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October 12, 1913 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


w

1,

LWe believe in MICHIGAN and
chigan activities, and to show our
chigan Spirit we will give to the

n Varsity

player scoring

most points this fall, a $35.00
:9bsolutely Free

OLD LANDMARK GONE
Dad Skinner's is no more. The quaint
little shop, sacred and hallowed by the
countless numbers of students, long
since forgotten, who have crossed its
threshold, has been razed, to give
place to a modern building.
Many an old graduate coming back
after a long absence first felt the old
thrill of college when passing the tiny
place. Before ever he caught sight of
University hall or the library towers
his eyes were met by the old landmark
and his heart was made glad. For
nearly thirty years the big jolly, ex-
fullback was always to be found be-
hind the counter of the little shop,
where he sold everything dear to the
student heart from thumb tacks to
canoes.
Rumor has it that Dad will remain
on his farm and will not return to
Ann Arbor to live.
The building which is going up on
the sight of the histoirc structure is
beig erected ', John Wahr andehalf
will be occupied by his shoe store the
other half by Haller's jewelry house.
One Committee in Charge of Activities.
Administration of the rules applying
to all participation in non-athletic ac-
tivities has been put in the hands of
a special committee will do all the
work formerly attended to by various
committees on publications organiza-
tions, etc.
Professor W. A. Frayer, as chairman
of the committee, has resigned and
Assistant Professor C. B. Vibbert is
appointed to succeed him.
Arrange Intercollegiate Chess Games.
Intercollegiate chess matches will
be conducted this year by the Chess
and Checkers club. Games are being
arranged with Chicago University and
the University of Illinois. A tourna-
ment will be held at Chicago during
the Christmas holidays, when colleges
from the Middle West will be invited
to compete.

Another Tabloid-Three Days Only
THURSDAY Oct.16,17 and 18
FRIDAY
SATURDAY MATS. Friday and Saturday 3 P. M.
The.DiSTRICT LEADER

WHITNE

A Rollicking, Musical Comedy
Book, Music and Lyrics by Joe Howard.
30-- PEOPLE--- 30
Many, Many Girls

PRICES: : : Down-Stairs, 35c and 25c.
Seat Sale Tuesday I a. m.

Balcony, 25c and 20c

i

I/

I

I-i

J

L Watch our ad in the Daily for the
score, and exceptional offerings in
Fall Suits and Overcoats.

GLEE CLUB WILL PRESENT
HOME PROGRAM THIS YEAR.
Fifty members have been chosen to
compose the 1913-1914 Home Glee club.
This choice is the result of one of the
largest tryouts ever held, and the lead-
ers expect a record-breaking club for
this year.rManager Carpenter is ar-
ranging for a home' program to be
given by the club. The first concerts
will be given during the week of the
meeting of the Michigan State Teach-
ers Association. Next spring 20 men
will be elected from the home club on
the basis of their work during the
winter to make up the trip.
Both organizations this year will be
under the direction of Professor Wil-
liam Howland, with Earl Moore acting
as his assistant.
The first rehearsal 6f the year will
be held next Monday evening at 7:00
o'clock in the Adelphi rooms in Uni-
versity hall.

V TSCH (& PRACHT

Tailors"

117 East Liberty Street

j

tiley

Theadre

rwo Deys
Oraly
TV'sS DAY.

MONDAY
TUESDAY
3 P. M.-

Oct. 13 and 14

PROF. CRANE TO ESTABLISH
NEW MUNICIPAL LIBRARY.
At the instance of President Hutch-
ins, Prof. R. T. Crane is in con-
nection with his work in the economic
department to found a municipal ref-
erence library at the university. The
work is to include an investigation of
all municipal problems throughout
the state and a compilation of statis-
tics and records. Prior to his affilia-
tion with the university Professor
Crane was United States counsul to
Canada, the West Indies and Argen-
tine, South America. Professor Crane
is a graduate from the University of
Maryland and the John Hopkins Uni-
versity.
EXTRA COURSE IN LAW MAY BE
GIVEN BY PROF. H. L. WILGUS.
Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the law de-
partment, will give a course in com-
parative study of Greek, Babylonian,
Hebrew, and English law during the
school year, if enough students care
to take it. The course will be given
at the Congregational church on Sun-
day mornings. All students who are
interested and willing to do additional
research work should meet Prof. Wil-
gus in his office between 1:00 and 2:00
o'clock or on Sunday at 9:30 o'clock
in the Congregational church.
FIRST GARGOYLE DUE OCT. 18.
Michigan's Humor Magazine to Make
Early Appearance.
The "Freshman" number of the Gar-
goyle, Michigan's humor magazine,
will be on sale Saturday.
Leo Burnett, '14, will furnish the
drawing for .the cover, and a short
story by Owen Winter will be featured.
In addition there are to be live
"wheezes" in verse and prose and a
number,of drawings by several artists
new ,to the Michigan student body.
Tryouts for both the business and
editorial staff are asked to see the
business manager, Patrick Koontz, or
Editor Rosenbaum.
New Wires Installed at Ferry Field.
Workmen from the Michigan State
Telephone Company yesterday install-
ed eight loops in the press booths'at
Ferry field, for the Western Union,
to care for press business during foot-
ball season.

MATINEE

R

V ELO S

KINETOPHONE

EDISO

'S

TALKI

C

PICTURES

e Play

The

Voi e

The

Acti on

Re produced

True

to

Life

dison's most realisticI nvention."-Philadelphla Ledger "A storn of enthusiasrn swept over the aWudience."-Bosten Journal
Is so ree the aectors are applayuded."--New York Press 6So amnazingly perfect they are reaily woeird."-Chicag . Tribune
"Make the pictured actors appear real."-New York Tires

DSION'

PRICES:

PICTURES

TALKING

MOVING.

PI C-TVR E S

Nights,

All Seats, 2;5c Matinees, All Seats, iS

* CWhitney Theatre

Wednesday
October

V

1

What Some Americans Have Written About

"Within

the Law"

A

"The liveliest crook drama and best police play of its period."
--BURNS MANTLE, Critic N. Y. Eve. Mail.
"I was among the first to see your wonderful play, and ever since I have been urging all my
friends to go to see it."---ALVA E. BELMONT (Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont).
"'Within the Law' is the real underworld play of today. The story is most interesting, and
the crooks are true to nature. I enjoyed it hugely. Not a dull moment."
---GEO. S. DOHERTY, Second Deputy Police Commissioner of New York.

M

A, / /" I consider 'Within the Law' to be a play of most admirable intensity vibrant wil
its treatment of certain present day conditions quite unique. I think it the equal indi
terest of Sir Charles Young's famous ' Jim, the Penman,' and very much its superio
maushfp."--DAVID BELASCO, the great theatrical manager and producer.

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