundgren is a football man as well as
a baseball player, having occupied the
positions of half and fullback on the
University of Illinois eleven. How-
ever, it is as a pitcher for the Illinois
school that the new coach is best
known here.
Entering that institution in 1898,
Lundgren pitched for four years dur-
ing the period when baseball rivalry
between his school and Michigan was
at its height. Lundgren has pitched
several games on Feryr field and was
favorably impressed with the many
improvements which have since been
made on the Wolverine battlefield.
Lundgren captained the team in
1902, his last year; and was recom-
mended to the Chicago National
League team by Coach Huff. For sev-
en seasons the new Michigan coach
was with the Cubs, pitching for them
in the days when the Chicago aggre-
gation reached its greatest perfection,
and won two world championship ti-
ties.,
Since then Lundgren has coached
the Princeton All-Fresh two years,
and it was oni the recommendation of
Keene Fitzpatrick, the old Wolverine
trainer, that the Illinois star was se-
cured to take Rickey's place.
Lundgren merely stopped over in
Ann Arbor yesterday, and will not re-
turn until some time in February,
when indoor baseball work will begin.
Meanwhile he will remain at his home
in Marengo, Illinois.
WILSON VICTOR IN
CUP TOURNAMENTl

will introduce Margeurite Matzenaeur,
one of the greatest contraltos in the
world. , For years Matzenauer was
looked upon as one of Europe's best,
and it was not until two years ago that
the Metropolitan Opera Company was
able to engage her for New Yoik,where
she made an instantaneous success.
The directors of the University Musical
Society were at once anxious to have
Matzenauer appear in Ann Arbor, but
it was not until this summer that it
was found possible to make satisfac-
tory arrangements.
On December 9 the Philadelphia Or-
chestra of 95 men under the leader-
ship of Leopold SBokowski will ap-
pear. This organization ranks as one
of the few really great orchestras in
the United States, while its leader,
though still a young man, is recognized
as an eminent conductor.
Of unusual interest will be the con-
cert to be given January 23, involving,
as it does, the combined efforts of the
Choral Union, two soloists of note,
Madame Lucile Stevenson, soprano,
and Marion Green, baritone, and the
use of the great organ in Hill Auditori-
um. '
The last of the pre-festival series
will take place February 18, when Carl
Flesch, the distinguished Hungarian
violinist will appear. Mr. Flesch has
never appeared before in America, but
in Europe he has been recognized as
one of the two or three great violinists
-in fact many consider him equal to
the celebrated Ysaye.
The sale of reserved seat tickets
for the Choral Union concerts will be-
gin this morning at the university
school of music. At that time choice
of seats in Hlil auditorium will be of-
fered to the public by exchanging
their course tickets,'and paying a res-
ervation fee of $1.00. On Thursday
the price will be reduced to 75 cents;
on Saturday the reduction will be to
50 cents;. and on and after Monday,
October 20, the price will be further
reduced to 25 cents. These tickets
are not reserved for the May Festival,<
but must be exchanged for other tick-1
ets later in the year, in accordancea
with the usual plan.I

baseball and track managers and as-
sistants, made by the board of direc-
tors of the athletic association at a
session held Saturday morning, were
made public yesterday afternoon fol-
lowing another meeting at which the
final arrangements to govern the elec-
tion were determined upon.
Under the new system which has
been adopted, four men have been
chosen as candidates for the positions
of assistants to the two managers.
Besides choosing the manager two
assistants are to be elected, each voter
being instructed to cast his ballot for
two assistants to both the baseball
and track manager. The election for
manager next year will be held with
these two assistants as the candidates.
It is the opinion expressed by mem-
bers of the association directorate that
under this 'system a more competent
man will eventually be chosen and
that more effective work can be done
by the -men themselves.
The members of the board of direc-
tors last night stated that the new sys-
tein had been adopted primarily for
the purpose of making the positions
competitive in nature. They also stat-
ed that should any of the candidates
be found guilty of participation in
active political solicitation, for votes
that such action would lay them open,
to disbarment by the directorate.
The annual election of the baseball
and track managers and their assist-
ants is to be held on Saturday in room
18 of University hall between the
hours of 8:00 o'clock in the morning
and 2:00 o'clock in the afternoon. Ac-
cording to the regulations for the
election, issued last night by athlet-
ic association officials, every student
on the campus is eligible to vote. Bal-
lots are to be cast following the pre-
sentation of the proper slip, to be
designated soon by the athletic asso-
ciation, clipped from the year book.
According to an announcementl
made last night by former president
Harold Hulbert of the student coun-
cil, the four candidates for the posi-
tions of managers are to meet with the
elections committee of the council at
the Michigan Union on Tuesday even-
ign at 7:00 o'clock. At that time the
question of the publication of plat-
forms under the new Bruce-Hulbert
plan of election campaigns will be dis-
cussed.
Nominations are as follows:
For baseball manager: Walter Em-
mons, Herbert Muckley; assistants:
Chester H. Lang, Ralph F. Khuen
Percy .Crane, E. R. Hazen; track man-
ager: Gordon Eldredge, Charles Ar-
thur Crowe; assistants: Victor Pin-
nell, Beresford Palmer, Lyle Harris,
Emmett F. Connely.

TO LIMIT OUTSIDE
WORK OF WOMEN
Campus Activites to Be Restricted
According to a System of
Points.
LOW STANDINGS REDUCE RIGHTS
Beginning this semester women will
be restricted in the number of campus
activities in which they participate..
All activities are tabulated,each count-
ing a specific numbei of points, of
which no woman may carry more than
10 at one time or more than 12 points
a semester. Card index files will be
kept of all the women taking part in
campus affairs, so that no infringe-
ment of rules will occur.
No women who has received two D's
or one E the preceding semester may
carry over five points of outside work.
A standing lower than this will allow
the student to carry one point. Al-
though eligible women may carry 12
points a semester, no one is allowed
more than 22 points for one scholas-
tic year.
Activities once undertaken and re-
corded may be exchanged for others;
with the permission of Dean Myra B.
Jordan and the organization from
which the woman wishes to resign.
The card index record is to be in
charge of three women students and
a member of the non-athletic commit-
tee, and shall be under the direct al--
thority of the entire non-athletic com-
mittee.
The object oif the women's league in
adopting this plan is threefold: to
more evenly distribute' the honors of
the campus, to more efficiently fill the
offices, and to raise the scholarship
average of league members.
Listed at the top of the scheme is
the presidency of the women's league,
which counts seven points, followed
by the class vice-presidencies at six
points. The leading woman's part in
the Comedy club is rated at four
points, other activities decreasing in
proportionate value.
BIG Y.I. C. A. MAN TO SPEAK
TO WOMEN THIS AFTERNOON
A. J. Elliott, international secretary
of the middle-western section of the
Y. M. C. A., familiarly known as "Dad"
will speak to the women of the uni-
versity in Newberry hall at 5:00
o'clock this afternoon. His address,
"The College Quitter," delivered at;
the University of Iowa and the Uni-
versity of Kansas recently, was en-
thusiastically received.""
Members of the Y. M. C. cabinet and
specially invited guests will attend a
banquet in his honor at 7:00 o'clock. 1

settle once for all the fate of the uni-
versity band.
In brief the plan submitted by the
student council provides for a paid
and uniformed band. which will attend
every Saturday afternoon athletic con-
test on Ferry field, every indoor track
meet at which any other college is a
contestant and all mass meetings pre-
ceding such contests. The band will
consist of 40 pieces, thirty receiving
actual monetary remuneration and the
remaining ten to be kept as tryouts.
The forty men will be chosen by a
committee consisting of two council-
men, one member.of the old band and
the band director.
The mpst radical change, 'however,
lies in the attempt to secure a direct
control of the band. It is proposed
that a student "who will be in no
other way connected with the band,
be appointed as manager, and whose
duties will be to have charge of all
funds, engage a director, manage the
activities of the band and make a
financial report to the auditor and
comptroller of university organiza-
tions."
This step is opposed most strongly
by Ike Fisher the contemplated direct-
or of the reorganized band. According
to Mr. Fisher the new plan will only
serve to keep alive the inefficiency
which has marked the control of the
band in former years. Real control
he says should be centered in one man
who will take up the work year after
year and who can devote his whole
time to the work. To have an under-
graduate in charge, who would hold
office only for one year, would keep
the organization in a state of contin-
ual unrest. Aside from this he fears
that the position, when once obtained,
would be looked upon solely as a col-
lege honor, and receive the accompa-
nying lack of attention and work.
His remedy for this is to have a res-
ident faculty member appointed, who
will sign binding contracts with the
men who are appointed to the band,
and who will take personal charge of
(Continued on page 4.)
UNION BOAT CLUB
PICKS OFFICERS
Officers and committeemen of the
Michigan Union Boat club for 1913-14
were chosen at a meeting at the Union
Sunday morning. Henry S. Parsons,
'15E, was picked for commodore, the
chief executive office. The following
men were appointed on the, commo-
dore's committee which directs the
administratiion of the club: Harold S.
Hulbert, '14M, K. S. Baxter, '15E, C. C
Mills, '14, . S. Dickinson, '13'15L, E.
G. Kemp, '12-'14L, and E. H. Saer,'
'1 3-15L.
The other officers and committees
were chosen as follows: vice commo-
dore, W. S. Davidson, '15; vice-com-
modore's committed, H. B. Little, '15E,
G. A. Webber, '16, Gleed Miller, '14,
A. R. Griffes, '15E R. A. Hill, '14E,
and D. H. Willia is, '16; secretary,
P. H. Middleditch, '15E; secretary's
committee, D. R. Ballentine, and J. R.
Darnell, '16; treasurer, H. G. Gault,
'15; treasurer's committee, W. EReid
'16E, and Edmund Marth, '17E; first
ensign, J. C. Abbott, '15E; first en-
(Continued on page 4.)

Tickets for the first Michigan Union-
membership dinner to be held at 5:30 Under ideal weather conditions and
tomorrow night are being rapidly dis. with Ferry field courts in splendid
posed of. The .committee plans to shape, E. C. Wilson, captain of the
accommodate 200 in the large dining tennis team, yesterday won the varsity
room. The remaining tickets may be championship and the honor of having
obtained at the Union desk or from his name engraved first on the silver
members of the committee. loving cup recently presented by Re-
The function will be called a "Wel- gent Comstock to the athletic associ-
come Dinner" and has been planned ation.
especially for first yearbmen. Presi- The final match brought out the
dent Harry B. Hutchins will be the best tennis pf the toprnament. Both
principal speaker and Selden Dickin- men started in top form and the first
son, president of the Union will act as eight games were evenly contested,
toastmaster. nearly a11 going to deuce. By rushing
Prof. James P. Bird and Harold S. to the net and placing his overhead
Hulbert, '14M, will give short talks shots well, Shafroth out-generaled the
and Arthur Cohen, '14L, has promised captain and finally broke through his
a monologue. Mr. J. R. Hayden, in- service, taking the set at 6-4.
structor in the political science de- In the second set matters were re-
partment, will furnish the vocal mu- versed. Shafroth fought gamely and
sic. made some seemingly impossible re-
The dinner will celebrate "Michigan turns, but was unable to handle con=.
Day" which Capt. Inman Sealby, '12E sistently Wilson's speedy shots. He,
is trying to establish. Many alumni lost the set 6-4,
organizations already hold their reg- The third set was a long drawn out
ular Wednesday luncheons and by affair and was finally won by Wilsoni
holding the membership diners on at 11-9. Shafroth's vain efforts to
Wednesday, Capt. Sealby believes that handle Wilson's clever service in this
the custom may he more quickly set tired him greatly, and Wilson had]
founded. no trouble in taking the final set, 6-1.

YPSI THROWS OUT CLUTCH
& HOLDS SPEED AT NORMAL
No more will the fair damsels of normal authorities, believing that the

Ypsilanti trip the fantastic steps un-
known to the eagle eyed chaperones.
No more will they shake the festive
foot and the erstwhile pensive pedal
extremity to the seductive strains of a
hidden orchestra with the knowledge
that their revolutions. convolutions,
and fantastic gyrations are creating a
whirl of obfuscity in the minds of the
watchers. No more will the perspir-
ing and eager student expostulate,
"Oh, but we were dancing it correctly.
It was danced just that way. at Big
Harbor and Newport."
The drastic blow has fallen. The

chaperones, ignorant of the proper
steps which compose the modish danc-
es, are unable to decide when they are
being danced within the limiting
bonds, have engaged a profesio al
tango teacher to instruct them in the
maze of slides, glides, hops and stran-
gle holds. I
Perhaps, when the course of in-J
struction is finished and the chap-
erones have learned to evade the full
nelson and clutch hold, there will
arise from the deserted partners of
the feminine sex, the cry, "Chaperon,,
chaperone; who's got the chaperone?"

DAMM SALOON CASE WILL BE
BROUGHT TO TRIAL TOMORROW
The case of Lawrence J. Damm vs.
People, which was continued over
from last Tuesday, will come up for
trial in the circuit court before Judge
Kinne, tomorrow morning at 9:00
o'clock. Damm was arrested last
May for selling liquor to James H.
Minzey, '16, in violation of the state
law against selling liquor to students.
Colonel Kirk, of Ypsilanti will rep-
resent the defendant and Prosecutor
George Burke will appear for the
state.

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