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October 12, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THESE.

ie

1

Vich igan

Daily

I F,

MIC'

.GAO'S

XXIV, No. 12.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CE

i F F f

OHIOANS GIVE

YESTERDAY'S FOOTBALL
RESULTS.
(Courtesy Huston Brothers.)

YOST'S PUPILS
HARDCONTEST
Mt. Union Enlivens Game With For-
ward Passes, Forcing Michigan
to Retain First
String Men.
BRACE IN SECOND QUARTER
SAVES DAY FOR WOLVERINES

WEST
Wisconsin 13, Indiana 0.
Northwestern 0, Purdue 34.
Ohio State 14,Western Reserve!
M A. C. 57, Alma 0.
Illinois 24, Missouri 7.
Kansas 55, Wasington 0.
Nebraska 24, Kansas Aggies 6.
EAST'

E

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VICTORIES

STUDENTS WIN

AT

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BOARD MEETING
Favorable Action on "Summer Base
Ball" Resolution Seems
Probable in Near
Future.
BOARD OF CONTROL GIVES
FINANCIAL SUPPORT TO BAND
Attempt toAward Athletic Insignia
at Public Meetings Will
Be Made.

THE WORLD'S SERIES.

Phila.........1 0 2 0 0 0 0[
NewYork ....0 0 0 0 10 0
H H.
Phila .................3 6
New York.............1 2
Batteries:-
Plank and Schang.
Mathewson and McLean.
* * * * * * * *

0 *
0 0*
1 *
2 *
* *

CONFERENCE RETURN NOW

---- -

CONTROLLED BY REGEI

Board of Control Has Been Awaiting
structions From Adminis-
trative Body

T

Visitors Show Splendid Defense
All Stages; Galt's Injury
Mar's Struggle.

at

Yale 27, Lafayette 0.
Harvard 23, Williams 3.
Princeton 28, Bucknell 6.
Penn. 20, Swarthmore 0.
Cornell' 0, Carlisle 7..
Penn. State 16, Gettysburg 0.
Syracuse 6, Rochester 0.
Amherst 6, Springfield 19.
Brown 6, Ursinus 0.
Dartmouth 33, Vermont 7.
Navy 23, Georgetown 0.
Maine 44, Rhode Island State 0.
* * * * * * * * *

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A plucky little football eleven from
Mount Union college at Alliance, Ohio,
held the Michigan Varsity to a 14 to 0
score on Ferry field yesterday.
Coach Fielding H. Yost did not try
out his policy of experiment. He start-
ed his best eleven, and he kept his
strongest lineup in the game from
opening to final whistle.The reason was
that the Buckeye team, outweighed al-
most man for man, put up the gamest
kind of a struggle and forced the Var-
sity to exert itself to the utmost to
acquire a score approaching compati-
bility with its self respect.
A flash of the expected form in the
second quarter of the game saved
Michigan the ignominy of a nothing to
nothing score, for in the first period
and during the entire last half, the
gamey Ohioans put up a defense that
stubbornly challenged Michigan pene-
tration. Michigan scored twice this
period and though the play that put
the ball within striking distance of
the Buckeye goal line was spectacular
on each occasion, the plays that put
the leather over the chalk-mark had
no striking features from the Mihi-
gan standpoint. They were marked
only by the obdurateness of the Mount
Union line, which refused, almost suc-
cessfully to be punctured.
Michigan started the first quarter
as if she meant business. Receiving
the kickoff, the Maize and Blue war-
riors made their downs three times on
a straight march. Then Michigan tried
a forward pass, which failed, and on
another attempt "the soup was spill-
ed." Mount Union took the ball, and
perceiving that no gains could be made
through Michigan's line, began playing
a game calculated to keep the ball
away from the Ohio goal. Whenever
+. necessary Bletzer punted, but when it
was not necessary the visitors kept the
Wolverine players worried by a varied
and .sometimes successful use of the
forward pass. And during the entire
quarter, neither team had an advan-
tage.1
It was during the second quarter
that Michigan's play approached the
brilliant, and the two Michigan touch-
downs were secured. Hughitt at quar-
ter soon discovered that though the
Mount Union line was light, it was
scrappy,. andthat not much was to be
gained by hammering the fighting for-
wards. He directed a series of plays
around the ends, and Benton and Cat-
lett were successful in skirting the
fi.anks and taking the ball well into
Mount Union territory. One forward
pass, Hughitt to Lyons put the oval
on the four yard line, and then Mount
Union braced.
With four yards to go, the Michigan
players took four downs to make the
distance. Each line plunge resulted
in a pile-up, and it was only after the
fourth attempt that Hughitt was dis-
covered at the bottom of the heap with
the ball inches across the line.
Elated with this success, Michigan
started out to repeat and did it. Ben-
ton, Catlett and Quinn negotiated short
gains and Hughitt added a long run
(Continued on page 4.)

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FRESH MAN ELEVEN:
DOWNS NORMALITES,
JAMES OF FRESHMAN SQUAD
RECEIVES INJURED SHOULDER
The All-Fresh opened their season
auspiciously yesterday afternoon in
the curtain raiser to the Mount Union
game by overwhelming the heavy State
Normal team 26 to 0.
The youngsters received the kick-off,
and after a series of plunges by Maul-
betsch and end runs by Calvin, Hue-
bel went over for a score.
In the second quarter conditions
were reversed. Splawn was forced to
punt from behind his own goal line,
and the Normals continually threat-
ened the youngsters goal with a series
of forward passes.
In the third quarter Maulbetsch
went over for two scores, good gains
by Splawn and Calvin around ekd
supplementing his line bucks. The
last score came early in the fourth
quarter following a run of 35 yards
by Splawn. Maulbetsch carried the
ball to the five yard line, and Ziger
went over.
Splawn's punting and forward pass-
ing, Maulbetsch's plunging, the end
running of Calvin, and the work of
Rehor, Pierce and Nieman in the line
were the brilliant features of the vic-
tory. Huebel and Ziger handled the
team well.
Don James, playing at end for the
freshmen, received an injury to his
left shoulder during the game. It is
thought the collar-bone may be crack-
ed. James will probably be out of the
game for a time.
The teams lined up as follows:
Freshmen (26) State Normal (9)
McNamara,
Paterson ........ L.E. .. . Rynearson
Finkbinder,

FRATERNITIES SWELL UNION
MEMBERSHIP; RECORDS BROKEN
Michigan Union membership to-
taled 2520 at a late hour last night, ex-
ceeding last year's final record by
about 100. Out of 715 men in 35 fra-
ternities only 20 are non-Union men.
The fraternity part of the canvass has
been conlucted by Ralph Conger, '14,
who expects to have completed the
campaign by tomorrow. Professional
chapters are still below the average.

Re-organization of the board in con-
trol of athletics giving student repre-
sentation on the executive committee,
the re-election of Professor Allen S.
Whitney to the chairmanship, the vot-
ing of financial support to the univer-
sity band, the proposal of an amend-
ment to the present eligibility rules
which would allow summer baseball
for Michigan players and the providing
for public award of athletic insignia
were the principal acts of the bdard at
its session last night.
H. Beach Carpenter, '14, one of the
three student representatives on the
board was named as the student mem-
ber of the executive committee when
the necessary amendment to the by-
laws was adopted by the board and
the consequent reorganization urged
for some time by the Michigan student
body, was effected. The executive
committee is the sub-organization of
the board which has charge of athletic
activities during the summer and also
has charge of certain phases of the
board's activities during the year. It
will now consist of Chairman Whit-
hey, James 0. Murfin, Director Bartel-
me and H. Beach Carpenter.
The re-election of Professor Whit-
ney furnished the closest vote of the
session, the results of the secret ballot
standing 6 to 5. Inasmuch as the bal-
loting was secret no determination
as to the scattering of the votes is ob-
tainable, but it is believed that the
student members on the board voted
unanimously in favor of Professor
Aigler, the faculty representative of
radical pro-conference element.
Financial support to the extent of
$800 was voted to the university band.
This action came, following a' debate
in which it was shown that such sup-
port would be contrary to the regula-
tions of the Intercollegiate Confer-
ence which prohibits financial support
from the athletic association of any
activity other than purely athletic. A
committee consisting of Professor1
Whitney, Director Bartelme, and a1
member of the student council yet to1
be named, was nominated to look up'
the re-organization of the band.
A "summer baseball" resolution was
presented to the board and while itt
was tabled pending investigation of
the situation, unofficial comment on]
the matter seemed to indicate a futurel
favorable action by the members ofl
the board. The resolution provides an
amendment to the present eligibility

START EXTENSION
WORK IN DETROIT
UNIVERSITY WORK BEGUN.
IN DETROIT HIGH SCHOOL
An innovation in university work
was inaugurated yesterday morning at
the Detroit Central high school, when
the first class in in the new university
extension course met with Professor
Henderson. The work, which will be
conducted on the regular credit plan,
is intended primarily for teachers, al-
though other persons are at liberty
to take up the courses on the payment
of the tuition fee The three regular
university courses are offered as fol-
lows: Prof. Robert 'M. Wenley, course
2a in ethics; Prof. Thomas E. Rankin,
course 3 in rhetoric and Prof. William
A. Frayer, course 12 in history. Actual
work will begin next Saturday at 9:00
o'clock and clases will meet once a
week at this hour during the season.
To facilitate registration, Mr. R. A.
Campbell, the university treasurer,
has opened temporary offices in the
Detroit Central high school building.
Yesterday about 200 teachers enrolled.
This enrollment does not include those
who registered prior to Saturday, and
no definite figures can be given out
before the commencement of classes,
which start Saturday at 9:00 o'clock
in the morning.
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS TO
SPEAK AT UNION DINNER.
President Harry B. Hutchins will be
the principal speaker at the first mem-
bership dinner of the Michigan Union
to be held at 5:30 o'clock Wednesday.
Talks by prominent students and mus-
ical numbers are also planned.
Tickets at 50 cents will be on sale
tomorrow at the Union desk and by the
following committeemen: Edward
Haislip, chairman, S. M. Abrams, C.
M. Anderson, J. B. Angell, Jr., Carl
Bloomfield, A. G,. Cohen, Arthur Den-
nison, Louis Dunton, A. F. Eidemiller,
J. Elliott, N. D. Ettinger, J. Helm, E.

Why?
The Board in Control last night,
answered why the committee author-
ized on March 22 to be appointed had
not yet been named, in the following
statement: "The Board in Control is
now and has been since the above
date awaiting the further instructions
from the Board of Regents."
The Board in Control at the same
time appointed a committee consisting
of Chairman Whitney, Judge James.
Murfin and Albert Fletcher to devise
a ways 'and means by which possible.
negotiations might be opened with the
Regents, to discover how the Board in
Control is to proceed with negotia-
tions with the Conference. ,The com-
mittee is not the committee that was
authorized by the motion of March 22.
It has no power to go directly before
the Board of Regents, but is: to make
recommendations to the Board in Con-
trol as to how it shall go before the
Michigan Regents.
The discussion of the Conference
question occupied more than half of
the time during .the Board's session.
The student representation,headed by
Albert Fletcher, stood out stoutly for"
some step toward the opening up of
negotiations with the Conference.
The statement issued by the Board
follows:
"The representatives of the Board
in Control of Athletics of the Univer-
sity of Michigan met officially on Feb-
ruary 1, 1913, the Directors of the In-
tercollegiate Conference Athletic As-
sociation, and on February 15, 1913,
the faculty representatives and the di-
rectors of the above association in the
hope that some agreement might be
reached on the various mooted ques-
tions including the training table,,
number of games, games to be played
with Conference colleges and in fact
any and all matters of disagreement.
As a result of these meetings it. be-
came clearly apparent that the pre-
requisite to any further negotiations
of any of these questions was a reor-
ganization of the personnel of the
Michigan Board in Control,-a reor-
ganization that would result in an ac-
tual voting majority of members of the
university faculty and in addition a
veto power lodged in the President of
the University. It was further stated
by the members of the Conference
that any reorganization that would
carry witli it the certification of the
President of the University of Michi-
gan that in his opinion such reorgan-
ization constituted faculty control
would be acceptable to them. The
committee of our Board in Control re-+
ported the results of these conferences
to the full Board with the result that
the following resolution was adopted
March 22.i
"'Resolved-That this Board ex-1
press its willingness to recommend to
the Board of Regents a reconstitution
of this Board so as to include a ma-
jority of Faculty members, with a veto
power over the 'actions of the Board
residing in the #President of the Uni-
versity, and that this Board is in favor
of returning to the Intercollegiatei
Conference with the Board recon-
structed as above stated."
"'Resolved-That Michigan'e appli-
cation for membership in the Western
Intercollegiate Conference be contin-
gent upon the Conference first repeal-

ing their boycott rule."
"'The purpose of the -above was to
submit. to theBoard of Regents the
question of;auchreorganization, ith
the recommendation on 'the part of the
Board in Control that such be com-
plied with. In the event of the Board
of Regents of the University of Mich-
igan acting 'favorably upon the above
recommendation, a/ committee was to
be appointed in pursuance to a further
motion adopted at the Marh 22nd
meeting to the effect that 'the Chair-
man appoint a committee to continue
negotiations with the Conference of
which Mr. Hibbard shall be a mem-
ber." The' Board in' Control is now
and has been since the above date
awaiting., the further instructions of
the Board of Regents.
t "The above statement is made in
compliance with a motion passed at
the meeting of the 'Board in Control
held this date, October 11, 1913,
Signed-
JOHN D. HIBBARD,
H. BEACH CARPENTER,
P. G. BARTELME."
Committee.
ILLINOIS REGENTS TURN
TOLD SHOULDER TO MICHIGAN
The Board ,of Regents of the Uni-
versity of Illinos, at a session held on
Saturday, followed the example of the
Minnesota legents in turning down
the resolution of the Michigan Board
of Regents. The action by the ruling
body of the Gopher institution was
taken last Monday.
The resolution which met with the
unfavorable action is that prepared by
the Michigan Regents after their meet-
ing last spring during which the Con-
ference question was discussed by
them. The resolutions contained a
statement of the "home-rule" stand
taken by Michigan in the matter of the
present difficulties.
WILL CONTINUE
TO PLAY SOCCER
.DIRECTOR ROWE TO HAVE
CHARGE OF DAILY PRACTICES
Michigan students will again have
an opportunity to witness some'snappy
exhibitions of soccer football, the game
which attracted so much favorable
attemtion during its short life last fall.
Director Rowe is to have charge of
the squad and will devote two hours
each afternoon to this branch of sport.
Two games have already been sched-
uled with the Michigan State Normal
College at Ypsilanti, the first of which
is to be played October 25 at Ypsilan-
ti if a team can be whipped into shape
by that time. If not,' the date will be
November 8. The second fracas 'is
slated for November 29 at Ferry field.
Because of the interest manifested
by the foreign students in soccer last
year, Director Rowe has announced
the possibility of forming a separate
team of the Cosmopolites. -By this
means it is hoped, not only to interest
more active participants in the game,
but also to enliven it from the spec-
tator's standpoint.
The first practice of the year will
be held tomorrow at 4:30 o'clock.

Kearney.. ...L.T.
Rehor, Paisley.....L.G.
Nieman........... C.. .
Skinner,
DeCoudres.....R.G.
Pierce, Growan.... R.T.
James, Dunn,
Thor ............ R.E.
Huebel, Ziger......Q.B.
Calvin, Gratz.. . L.H..
Maulbetsch (C)....F.B.
Splawn, Zewadski. .R.H.

...Morrison
.. Bahnmiller
...... Hartman
...........O tt
.......Moore
Crouse, (C)
McKay
.... Goodrich
.........Pearl
.......Curtis
.... Kishigo

rules for baseball players in which the ' M. Heider, F. J. Hsu, W. A. John, G. S.
only requirements will be one year's Johnston, J. Leonard, R S. Munter, J.
attendance in school and the meeting F. Murphy, J. Primrose, L. Rieser, H.
of the regulation scholastic standards. Rummell, W. L. Seibert, G. Shoemaker,
The resolution was presented by Judge S. A. Stealy, E. S. Thornton, F. Town,
(Continued on page 4.) and H. Whittaker.

Score-first half-freshmen 6, Nor-
mal 0. Final score, Freshmen 26, Nor-
mal 0.
Touchdowns-Maulbetsch 2, Huebel,
Ziger; goals from touchdown, Splawn
two in four attempts; referee-Mur-
phy, Michigan; umpire-Kennedy,
Princeton; head linesman-Rowe,
Michigan; time of quarters-9 min-
utes.

Presbyterian Church

Corner Huron and
Division Street

LEONARD A. BARRETT, MINISTER
10.30 A. M. Subject-Religion and Politics.
12 Noon. Classes for Students. Prof. W. D. Henderson will speak
to the men's class.

6:30 P. M.

C. E. Young People Invited.

L

Union Guild
Series

Dr.

cm.

Pud

Congregational
Church

m

OF INDIANAPOLIS

I

To-night

Subject:

"Scribes and Pharisees"

7:45 P. M.

U

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