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April 18, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

ici

an

Daily

T

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1914.

PRICE

w_
__ _'

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Weekly Membership dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Webster-Al ha Nu preliminaries, room
3, law building, 8:00 o'clock.
Michigan-Alma baseball game, Ferry
field, 2:00 o'clock.

SUNDAY'S MEETING'
TO BE BIG AFFAIR
J. Campbell White, of New York, to Be
Principal Speaker at
Gathering

LELAND STANFORD
TENNIS MATCH OFF
Issue First Call for Tryouts Monday;
27 Courts Available For
Matches
1914 TENNIS SCHEDULE IS HARD

MICHIGAN INTERSCHOLASTIC
TOO BIG FOR OFFICIAL MEET
Large dumber of Outside Schools
'VlMelh Compete, Make TRating of
State Schools Impossible

OVERWHELMI
VOTE DEFEI

I

DETROIT

QUARTET WILL

SING

I'

TRIP

EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Dr. Charles E. Jefferson speaks at -the
Methodist church, 10:30 o'clock.
Dr. H. M. Sheffer speaks before Me-
norah society, Newberry hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Rabbi David Lefkowitz speaks before
Jewish Students Congregation, Or-
pheum theater, 7:00 o'clock.
Fifty-Sixth Annual Meeting of S. C. A.,
Hill. auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.

Final arrangements for the "Go to The anticipated tennis match be-

Officially1

the

Michigan's interscholastic meet has
grown to be of such importance that
teams from as far east as West Virgin-
ia, and as far west as Illinois now
compete in it. A large number of
Illinois, Ohio and Indiana teams are
always entered, and for this reason
the Ann Arbor meet is not the official
state meet, as the standing of the
Michigan schools cannot be determin-
ed.

to the J-F
of general
ben A receivinr

ption to Be Like J-Hop
reception will be similar
;, according to the plans
iairman R. D. Wiley, '14E.
ine composed of the deans
uts and other prominent
a grand march, dancing
till be the order of events.
I DEBATERS,
PRELIMINARY,

Hill Auditorium Sunday" meeting have
nearly been completed and when the
last detail is settled a program for one
of the biggest, if not the biggest, re-
ligious meetings ever held in Ann Ar-
bor will have been outlined.
J. Campbell White, of New York,
General Secretary of the Laymen's
Missionary Movement, which raises
millions of dollars yearly to conduct
religious work in this country and
abroad, will be the principal speaker
at the gathering. President-Emeritus
James B. Angell will offer prayer.
Prof. James P. Bird, of the engineering
department, will also give a shorttalk.
A quartet, from Detroit, under the
direction of Prof. William Howland, of
the school of music, will render sever-
al selections. Mr. A. R. Tyler, of De-
troit, and Prof. A. A. Stanley will play
the organ.
The plans for the financial campaign
for the Busrah mission have been fin-
ished and all is ready to make the start
for funds Monday morning. A supple-1
ment, in connection with the Sundayi
morning issue of The Michigan Daily,
will be edited and contributed by the1
Student's Christian Association and1
will tell full particulars relative to thet
foreign work.,
The meeting Sunday in Hill audito-
rium will mark the 56th annual meet--I
ing of the S. C. A., probably the oldest'
organization on the campus.I

tween Michigan and the Leland Stan-
ford University has fallen through and
the Californians will be unable to ap-
pear in Ann Arbor this year. Increas-
ed interest in tennis has caused Cap-
tain Wilson and the athletic authori-
ties to make an effort to secure an at-
traction in tennis for local enthusiasts,
and it is expected that one of the local
college teams will appear here. Cor-
nell planned to make a Western in-
vasion but failed to secure a schedule
with teams in this section.
Captain Wilson has issued his first
call for Varsity tennis candidates for
Monday, when all of the 27 courts on
Ferry field will be available for the
preliminary sets. The number of ten-
nis tryouts is expected to be unusu-
ally large this year.
A sheet will be posted near the
courts and every aspirant 'will be
obliged to register. Candidates will be
at liberty to arrange matches with any
of the listed men and the result of
their sets is to be sent to Captain Wil-
son.
The schedule for the team this year
is difficult and in order to have the
best possible men meet the EasternE
cracks, representing Yale, Pennsylva-1
nia, Georgetown, Navy, and others,
Captain Wilson has arranged for twoc
practice matches with the Detroit and1
Toledo Tennis clubs. Seven of -the
best men will be selected to compete
against this organization.t

For that reason, the Michigan School-
masters have endorsed the interscho-
lastic held in East Lansing as the offi-
cial state meet, for only high schools
of Michigan are allowed to compete
there. The local meet was encouraged
by resolution, however, at the present
session of the pedagogues.
The university prefers to have teams
from all over the country compete,
than to limit the affair to state institu-
tions. It is believed to be a broader
policy, by the athletic authorities, and
to be more beneficial to Varsity athlet-
ics, as more high school stars become
acquainted with the university,
RELAY MEN WILL
HOLD RACE TODAY

i11 and

3
a
C

LAWMEMO
Class Stands Firm Against I
After Stirring Speecht
Pres. Robert $.
Curry
THIRDI r1EETING FAILS I
CHANGE OPINION 0
Motion to Postpone Definite A
Gift Until Next Month
Defeated
For a third time, by a vote
16, the senior law class deci

The Adelphi Cup debating team com-
gren
too posed of Victor Sugar, '15, Harry G.
split Gault, '15, and N. E. Pinney, '16, de-
t the feated the Jeffersonian team, which
was represented by J. T. Sloan, '15L,
'res- W. J. Goodwin, '16L, and W. M. Bruck-
e as ner, '16L, in the first inter-society
nas- preliminary held last night, and will
aame be one of the two teams to compete in
eas- the final Cup debate which is to be

aintance
ed in th
hance a
ions ar

y held before the Oratorical association
.t in University Hall on May 5.
- Webster and Alpha Nu will meet to-
,f 1night ii;, a secondprelimnary Cup de-
, bate, the winner of which will com-
e pete with the Adelphis in the final.
t A. J. Mickelson, '16L, P. G. Egar, '16L,,
e and D. W. Ogilbee, '16L, have been
chosen to represent the Websters,while
01 E. J. Engle, '14, M. C. Briggs, '14, and
n L. J. Fries, '15, will make up the Alpha
Nu team.
, The question to be decided is: Re-
, solved: "That immigration should be'
r further restricted." The debate will
be held at 8:00 o'clock in room B of
r the law building. Admission is free.

JlAVANS WILL MEET FRESH
BASEBAALL.ASPIRANTS TODAY
Coach "Johnny" Lavans of the All-
Fresh baseball team arrived from his
home in Grand Rapids late yesterday
and was disappointed in not having
proteges out before today. Lavans is
anxious to get his host started and has
issued orders that every candidate for
the All-Fresh team report to him this
afternoon at south Ferry field imme-
diately following the.game with Alma.
ENGINEER EXHIBIT PROGRESSES

will start at 2:0(
ma team catches ar
lineups follow:
hy cf, Howard 1b
r p and If, Benton rf
3b, Baer or Hipple
'ibeau p.
)n 3b, Voght of
ss, McCloy cf or p
rf, Peacock If, Green
vick or Besgatoor p

Miniature

Skyscraper and Model of
Summer Camp to
Be Shown.

.

I Formulate Plans Today
,from nearly every frater-
y and house club will meet
g at 9:00 o'clock at the
a Phi house to make final
ying coal on a cooperative
e coming winter. If the
ks feasible this morning,
will be made to add sta-
s to the list of salable
hould Report at the Gym
e May and assistants are
the post-gym season
aminations of freshmen.
sts will not be so extensive
ast fall, they will measure
r improvement of fresh-
hat time. Dr. May desires
immediately at Waterman
for examination.
opolitan Student on Sale
opolitan Student for April
sale at State street and
;ands. The frontispiece is
sident-Emeritus James B.
contributes an article on
ication for the Far East,
ms are by Edwin D. Mead,
he World Peace Founda-
James A. Macdonald, ed-
Toronto Globe, both of
in Ann Arbor last year.

MUSICAL CLUBS RECEIVED
WELL IN SALT LAKE CITY
According to the press reports from
Salt Lake City the concert of the Mu-
sical clubs in that city was most en-
thusiastically received. In spite of
the fact-that the audience was compos-
ed of "bmparatively few Michigan
graduate the performers were greet-
ed with round after round of applause.
The clubs succeeded on, merit alone
and not on sentiment.
Waldo Fellows was the individual
star and the newspaper critics were
practically unanimous in prophesying
him a uccessful stage career if he
should choose to follow the profession.
SAFETY ON RIVER WILL BE
TOPIC AT COMBINED ME1ETI NG
At a meeting of several members of
the Michigan Union boat club and rep-
resentatives of the university health
service to be4 held on Sunday morn-1
ing, plans will be discussed relative to.
improving the safety methods now in
use on the Huron river. While the ex-
act nature of the plans is still unan-
nounced, officers of the health service
say that stringent efforts will be made
in an effort to prevent the annual list
of fatalities that has occurred for some
years past.
Announcement of the plans adopted
at the meeting will probably be made
the first of next week.r

Special features will be numerous at
the annual engineering exhibit to be
held May 14 and 15. The department
of civil engineering will show in the
structural display, a model twelve sto-
ry steel building, complete in every
detail, copied from the chamber of
commerce building in New York city.
Actual working models of all the dif-
ferent machines used in highway con-
struction will be shown, along with
cross sections of 7 or 8 kinds of roads.
The sanitary department will show
a cross section of slow sand filter, with
actual working sedimentation basins.
A model of the engineering summer
camp will be displayed by the survey-
ing department, while the hydraulic
engineers will offer a miniature har-
bor, along with many pictures of hy-
draulic work. Concrete bridges and
steel works together with railroad
equipment will be on display. In the
naval tank a life boat which rights and
bails itself after being overturned, will
be exhibited.
All engineering sessions will be dis-
missed during the two days of the ex-
hibit, which will extend from 9:00
o'clock i4 the morning until 11:00
o'clock at night.
No Visitors' Night at Observatory
In regard to the suggestion that the
observatory have a weekly visitors'
night, Prof. Hussey, of that depart-
ment, states that the large enrollment
in the astronomy classes prevents any
such arrangement.

PROFESSOR HUSSEY REPORTS
FAVORABLY ON LA PLATTE
Prof. W. J. Hussey, head of the as-
tr6noniy department, who has been
visiting Mr. P. T. Delavan, '12, head
of the La Platte observatory in South
America has returned, and declares
that observatory to be the best equip-
ped institution of its kind in the south-
ern hemisphere. The southern observ-
atory has recently begun the tremen-
dous task of cataloguing the stars in
that zone, a work which will take sev-
eral years to complete, as 25000 obser-
vations are necessary, 5000 of which
have already been made.
Progress on the Lamont Telescopb,
which has been held up for some time
due to the trouble of finding a glass
suitable for the order, will be resumed
in the near future, as Prof. Hussey has
received word that the desired glass
has been found. The telescope, on
completition, will be shipped to Ar-
gentina, to be used in the LaPlatte
observatory.
CLASS BASEBALL TEAMS TO
BEGIN GAMES NEXT WEEK
Taking advantage of the warm
weather the junior lit, junior dent, and
fresh law baseball teams appeared on
south Ferry field for the initial prac-
tice of the season. About 20 men are
expected to turn out for the first year
laws, and a larger number is looked
for from the gay class in the lit de-
partment. So far the dent team has
been.confining its activities to battery
work but next week will see the whole
squad in action. Thirteen other teams
have entered and will begin their prac-
tice work in accordance with a sched-
ule which will start next week.
Freshman Laws to Dine Wednesday
The annual banquet of the fresh
law class will be held at the Union,;
Wednesday night, April 22. A program

I
,,
'
1
r
.j
2
t
f

Two relay teams composed of the
eight candidates for the two mile quar-
tet, that will represent Michigan at the
Penn games next week, will be pitted
against each other this afternoon on
Ferry field.
Contrary to predictions, Ilaff and
Jansen, the two fastest half-nilc:s c_.
the squad will run on the sanc tcamu,
but to offset this, their running mates
will be the two that have made the
poorest showing outdoors up to date.
Lamey will be one of these, and the
fourth man will be either Ufer or Fox.
The opposing team will be made up of
Brown, Murphy, JGriest and either Fox
or Ufer.
With the showing that the Wolver-
ine half-milers have made out doors
in the past week, their chances to win
the two mile event at the Penn carni-
val appear exceptionally good. There
are four men on the squad that are
covering the distance in less than two
minutes, and as last year's team broke
the record in eight minutes flat for
the two miles, Trainer Farrell is far
from displeased with the present out-
look. {
The races today will'start about 2:30
o'clock, and will be run during the
hall game, instead of as before as was
first planned.

terday not to leave a class memo;
to the law department, thereby bre
ing a tradition of 17 years standi
The action came after a stirring spe
by President Robert J. Curry, in wh
he pointed out, that a memorial gi'
now, when the class was diviid
would mean that the memorial wo
not be representative of the class.
The original voting down of a el
memorial was the outcome of a c
meeting some weeks past at which c
ly 32 members of the class were p
ent.. The second meeting held pr
ous to spring recess to reconsider1
former vote, also voted not to rec
sider the gift. At this tim. Presidi
Curry stated he was in favor of a n
morial but felt that a gift then woi
appear to be the effect of the alleg
coercion of The Michigan Daily,
C. F. Phillips, treasurer of the cla
offered a motion to postpone defin
action on the memorial and take it
the latter part of May, as he feltt
undivided feeling would then have si
sided and the class could vote a g
with combined forces. But this moti
was defeated.
The meeting was far from 'bel
peaceful. The members indulged
long parliamentary squabbles, dism
sions on points of procedure and t
lengthy speech of the president W
filled with bitter attacks on~The. Mic
igan Daily, for the attitude it uas .ta
en in the matter. He also stated tl
he felt the campus was backing t
seniors in their stand,. and in voti
the way they had done, they had co
out of the fray, victors. The Da
has refrained from editorial comme
since the former meeting, in an effo
to smooth over the alleged feeling
coercion.
Spokane Club Donates Loving CI
The Spokane club, at a smoker he
last night at the Union, decided to dl
nate a loving cup to the high schc
at Spokane, Wash., winning the debt
ing championship three times. T
aim of the local students in giving t
cup is to interest the high school st
dents of Spokane in Michigan, a;
since Michigan is a leader in debatir
it was decided to give the cup for tl
activity.
REHEARSALS FOR VEREIN
PLAY PROGRESS RAPIDI
With the cast rehearsing daily, "D
Professor als Kauffmann," the annu
Deutscher Verein play, ' is rapid
rounding into shape. The plot ce
ters around a German broker and 1
brother, a professor, who is somewh
jealpus of the broker's success -as
financier, and decides, himself, to t
a hand at investing. His total igno
anceof business methods nearly r
sults in his ruin, but owing to t
timely intervention of his brother, t
professo-r's venture proves a succes
Family harmony is further aided l
the love of the professor's nephew f
the broker's son.
Tickets for the play may be obtain
in 'room 204 U. H. every afterno4
from 2:00 to 4:00 o'clock,and at Sch
berle's music store on Main stre
next Wednesday from 2:00 to 5:
o'clock.

AVIATION MEET. CANCELLED
DUE TO SMASH-UP OF GLIDER
The Michigan-Cornell aviation meet,
which was scheduled to be held in
Ithaca some time next month, has been
cancelled, as the result of an accident
to the new glider which the Michigan
club has been building. The machine
had just been completed when the
smash-up occurred. L. C. Wilcoxen,
'16E, was up on a trial flight when a
wire broke, and the machine crashed
to the ground from a 25 foot height,
smashing it beyond repair.
This aviation meet would have been
the first intercollegiate contest in the
history of the flying game.
Judge W. L. Day, '00, Resigns Position
William L. Day, '00, United States
district judge for the northern division
of Ohio, has resigned his position and
declared his intention of entering the
law firm of Squire, Sanders and Demp-
sey. His resignation will take effect
May 1.

containing musical numbers by an or- Judge Day is president of the Michi-
chestra, and speeches by faculty and gan Alumni Association of Cleveland,
students has been arranged. Tickets and while in the university made a
for the six course dinner are now on record as a football and baseball play-
sale for $1.25, and may be obtained er. His father is Justice William R.
from members of the social commit- Day of the United States Supreme
tee. Court.

esleyan
d Lecture

I

Dr. Charles E. Jefferson WASORAROADWY Methodi
NEW YORK CITY ~SUNDAY

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