100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 27, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

'lic

~igan

juai

7T

of

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

r

"

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Wright saxophone party, Michigan Un-
ion, 9:00 o'clock.
Round-up formal party, Armory, 9:00
o'clock.
Deutscher Verein dance, Barbour gym,
8:30 o'clock.
Dixie club smoker, Michigan Union,
7:30 o'clock.

HURLER WINGED IN
BATTING PRACTICE

PAGEANT TRYOUTS
WILL END APRIL 3
ilen Are Hesitant to Enter Names on
Joan of Arc Production
Entry Lists

CORNELL AND MICHIGAN TO
HOLD GLIDER MEET IN MAY
Will Be First Intercollegiate Aero
Contest on Record

TRACK MEN

"Bill"

-

Davidson Struck by Pitched
Ball on Left Arm While
at Plate

SQUAD MAY GET OUT SATURDAY SPECTACLE SLATED FOR MAY

FAIR FORM F
CORNELL EV

LeaveI

21;

at

rtain; Seats in
w Being
ast, chorus, or-
nen of "A Model
his morning at
ichigan Central,
ey will present
way theater to-
ist of all those
p was posted at
nd contains the
participated in

ving in the
vill be taken'
iversity club
Dr guests at
will be heldI
eater. It is
11 be played
uch as seats
top gallery,
sold several
ill return to
1:30 o'clock

EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Soph lit "Punch Dansant," Barbour
gym, 2:00 o'clock.
Union Boat club dance, Michigan Un-
ion, 9:00 o'clock.
Irish Players, Whitney theater, mat-
inee, 2:30 o'clock; evening 8:15
o'clock.
Cornell-Michigan track meet, Water-
man gym, 7:30 o'clock.
Prof. H. M. Kallen speaks before Me-
norah society, Newberry hall, 7:30
o'clock.
Mr. John Spargo addresses Michigan
Socialist club, Newberry hall, 7:30
o'clock.
TICKETS FOR "APRIL FOOL"
DINNER GO ON SALE TODAY
Tickets for the "April Fool" mem-
bership dinner, to be given at the Un-
ion at 5:30 o'clock next Wednesday.
night, will be placed on sale this morn-=
ing at 50 cents each. They may be
obtained at the desk or from members
of the committee.
Stunts appropriate to the day will;
feature the program. K. B. Hoch, '14,
general chairman of the opera, will
tell some of the inside facts in ar-
ranging for the annual production
and the Mimes will contribute a short
skit. . A student trio will furnish mu-
sic during the meal and several selec-
tions by the varsity quartet and a vio-
lin solo by Anthony Whitmire will fea-
ture the regular program.
SENIOR LIT BEAU BRUMMELS 1
S. 0. S. FOR 50 MORE CANESt

With less than a week left before
the southern trip, Coach Lundgren is
hoping for drying winds with the
change in weather, in order that he
can take the team out on Ferry field.
There is a possibility of the men get-
ting out Saturday.
Yesterday's practice was marred by
an accident to "Bill Davidson, who
was struck in the arm in batting prac-
tice by a swiftly pitched ball thrown
by Furgeson. Davidson is the star
hard luck player on the squad, having
just recovered from two badly split
fingers. Fortunately, both injuries
were on his left arm, instead of his
throwing wing.
Quaintance, Baribeau, Davidson,
Furgeson, Soddy and Vogel were the
hurlers to work out yesterday; the
day's work being largely batting drill,
as Thursday is an off day in the train-
ing camp.
SENIOR ENGINEERS TO GIVE
LOAN FUND FOR MEMORIAL

Entry lists for the Joan of Arc pa-
geant will be closed on April 3, when
all names should be handed in to Pro-
fessor H. A. Kenyon, at his office in
room 23, old engineering building.
Professor Kenyon said yesterday, that
he was anxious for the student body
to realize that this pageant is a uni-
versity affair and not devoted entirely
to the women of the campus,as is com-
monly supposed. More men are need-
ed than women, and he is desirous that
greater interest be manifested by the
men. No ability as an actor is requir-
ed.
Detail wo on the pageant will oc-
cupy the various committees up until
the time for spring vacation, when
practically all arrangements for the
production on May 21 are to be com-
pleted. From the character and pro-
portions of the work, it will be the
largest ever presented in the middle
west by a student organization, and
probably surpass in its dimensions the
Joan of Arc pageant staged by Har-
vard university several years ago.
The success of this venture is being
watched with special interest, since it
is the first time in the history of Mich-
igan university that a student produc-
tion on so large a scale has involved
both men and women of the univer-
sity.
Bids for the manufacturing of the
costumes for the pageant are still un-
der consideration. Bert St. John may
be secured to train the dancing chor-
uses and lead roles. Work will com-
mence immediately;after vacation.

A glider meet, to be held either May
15 or 22, between the Michigan and
Cornell Aero clubs, is now practically
a certainty. In a letter received by
F. E. Loudy, '15E, president of the
Michigan club, the Ithacans express'
themselves as willing to come to Ann
Arbor, or to pay part of the expenses
of the local flyers to Ithaca. The let-
ter stated that Michigan and. Cornell
were the only two universities in the
country which were experimenting in
aviation.
The meet between the two schools
will be the first intercollegiate aviation
contest on record. Both clubs will at-
tempt to beat the record of 2 1-2 miles,
made by a Cornell man last year in a
towed glider on a circular track. Ef-
forts to beat the Cornell passenger
carrying record will be made.
The new glider of-the Michigan Aero
club is nearly completed. The design
was made by F. E. Loudy, '15, and L.
C. Wilcoxen, '16E. The glider is larg-
er and more elaborate than its prede-
cessor. Experiments on the new glid-
er will be conducted during spring va-
cation at the Fair Grounds.
FATHER OF "LEADING LADY"
KEEPS SON FROM FOOTLIGHTS

Capt. Kohler and Quinn, Shot Putt
IHave Slight Injuries That
May Bother Them
Saturday
VISITORS MAY RUN STRONG
IN MILE AND HALF MI
Dashes and Field Contests Proba
Point Winners for Michigan
Track Squad
Michigan's track men finished th
last day of preparation for the d
meet with Cornell, yesterday aft
noon, with every man in conditi
Kohler and Quinn both sustain
slight injuries to their legs, but I
hurt to neither was serious enough
put them out of shape.
Trainer Farrell is looking to i
dash men and the entrants in the f1e
events to make the strongest bid D
firsts in Saturday's meet. Quinn a
Phelps have both heaved the 16 pou
weight close to 40 feet, and they m
develop the class to push the Corn
heavers.
Cornell is expected to reap a hea
harvest in the distance and the midd
distance events, where they will
represented by the runners who w
the two mile relay race from Michig
at the Pittsburg relays last Saturda
Trainer Farrell, in spite of the sho
ing at Pittsburg, still has confidence
Murphy, and in the other half mile
and is not willing to concede the Ith
cans all the points in these ever
without any opposition. Fox is runni
a strong mile, and at the rate he h,
been developing this year, should ma
his best indoor race on Saturday.
Farrell has been pointing his squ
to this meet all during the indoor se
son, and he feels confident that t
Michigan team is in the best sha
possible to give a good account
itself in the impending struggle.

less an unexpected relapse oc-
to Waldo Fellows, who is suffer-
from an attack of laryngitis, he
be able to take his part in the

The senior engineers will have for
a class memorial a loan fund of from
$300 to $400 with which to help other
engineers through their lastyear. It
is planned to increase this fund at the
different class reunions and if possi-
ble extend its privileges to the juniors.
The money will be left with the uni-
versity treasurer and will be loaned
to those seniors, who in the opinion
of a committee of faculty men, have
done good work and need the money.
One half of the fund will be loaned
each year on notes without interest,
payable two years from date, so that
there will always be a man in school
receiving its benefits.

Mr. James Grinstead, former mayor
of Louisville, Ky., is in town visiting
his son, Durward, the opera star. He
will leave this afternoon for Detroit
in time to see the 1914 production. In
an interview last night, Mr. Grinstead
said that his son would have been on
the stage as a professional player to-
day had not Mr. Grinstead desired him
to remain in college. Durward receiv-
ed an offer to succeed Julian Eltinge,
in the leading role of "The Fascinating
Widow" ,last summer, but his father
turned down the proposition.
TRIO OF VARSITY FENCERS
LEAVES TODAY FOR CHICAGO

PPEARS TOMORROWI

dent Angell Among Contributors
to Cosmopolitan Organ
esident-Emeritus James B. Angell
e of the chief contributors to the
1 number of the Cosmopolitan
ent, which will make its appear-
tomorrow. His subject is "West-
Education in the Far East."
James A. MacDonald, managing
r of the Toronto Globe has writ-
LI article for the magazine on
ida's Imperial Relations," while
n Mead, director of the World
e Foundation has contributed one
Edwin Ginn-A World Citizen."
eorge A. Nasmyth, ex-director of
Gorda-Fratres central committee
t contribution on the "Standardi-
n of World Publications."
e departments of intercommuni-
n, world news and extension lec-
are the three innovations of this
's magazine. C. P. Wang, '14,
has an article on "Race Preju-

A rush. order for 50 additional sen-
ior lit canes was sent in last evening,
as the result of the demand which the
sticks created when given out yester-
day afternoon. In the first shipment
of 100 canes, several of the sticks were
damaged, so that 'only about 85. were
given out. Several men who ordered
canes did not call for them, and un-
less these men communicate with the
committee today, these canes will be
given out to men who signed up for
the second batch, but who desire their
canes immediately.
Forty additional canes were signed
for yesterday, and the committee or-
dered ten extra ones, making 50 in all.
As this is the last order, it is desired
that all men who want canes see the
committee at once, in order that the
10 extra ones may be taken up. It is
believed the second shipment of canes
will reach Ann Arbor before spring
vacation.
Students Recover From Blood Poison
Howard E. Weaver, '16P, will leave
the university hospital today, where
he has been confined with a badly in-
fected knee, the result of an injury
sustained during basketball practice in
Waterman gymnasium. Weaver has
been in the hospital for several weeks.
The condition of H. A. Arnold, '17D,
was much improved yesterday. He will
also be able to leave the hospital in a
few days, having suffered from a se-
vere attack of blood-poisoning.
Fresh Laws Will Dance Monday Night
Fresh laws will dance at Granger's
Monday night from 8:30 to 12:00
o'clock. Prof.W.Gordon Stoner and Mrs.
Stoner will chaperone the party. Tick-
ets are selling at 75 cents per couple.1

SOCIAL SERVICE EXPERT TO
GIVE TWO LECTURES TODAY
Mr. Fred H. Rindge, national secre-
tary of the industrial service move-
ment among college men, will speak
on "The College Man and Industrial
Workers," in room 348 engineering
building at 11:00 o'clock today.
He will speak also at 7:30 o'clock
this evening at Newberry hall. Both
lectures will be illustrated and are of
special value to those interested in
playground work.
Boat Club Dance Tickets on Sale Now
Professor H. T. L. Hus and Mrs. Hus
and Mr. and Mrs. F. R. Finch will
chaperone the Union Boat club dance
next Saturday night. Tickets for Boat
club members were put on sale at
5:00 o'clock yesterday afternoon, and
may be obtained upon presentation of
a membership card. The sale will be
thrown open to other Union members
at 12:00 o'clock Saturday.
1915 Laws Vote Down Annual Banquet
At a meeting of the junior law class
yesterday, the members voted not to
hold their annual banquet because of
the failure to find a practical place to
give it in Ann Arbor. The class also
voted to give numerals to its basket-
ball team and to hold a class dance
Thursday, April 2.
Mrs. J. W. Bradshaw Dies in California
Mrs. Bradshaw, wife of Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw of the mathematics depart-
ment, died yesterday in Monrovia, Cal-
ifornia. The interment will be in
Bristol, Va. Professor Bradshaw has
been at the coast on leave: of absence.

A. G. BRYANT WILL BE HONOR
GUEST AT DINNER TONIGHT
President Harry B. Hutchins, sever-
al members of the board of regents
and 25 representative business men
of the city, will be present at a din-
ner to be given tonight at the Michi-
gan Union, in honor of Albert G. Bry-
ant, director of the World Peace
Foundation. Mr. Bryant will be in
Ann Arbor tomorrow and Saturday
and will then go to several other cities
in the state, before taking up the ques-
tion of the appointment of a Michigan
state peace commissin with Governor
Ferris.
Charter Special Car for Home Trip
The Illinois club at its meeting Wed-
nesday afternoon, decided to charter a
special car for the accommodation of
its members for the spring vacation
trip home. The car will be attached
to the 1:19 o'clock train, Friday af-
ternoon April 3. A special commit-
tee, consisting of B. S. Leiserwitz, '15L,
W. E. Rankin, '16, and Clayton Roehm,
'16, has been appointed to consider
sending The Michigan Daily to high
schools throughout the state of Illi-
nois.
Socialist Leader to Lecture Saturday
Mr. John Spargo of New York will
address the Michigan Socialist club
Saturday night in Newberry hall. Mr.
Spargo, although only 38 years old, is
one of the leading pamphleteers of the
socialist party and is recognized as
an authority on the subject of social-
ism.
Three Solos Planned For Band Concert
Three soloists will feature the first
annual spring concert to be given by
the Varsity band in Hill auditorium
next Tuesday. The men picked are
George J. Curry, '15M, D. 0. Walthall,
'16M, and W. C. Medill, '16.

Headed by Captain Mattson, the var-
sity fencers leave this afternoon for
Chicago to take part in two dual meets
with the University of Chicago and Ill-
inois Athletic club.
Julius Martinek, '14E, and Kenneth
White, '17E, will accompany Captain
Mattson, '15E, and the trio are confi-
dent of scoring a victory over the Ma-
roon foilers. The Illinois Athletic club
boasts of having several of the best
fencers in the west, and the Wolver-
ine captain is less optimistic over the
chance against these men.
U. OF M. GRADUATES HELP TO
SEND WASHINGTON CREW EAST
University of Michigan alumni in
Seattle have subscribed $50.00 toward
the fund being raised to send the Uni-
versity of Washington crew to Pough-
keepsie this year. The Michigan grad-
uates were the first last year to sub-
scribe to the fund, the first year the
crew was sent to the eastern classic.
The spirit of the alumni is commented
upon favorably in a recent issue of the
University of Washington Daily.
Committee Asks For Location Blanks
All students registered in the edu-
cational department who have not fill-
ed out location blanks are requested
to do so at the office of the teachers
appointment committee at once. It
is important that the committee have
these blanks immediately.
Piza, '17E, Recovers From Operation
Pedro A. Piza, '17E, is rapidly re-
covering from an operation that was
performed Wednesday to removd an
abscess from his lung at the university
hospital. The operation was success-
ful and physicians report that Piza is
already much improved.

AT UNION NEXT THURSDAY
Opera music from "A Model Daugh-
ter," will feature the Junior lit ban-
quet Thursday night, April 2, at the
Union. Prof. John R. Brumm, of the
rhetoric department, and Prof. David
Friday, of the economics department,
will speak. Robert C. Barnum, '15,
will act as toastmaster. Tickets,which
are selling for 60 cents, may be ob-
tained from members of the committee.
Senior Druggists Choose Tassel Colors
The senior pharmics at their meet-
ing yesterday selected the tassels for
the seniorial caps which are to be in
yellow and olive green for the four
year men and olive green for the two
year men. These colors were chosen
for the first time last year.

PRES. WILSON SELECTS DEAN
GUTHE FOR GOVERNMENT W(
President Woodrow Wilson has
pointed Dean Karl Guthe, of the g:
uate school, as a member of the c
mittee of 100 leading scientists to
the government in scientific resea
in the universities and colleges of
country. There have been 82 appc
ments made to the committee at p
ent, Dean Guthe. representing Mi
gan. He is one of eight promin
physicists to be placed on the boar
Metallurgists Visit Detroit Tomor
The class in metallurgy will le
at 6:57 o'clock tomorrow morning
way of the Michigan Central, for
troit, where they will visit conce
which produce metal products. A
one interested in this trip should m,
arrangements today with Prof. A
White, room 125 chemistry buildin
Verein to , Hold Initiation Ton:
The Deutscher Verein will init
the 16 men and 12 women elected
the 'last meeting, at 8:00 o'clock
night in the Verein room. An initiat
dance in Sarah Caswell Angell h
will be given immediately follow'
the initiation.
Dr. Bunting to Speak in Philadelp
Dr. R. W. Bunting, of the patholo
cal laboratory of the dental sch
will leave today for Philadelp
where he will deliver a lecture
"Sulpo-cyanates and Saliva," be]
the Academy of Stomatology, on S
urday, March 28.

ii

PRIL 2

1 11

Women's

Banquet
FOR

50

Students and Alumnae.

p. ma

ekrbourGymnasi*u

11

- - -- -

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan