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April 17, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-04-17

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II

1

ichigan

al

y

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 17, 1914. IF

IALL
TLED
' BOARD

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Dixie club dance, Packard academy,
9:00 o'clock.
Round-up dance, Michigan Union, 8:30
o'clock.
Weekly Louuger, Michigan Union, 7:30
o'clock.

FOOTBALL SQUAD
GETS STIFF DRILL
Pontius Practices for Vanderbilt Job
by Directing Second Spring j
Workout

VARSITY DEFEATS'
RESERVES 10 TO 2
Ferguson Pitches Well For Regulars;
Poor Support is Costly to
Barlbeau

RECEIVE WORD OF DEATH OF
THOIAS SPENCER JEROdE,s'84
MI bigan Graduate Dies on Easter
Sunday, Leaving Unfinished
Mianuscripts

FILIPINOS P
PREPARED

Favors Senior law class meeting, room B, law
in building, 4:00 o'clock.

RAYNSFORD AND LYONS TRAIN TEAM IN READINESS FOR ALMA

i Months by
ego Men

S ARE NOT
'H RULES NOW
for Some Action
of Board

which has

lain

the table of the board in
thletics for about a year,
rought to the front Wed-
rnoon when the Detroit
clation adopted a resolu-
its endorsement.
tion follows:
That the board of control
at the University of Mich-
ested to so change their
bility rules as to permit,
etion of the eligibility
intercollegiate baseball
by any bona fide stu-
e University of Mich-
standing, not a freshman,
ve acquired a one year's
ion of Chairman Whitney,
, the matter will be defi-
d at a meeting of the
y, after the return of the
i from the eastern trip.
bers of the board yester-
ed themselves as dissat-
he present regulations of
college baseball players,
he men were not certain

Jeffersonian - Adelphi preliminaries,
room B, law building, 8:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROWI
Weekly Membership dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Webster-Alpha Nu preliminaries, room
B, law building, 8:00 o'clock.
COOPEBATIVE COAL BUYERS'
CILUB WILL 31EET TOMORROW1
The cooperative coal buyers' club,
whose purpose is to secure coal at
wholesale rates for fraternities and
house clubs, will hold a meeting at the
Alpha Sigma Phi house, 1315 Hill
street, tomorrow at 9:00 o'clock. At
this meeting definite prices will be
quoted.
Enough organizations have promis-
ed to purchase coal in this way to in-
sure a saving of about $1.00 per ton
on all kinds of coal, but definite prices
cannot be given out until after the
eetig tomorroUw.
SHELTON TO RULE
LUDINGTON CAMP

Yesterday's football practice looked
like the real thing, with Captain
Raynsford and "Johnny" Lyons of the
Varsity and a whole coterie of the 1913
scrubs and All-Fresh added to the
flock of rookies who responded to the
call for the first practice on Wednes-
day afternoon.
Lyons put in an appearance, a little
bit the worse for his long winter's lay-
off, but he showed no end of "pep" in
chasing down the field under the punts
sent away by Pontius. This veteran,
together with Torbet, had complete
charge of the work-out yesterday,
while Captain Raynsford constituted
himself a regular candidate, and work-
ed out with the rest of the footballers.
Pontius was out practicing for the
job he will be compelled to hold down
next fall when he coaches Tennessee
University, and he made a very good
imitation yesterday of a real gridiron
mentor in full action. Several of the;
"M" men, who will be eligible for the
1914 eleven, were present at the drillj
yesterday afternoon, but in citizen's
garb. They announced, however, that1
they would be out and ready for the1
coming of Yost. Cochran alone may
not be able to report until fall, pres-
sure of school work preventing his
donning the moleskins.
"Hub" Huebel, of the 1912 Varsity,t
was an interested spectator at thet
practice.
FOOTBALL STADIUM NEARLY
READY FOR CONCRETE WORK

southern trip took the field, with the
exception of Labodie for McQueen at
second. McQueen and Sisler were the
only veterans not out.
Ferguson's pitching featured the
contest, the lanky twirler holding the
recruits to two hits in four sessions
and whiffing five youngsters. Hippler
handled the slants of the tall hurler in
credible fashion.
Baribeau worked for the other nine.
In the first inning three hits netted
three runs, and in the fourth the Var-
sity bunched four hits for five runs.
Baribeau, although hard hit in these
two innings, was not responsible for
all the runs, Mattson twice dropping
the ball on plays at the plate. Bari-
beau failed to walk a man, but poor
support proved costly.
Howard, Benton, and Graham each
had two hits apiece, their drives being
responsible for most of the runs. La-
bodie was credited with two infield
hits, which completed the Varsity as-
sault. Baribeau and Maltby were the'
only men on the Reserves to connect
safely.
Quaintance worked the last inning
for each team. The Varsity collected
two tallies off his delivery.
On the whole, the Varsity looked
much stronger than on their last en-
gagement before leaving on the south-
ern trip, and should easily take the
season's opener from Alma Saturday.t
The score: ,

The Varsity easily defeated the Re-
serves, 10 to 2, yesterday afternoon
in the first game of the season on Fer-
ry field. The regular team used on the

Word has been received by cable-
gram of the death of Thomas Spencer
Jerome, '84, on Easter Sunday at Cap-
ri, Italy. Mr. Jerome, the only son of
Ex-governor Jerome, was born at Sag-
inaw, January 24, 1864. le studied
law at Michigan in 1885 and received
the degree of Master of Arts from H-ar-
vard in 1887.
Mr. Jerome attracted wide attention
through a course of lectures given in.
the American School of Classical Stud-
ies in Rome in which he criticised the
methods of Roman historians. He dem-
onstrated the baselessness, to some
extent, of the popular portrayal of the
Emperor Tiberius.
Mr. Jerome has had a permanent
residence in Capri since 1901, and has
devoted himself to a study and inves-
tigation of the history of the Roman
Empire, particularly the causes of its
decline. Until mail is received, it will
not be possible to tell how nearly fin-
ished are the volumes, upon which he
was engaged, and in which general in-
terest was shown by European and

Dean C. Worcester, I
Interior of Phi
Says the Isla

LECTURER GIVES ACCOUN
CONDITIONS AMONG
President.Emeritus James I
Introduces Speaker 4
Evening
"Responsible Filipinos w
something to lose do not de.
pendence, but wish the Islan
main under the administratic
United States," declared Dear
cester, ex-Secretary of the It
the Philippine Islands, whf
viewed yesterday. Referrin
statement of Manuel L. Guezo
the Philippine commissioners
ington, that the Filipinos det
mediate independence, he sa.
only the native politicians of
represented by Mr. Guezon
making this demand."
In his illustrated lecture in
ditorium last night, Mr. V
showed that although a tremer
vance in education, sanitatior
civilizing the wild tribes h,
place due to the efforts of 1
ernment, the Filipinos are i
being prepared to govern th
and need the help of our gov
Mr. Worcester gave an ent
account of his visits to the wi)
tain tribes, which were illust
stereoptican views and moti

IN[

American scholars.
Before taking up a permanent resi-
dence in Capri, Mr. Jerome served suc-
cessively as Counsel to the Transpor-
tation Committee at Havana and as
Consular Agent of the United States at
Sorrento, Italy.
TO HOLD PRE-CUPI
DEBATE CONTESTS
Inter-society preliminaries for the
Cup debate will be held between Jef-

7
3
;
1
{
f
"E

Captain George H. Shelton of the
29th infantry, U. S. A. has been ap-

7mmon
sity y
as fav

alone pointed officer in charge of. the Stu-
move- dent's Military Instruction camp to be
held at Ludington, Mich., this summer.
rities Captain Shelton is a former member
where, of the General Staff and is considered
istitu- one of the best fitted men in the army
ques- to conduct an instruction camp.
An interesting feature of the camp
is and will be the rifle-range shooting. Each
ester- student will be given his own rifle dur-
voring ing the camp session and will be in-
structed in its handling and use. To
those students making the necessary
qualifications, the National Rifle Asso-
KETS ciation offers its marksmanship badg-
es and also a trophy to be competed
n the for by the teams from the different in-
n has stitutions.
e, to Students will benefit by the fact that+
ickets the names of those whocomplete the
Mo- course of training will be kept on file
IoMa- at the War Department office with ref-
new erences to the efficiency and fitness ofi
Row- each for future command.

Working through rain and in mud,
Engineer Weeks' men in the past ten
days have completed most of the prep-
arations for the actual pouring of con-
crete for the superstructure of the
football stadium in Ferry field.
The foundation footings have been
finished, and forms for 28 columns at
the east end of the stand have been
erected, with their cross members. The
front retaining wall for one third the
length of the south section, and the en-
trance retaining wall have been built
to grade level.
Engineer Weeks is waiting to obtain
washed gravel in order to start work
on the columns proper. No gravel pits
are yet open, because of the frost in
the ground. Rain has hindered the
construction so much that the drainage
system of the stand has already been
installed to remove the water from
the ground in which work is being
done.

ase i]
pron
amitte
the d
k ago.
>rge l
of a
" by

1 2 3 4 5-*R H E
Varsity . .......3 0 5 0 2-10 8 3
Reserves ........1 0 1 0 0-2 2 2
Batteries-Ferguson,Quaintance and
Hippler; Baribeau, Quaintance, Matt-
son and Wyman.
PROF. G. F. WOODBERRY WILL
ADDRESS PHI BETA KAPPA
Prof. George F. Woodberry of Bos-
ton, Mass., has been secured to speak
before the members of Phi Beta Kappa
at their annual spring banquet. The
date of the banquet has not been defi-
nitely settled but it will probably be
held on the evening of May 8. At that
time members of the senior literary
class who are elected will be initiated
into the society.
The committee are at present look-
ing up the records and it is probible
that they will report on the names of
eligible candidates at the meeting of
the society which will be held the last
week of April.
DUAL AVIATION CLUB MEET
WITH CORNELL CALLED OFF

'
s
1
l
3
3
t
Y
c
i
t
i
,

fersonian and Adelphi tonight and be- tures
tween Webster and Alpha Nu tomor- Ang
row night at 8:00 o'clock in room B recei
of the law building.
The various cup debating teams as SEN]
selected by each society in tryouts D
last month are as follows: Jeffersoni-
an-J. T. Sloan, '15L, W. J. Goodwin, se:
'16L, and W. M. Bruckner, '16L; Aedel- custo
phi-Victor Sugar, '15, Harry G. Gault, wear
'15, and N. E. Pinney, '16; Webster- mene
A. J. Mickelson, '16L, P. G. Egar, '16L, stead
and D. W. Ogilbee, '16L; Alpha Nu- whic
E. J. Engle, '14, M. C. Briggs,.'14, and scho
L. J. Fries, '15. cours
A contest between the winners of the tor's
two inter-society preliminaries will be a six
held in University Hall on May 5. Ac- the r
cording to the rules of the Cup debate Th
the first society to win ten annual con- vet fo
tests will be awarded the cup. Adelphi will
is credited with eight victories, Web- ceive
ster with six, and Jeffersonian with scho
one. tasse

s. President-Emeritus J
ell, who introduced the
ved hearty applause.

d and
o1 by
1 of t
nal c<

Sylvester,

natio
cine.

aes will be Prof. and
and Prof. and Mrs. R.
h of the engineering
I Prof. and Mrs. S. L.
'. and Mrs. H. I. Lillie

"THROAT EPIDEMIC A THING
OF THE PAST," SAYS DOCTOR
A decrease of more than 50 per cent
in the number of persons coming to
the University health service for treat-
ment, has been noticed since the re-
opening of the university following
Easter vacation. Dr. H. H. Cummings,
head of the service, says that the epi-
demic of throat trouble is a thing of
the past.
The system of house-physicians in
all fraternities, sororities, and house
clubs, as well as rooming houses, is
being worked out in detail, at the pres-
ent time. Announcement of the plan
adopted will probably- be made next
week.
ZOOLOGY FACULTY' MEMBERS
TO SPEND SUMMER IN EAST
Prof. R. W. Hegner, Mr. Peter Okkel-
berg and Miss Alvalyn Woodward, all
of the zoology department, have ar-
ranged to spend the coming summer
at the Marine Biological Laboratory at
Wood's Hole, Mass., where they will
carry on extensive special investiga-
ions. Miss Woodward will leave about
the middle of May, and the others will
follow shortly after commencement.

FRESHMEN ENGINEERS FAVOR
ANNUAL CLASS FESTIVITY
Freshman engineers declared them-
selves unanimously in favor of the
proposed freshman class dance, to be
conducted annually along the lines of
the soph prom and junior jamboree, in
their assembly Wednesday morning.
The social committee was empowered
to make whatever arrangements for
the party which they see fit with the'
other classes.
Fresh lits will discuss the matter at
a class meeting early next week.Should
the plans mature, and the consent of
the faculty be gained, the affair will
be held at some time this spring at the
Armory, and it will be dubbed with
some appropriate name.
Michigan Engineer Receives Office
Col. Henry G. Prout, '71E, has been
elected president of the Union Switch
and Signal company, of New York city.
For many years Col. Prout was editor
of the "Railroad Gazette." He served
in the Civil war in this country, and
later became an officer in the engineer-
ing corps of the Khedive's army in
Egypt. From 1874 to 1878 he was gov-
ernor general of the provinces of the
Equator, t , -

LEAGUE OFFICIALS RESTRICT
NUMBER OF STUDENT PLAYERS
The magnates in the city baseball
league settled the question of allowing
university students to take part in
league games with a compromise at
their meeting Wednesday evening.
The officials were about evenly di-
vided with regard to the question and
it was only after lengthy deliberation
and personal recommendation on the
part of the president that they agreed
that each team shall be permitted to
sign two non-resident students of the
university who shall not be known as
professional players.
The opposition to the granting of
this permission took its stand chiefly
on the idea that the league should in-
clude residents of Ann Arbor only.
Prof. J.R. Allen Speaks in Boise, Idaho
During spring vacation Prof. John R.
Allen spoke at a meeting of Michigan
alumni in Boise, Idaho. Over 130
alumni of the university are in Idaho,
among whom are the attorney general
of the state, and the United States gen-
eral in charge of the engineering work
in that district.
Board Makes Wolverine Appointments
At the meeting of the board in con-
trol of student publications yesterday
the officers for this summer's Wolver-;
ine were chosen. Leo N. Burnett, '14,,
was appointed managing editor, and F.
G. Millard, '14-'16L, business manager.

Due to an accident to the new glider
of the Michigan aviation club, the dual
meet with the Cornell club, which had
been arranged for at Ithaca early in
May, has been cancelled. The glider
was nearly completed Friday, and a
trial flight was attempted at the fair
grounds. At a height of 25 feet a wire
broke and the craft fell to the ground.
L. C. Wilcoxen, '16E, who was in the
glider at the time of the fall, was un-
injured.
The local club is without funds to
repair the glider, which was badly
wrecked, in time for the proposed Cor-
nell meet, and it is probable that no
more attempts to fly will be made in
Ann Arbor this year.
DETROIT SOCIETY TO DONATE
YEARLY FUND FOR LIBRARY
University library authorities have
just been notified that the Borussen
Gesellschaft of Detroit has decided to
make an annual appropriation of $50
to the university library for the pur-
pose of purchasing German books.
Each volume is to bear a plate in-
scribed with the insignia of the soci-,
ety, as is customary in the case of
books presented to the library by out-
side organizations..

CLASS BASEBALL MANAGERS
ADOPT ELIMINATION SYSTEM
At a meeting held Wednesday after-
noon at the athletic association office
the sixteen managers of the baseball
teams entered in the interclass series
agreed with Director Rowe on an elim-
ination system to operate during the
coming contests. "
The team with the highest percent-
age, after having played every other
team in its class, will enter the final
series. The finals will be another per-
centage series in which the high team;
wins the campus championship. With;
the campus championship also goes the
new Jarvis trophy which is being pre-f
sented by the Jarvis Sporting Goods
Company, of Detroit, which gave the
cup awarded in the recent interclass
basketball series. .
It is expected that by week after
next the managers will have their
men in shape for th first games of the
season.. As soon as the grounds onE
South Ferry field are ready the teamst

HAISLIP CHOSEN AS
TO GENERAL MAN
Edward W. Haislip,
appointed by the board
the Union to serve as f
ger of that organizatior

was crew
General

in looking after the ca.
started, for funds with
the new $1,000,000 clu
The new assistant's
sist mainly of the rout:
sary around the buildii
Manager Heath will bE
be out of the city a gi
time.
5,000 Attend Musical
Pres. Harry B. Hutel
ed a wire from H. Bf
manager of the glee
clubs tour, saying the
attended the concert
Greek Theater in a co
with the clubs of the Ut
ifornia.

may begin practice.
Committee Places Six New Teachers
The following appointments have
been made by the Appointment. Com-i
mittee within the past few days: Edith
Owen, '11, Flint, English; Byron E.
Smith, '14, Hartford, superintendent;
Albert E. Sampen, '14, Gladwin, super-
intendent; Florence Essery, '14, Ann
Arbor, assistant .to superintendent;
Edwin C. Zavits, '14, Washington, D.
C.; Mable House, '14, Homer, Latin
and German.

",:
t
'4
i

Summer Job Is Open to Five Students
A summer job for five students is
waiting to be filled at the Union em-
ployment bureau. Those interested
should see Carl E. Guthe, '14, secretary
of the bureau, between four and six
o'clock any afternoon at the Union.

To Have Movie Theatre
A modern theatre bull
erected on North Univer
State and South Thayer

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