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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 01, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

Novel

at

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Senior law "Crease" dance Michigan
Union 8:00 o'clock.
Chemistry department class dance.
Packard academy, 8:30 o'clock.
Union membership dinner, Michigan
Union, 5:30 o'clock.
Consul-General Alfred Geisler speaks
at Bismark celebration, hill audi-
torium, 8:00 o'clock.
Prof. T. C. Trueblood's class presents
"Macbeth," Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, 8:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Junior lit dinner, Michigan Union, 6:00
o'clock.
Women's Alumnae banquet, Barbour
gym, 6: '0 o'clock.

TO HOLD GIANT
BISMARK FETE
THIS EVENING

German Celebration is Biggest
Presented in United States;
P1l"and by Ann Arbor
Sociees

E veir j "I'he

JUNIOR WOMEN
PICTURE FRANCE

IN TENTH PLAY
TreatSilre of Toule" Was Annual
Prodhiction Given by Third
Year Women Last
Night

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB NOMINATES
Wore Names Will Be Handed in After
Spring Vacation
Nominations for the officers of the
Michigan Cosmopolitan club during the
year 1914-15 were made by the board
of directors at its regular meeting last
week. More nominations will bo ad-
ded at the business meeting of the club
after Spring vacation.
The present nominees are: for pres-
ident, W. C. Achi, '14, A. A. Scheerer,
'15L, and Juan A. Bonilla, '15M; for
members of the board of directors,
Fred -B. Foulk, '13-'15L, William M.
Johnston, '13-'16L, Gentok Nakai, '16,
W. S. James, '15D, K. C. Karwell, '17M,
G. H. Kounjean, '15-'17M, E. S. Sy, '15,
and L. D. Randell, '16; for faculty
members: Prof. J. A. C. Hildner and
Secretary James P. Bird; and for bus-
iness members, A. E. Jennings, George
A. Burke and Dr. T. S. Langford.
NEAR-VACATION ABSENCES
TO BE DE ALT WITH HARSHLY

Big

TEACHERS TI
ASSEMBLE

49TH

Arr

Annual Conmention of r
to Begin Officially
Session This
Afternoon

War's;

CONSUL-GENERAL GEISS 1ER
TO BE PRINCIPAL SPEAK ER
Marks First Session of Schoolmasters'
Club; President hutchins
to Give Address
The Bismark 'birthday celebration,

IN 1 NIQU1IE ~'1VO-ACT,,
WITH LOVE AND.

Host of Alusic by Earl Moore;
Be Repeated Thursday
Afternoon

Willi

PIECE
ADVENT'11FRE

kind will be
well matinee
andolin club,
4:15 o'clock,
epertoire, re-
,d novelties,
t to be used
cCoast trip.
f alumni all
gram will be
d "Bill" Wil-
as chief cem-
rn trip, will
d-new stunts
he Midnight
String Quar-
ular ragtime
ity Quartet"

I

Commerce club dance, Granger's, 8:15 Ito be held in Hill auditorium at 8:00

" as
'late

from
e men
n the
1 mo-

o'clock.
Popular Glee and Mandolin club con-
cert, Hill auditorium, 4:15 o'clock.
Junior'law dance, Michigan Union,8:00
o'clock.
Complimentary faculty concert, Hill
auditorium, .8:00 o'clock.
Junior girls' play, Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, 4:00 o'clock.
Canadian club dance, Packard acad-
emy, 8:00 o'clock.
SWING-OUT TO BE.'
HELD ON MAY 12
Senior Lits Vote to Accept 1)ate
Named by Class
Presidents
SHOULD ORDER LAPS AN D GOWNS
With the adoption by the senior lit
class yesterday, of the recommendation
of the committee of senior class pres-
idents, that the date for the tradition-
al "swing-out" be set for Tuesday, May
12, the time for the annual promenade
around the campus was definitely fiix-
ed. Exercises will be held in Univer-
sity Hall preceding the march. The
class also decided to wear caps and
gowns on Wednesdays and Fridays
from swingout until commencement.
The cap and gown committee
announced that Mack and Company,
Henry and Company, and Kyer
are ready to take measurements for
caps and gowns, and it was recommen-
ded that as many as possible order
them before vacation. Rental for the
season will be $2.00 but a deposit of
an additional $3.00 will be required'
at the time of ordering, which will be
refunded when the gown are returned.
Rental of the gowns for commence-
ment only will cost $1.50. Caps and
gowns may be purchased at prices
ranging from $3.50 to $15.00. Various
new styles of stiff crowned hats are
offered by the different companies.Fur-
ther information can be- obtained from
Paul Blanshard, chairman of the com-
mittee, at phone 2319-J.

o'clock.I

5:30
r the

o'clock tonight, under the auspices of
the German societies of Ann Arbor,
will be the biggest event of its kind
ever attempted in this country. A
unique program has been arranged by
the committee in charge,of which Prof.
W. W. Florer, of the German depart-
ment, is the chairman. Consul-Gener-'
al Alfred Geissler, of Chicago, and!
President Harry B. Hutchins will be
the principal speakers. The event will
mark the opening session of the annu-
al meeting of the Schoolmasters' club
of Michigan.
The German consul-general will
speak on "The Economic Development
of Germany since 1870," while Presi-
dent Hutchins will deliver the address
of welcome. Prof. William Howland,
of the school of music, has promised to
sing Schubert's "Erlkoenig," to be ac-
companied by Mrs. Minnie D. Sherrill.
The Varsity quartet is scheduled to
give a few popular German college
songs.
The "Harmonie Maennerchor," con-
sisting of 60 voices, will render "Das
Deutsche Lied," and other selected
songs. Mrs. George A. Hastreiter will
give "Am Rhein," while Frank Taber,
of the school of music will render an
organ selection.
Consul-general Geissler, will arrive
early this morning to inspect the cam.-
pus; he will be the guest of Regent
Junius E. Beal. Besides numerous del-
egations from high schools throughout
the state, several social organizations
will be represented. The Borussenges-
ellschaft, the society which recently
made a donation of German books to
the University library, will attend en
masse; and the committee in charge
of the "Deutscher Haus" movement in
Detroit will arrive here at noon. The
latter deputation will be received by
members of the Deutscher Verein, and
will visit the university buildings.
Admission will be free to all stu-
dents. To avoid congestion, the com-
mittee in charge requests the guests to
observe the following directions: hold-
ers of paid reserved seats will enter
doors three and four on the main
floor, members of the Schoolmasters'
club will enter door -five. Out-of-town
guests will enter doors one and two
on the main floor, and door six, first
balcony. All without tickets may go to
the first balcony except section six, or
the second balcony.
Doors of the entire hall will be
thrown open at 7:00 o'clock in the
evening. No seats will be reserved af-
ter 8:00 o'clock. Doors will be closed
at 8:15 o'clock, and will remain closed
until after the organ recital by Frank
Taber.
ALASKAN POSITIONS OPEN
FOR MICIIIG AN GRAD UTES

Sparkling with clever comedy, and
gay with tuneful music and pictur-
esque costumes, the first performance
of the tenth annual junior girls' play,
"The Treasure of Toule," given last.
night in honor of the women of 1914,
scored a decided success. 4
The play, a comedy in two acts, writ-
ten by Louise F. Markley, '15,was char-
acterized by a clever plot, full or love
and adventure in southern France, and
was successfully interpreted by the
acting. From the time the curtain rose
on the unique setting of the first act,
a room in the Inn Cheval d'Or, until
the last encore, not a dull moment
ensued.
Alice Lloyd as "Paul," the son of a
poverty stricken noble house, and Ro-
maine Bramwell, as "Suzanne," re-
ceived much applause for their beau-
tiful love song,"Castles, Fairy Castles,"
written by Helen Malcomson and Vera
Burridge.
Hertha Hartwig, as "Francois Ver-
on," the inn-keeper, deserves special
commendation for her realistic inter-
pretation of the role.
Lillian Wright, as Fanchon, the flirt,
made one of the hits of the evening
with her clever "Pit-Pat" song. Mary
Lewis, as the pirate chief, Helen Mal-
comson as "Jean," the village black-
smith, Marcia Munsell as the gypsy
fortune teller, and Elizabeth Mason as
Jacqueline, were also worthy of praise.
Among the choruses, the pirate chorus
led by Mary Lewis, as the chief, and
Honora Fogerty as lieutenant, was the
most popular, closely seconded by the
dainty convent maids' chorus.
Most of the music was written by
Earl V. Moore, who acted as musical
director.
The play will be presented again
Thursday afternoon, April 2, preced-
ing the women's banquet.
ZOOLOGY ASSISTANT LIVES
IN WOODS TO STUI)Y FROGS,
Mr. Harold Cummings, an assistant
in the zoology department, is now liv-
ing in a tent at White's woods, located
about two miles west of Ann Abor. He
is engaged in studying the breeding,
habits of frogs.
SIMPLIFIED SPELLERS NOT
ENCOURAGEP BY UNIVERSITYI
Simplified spelling received a jolt;
Monday night, when the University,
Senate refused to accept the invitation
of the state board to declare in its fa-
vor. The advocates of the newer meth-
od have organized bodies at work in
the interest of the cause and attempt-
ed to get the university to support the
movement.
Prof. I. N. Demmon, of the English1
department, spoke against the meas-i
ure, while Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock, of the1
same department, spoke in favor of the1
simplified method.
State Teachers Will See Folk Dancing1
There will be a demonstration of
games, gymnastic drill, and folk danc-i
ing, in Barbour gymnasium at 4:30
o'clock tomorrow afternoon for the1
Michigan Schoolmasters' club.4

According to a statement made yes-
terday by Registrar A. G. Hall, ab-
sences from classes immediately pre-
ceding and following the spring recess
will be dealt with very strictly by the
attendance committee of the literary
department. The same rules as gov-
erned absences at the Christmas. holi-
day time will govern in the present
instance.
RECRUIT PITCHES,
SINGLE HIT GAME
Ferguson Holds Blue Team to One flit
in Five Sessions, Against
Mfalze Squad
BARIBE AS PITCHING UNSTEADY
Ferguson, one of the recruit pitchers
who is battling for a berth on the south-
ern squad, yesterday held the Blue
team to one hit in five innings, and de-
feated Baribeau, veteran hurler, 6 to 0.
While the performance of the young-
ster was a creditable one, the defeat
of the Blue team was only in a small
part the fault of the Varsity hurler
who was pitching for them. Baribeau
yielded three hits in the first inning,
and the soaring disposition of the Blue
infield. still more substantially aided
in netting the Maize four runs.
For the next three innings Baribeau
let but ten men face him, but in the
last round his support again went sky-
ward, and without a hit, the Maize
gained two more runs. But one of the
six runs against Baribeau was earned.
Development of the X-ray plate of
Baer's injured finger shows that there
was no fracture, and Lundgren expects
the veteran will be in shape by the end
of the week.
The teams lined up yesterday as fol-
lows: Maize-Ferguson, p; Hippler, c;
Howard, lb; Lavans, 2b; Baker, ss;
Shivel, 3b; Graham, lf; Sheehy, cf;
Robinson, rf. Blue-Baribeau, p; Matt-
son, c; Werum, lb; Rice, 2b; Caswell,]
ss; Diemer, 3b; Saier, If; Davidson,
cf; Quaintance, rf.
NO SPRING TRIP THIS YEAR
FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
For the first time in nearly ten years,
there will be no spring trip of mechan-
ical engineers this year. The 2,000
mile trip through the east which had
been planned, was cancelled yesterday
because not enough men had signed
up to make the trip worth while. Only
nine students had signified their inten-
tions of going, and the majority of
these will probably go on the trip of
the electrical engineers, which includ-
es stops at the majority of points of in-
terest, which the mechanicals had hop-
ed to visit.

Governor Woodbridge N. Fe
address the general session
100:00 o'clock tomorrow mo:
University Hall on "Commerc
cation and Public School Ideal
Herbert J. Davenport, head of
partment of political econom
versity of Missouri, will als
before this meeting on "The S
Commerce and University Idea
fessor Herbert will lecture be
class in economics 2 at 2:00
tomorrow afternoon in room 3
neering building, on "The Ec
of Ostentation." This lecture
open to members of the School
Club.
Entertainment for the visitin
ers tomorrow afternoon will b
furnished by the Junior Girls'
Sarah Caswell Angell hall a
o'clock, and the matinee conce:
Michigan Musical clubs in Hill
rium at 4:15 o'clock.
President Emeritus James B
and President Harry B. Hutcli
speak at the Michigan Alumr
quet to be held in Barbour gym
at 6:00 o'clock tomorrow eveni
7:00 to 8:00 o'clock there wi]
informal reception of member
Schoolmasters' club, and
speakers at the Michigan Unic
Prof. Andrew F. West, dean
(Continued on page 4.
EXPERIENCED CAI
TO GIVE MACF
A platform recital of "Macbe
be given by Prof. Thomas C
blood's class in Shakespearean
at 8:00 o'clock tonight in Sar
well Angell hall. No admiss
will be charged.
The cast will be changed
scene, so that each member of t
will have an opportunity to p;
of the leading roles. There wi
scenery nor costumes. Amon
in the cast are Durward Grins
"Model Daughter" star and I
Kenyon, '14, Francis L. Hick,
Lucile K. Strong, '14, and Wall
dicori, '15, who took leading
''She Stoops to Conquer."
Band Concert Draws Small
An audience of 500 persons
the Varsity band in the first
spring concert, given last nigh
auditorium. The program wa
ened with a comedy skit with
J. Curry, '15M, in the star role,
er of the band. The solo work
ry, Walthall, Medill and Olson
ed the concert.

GOVERNOR FERRIS TO Si
AT EARLY SESSION TIl
Play by Junior Women and
Banquet Will Provid
Entertainment
The forty-ninth annual c
of the Michigan Schoolmas
will be officially opened this
by the Classical conference
in Memorial hall at 2:00 o'cl
800 delegates expected to a
convention will be present in
the celebration of Bismark's
sary in Hill auditorium this

toast-
rto be
Eck to-

of the eco-
e the faculty
-. J. Daven-
[issouri, will
im, provided
today. Mr.
fore the eco-

lec

na, '14, will give a talk'
acts of the opera. The
tm will comprise vio-
thony Whitmire, of the
, songs from "A Model
eorge McMahon,'16, and
e "11th Hour" quartet.
I present a short skit,
ece orchestra will fur-
ing the course of the

Those Hearing Talk Can Swell Credit
Mr. Harry Lewis, of the mechanical
laboratory, will speak to students of
mechanical engineering tomorrow ev-
ening in room 348 of the new engineer-
ing building. Students enrolled in
courses 7, 8, or 22, of mechanical engi-
neering are especially expected to at-
tend the lecture, and 10 points will be
added to the final examination grades
of students in these courses who are
present.
Health Service to Close in Vacation
The university health service office
on Ingalls street will not be open for
the treatment of patients during the
Easter vacation. It will reopen on the
day that the university resumes its
session.

'IC BOOK
D AT LIBRARY

The first text book on arithmetic,,
dating from the 17th century R. C., is
one of the many interesting exhibits
in the collection of old mathematical
books and records now on exhibit in
the corridor of the general library.

A. call for teachers for Alaska has
been received by the teachers appoint-
ment committee. Applicants must be
men, graduates of the educational or
engineering departments, and prefera-
bly with some athletic ability. The
request states "tall men preferred."

h

Tomorrow

Afternoon 4:15
Pa.cificLE Coast Progreim Inrtact

H i1

15o

farewei

liaatince

Conce

Avdltoriu
rt 15

Novelties, Specialties, Oddities.

All seat,-to 13 Oento

Now on Sale at Wa.hr's

OEM

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