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March 22, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-22

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1914.

PRICE FIVE C

a

FALLS
ST TIME
14 OPERA

EVENTS FOR TODAY

Rabbi Leo M. Franklin speaks to
ish students, Newberry hall,
o'clock.

Jew-
8:00

PRESIDENTS WILL
DELIVER ADDESSES
Celebrated Lecturers Are Secured to
Speak Before Both Church and
Guild Audiences

oduction "A Model Daughter""
Presented for its Final
Applause of Campus
Last Night
OF GRINSTEAD ADDS
ATLY TO SHOW'S SUCCESS
flows, and Reed Score Their
al Hit Through Clever
Interpretations
as Ann Arbor is concerned,
Daughter" is a thing of the
Michigan Union's seventh
successful opera received its
presentation at the Whitney
st night. Now it remains for
-d Chicago to add their stamp
-al.
formance last night was no-
or its smoothness. Hardly a
'where served to call atten-
e fact that a college produc-.
being presented. There was
ble between principles, cho-
rchestra that savored of the

:ead as Brownie Du-
tal model, was again
pera.' His imperson-
nine loveliness calls
idmiration. Playing
tead, George McMa-
d ingratiatingly. As
ould, Waldo Fellows
ored ii their respect-

the perform-
d the author,
take several

Mr. Ozora Davis speaks at the Majes-
tic theater, 6:10 o'clock.
Dr. Charles F. Thwing speaks on Wes-
leyan guild series, Methodist church,
7:30 o'clock.
Miss Grace Wolf, '14, speaks at Y. W.
C. A. vesper service, 4:15 o'clock.
Miss Francis Taft speaks in Newberry
hall, 4:30 o'clock.
Weekly Sunday afternoon entertain-
ment, Michigan Union, 2:30 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Combined senior lit and engineer din-
ner dance, Michigan Union, 6:00
,'clock.
Y. W. C. A. lecture by Prof. David Fri-
day, Newberry hall, 4:30 o'clock.
Prof. T. E. Rankin speaks to Educa-
tional club, Tappan hall,7:00 o'clock.
PROGRAM FORMED .
FOR CANOE RACES
Canoe races, diving, swimming and
tilting contests will feature the spring
regatta to be held under the auspices
of the Union boat club, Friday and Sat-
urday, May 30 and 31, according to the
plan outlined by H. S. Parsons, '15E.
The canoe races will include singles
as well as doubles, and there will be a
half mile, 300 yard and 100 yard race.
An effort will be made to introduce
mixed doubles as there are known to
be many expert paddlers among the
college women.
The swimming will include half
nile, 440, 100 and 50 yard races. There
will also be a running dive fordistance
and diving for form. The Mimes have
consented to present a vaudeville skit
between races in the natural amphithe-
ater at the bend of the river, about a
quarter of a mile above Tessemer's.
The entertainment in the evening
will be in the form of a Venetian night.
The festivities will begin with a pa-
rade, followed by a review of floats
representing various organizations.
Handball Men Play Their Third Round
The third round in the handball tour-
nament was played yesterday with the
following results: Del Valle beat Mar-
tin in three sets 15-4, 10-17, and 15-4.
Pfeiffer won from Tristler 10-15, 17-14;
and 17-0. Furgeson took two of three
sets from McQueen 18-7,6-15,and 18-11.
Werum defeated Tandy in two frames
15-7 and 15-16. George eliminated
Peddicord 15-9, 1-16, 15-15.
Botanist Will Speak in Cleveland, Ohio
Dr. H. T. A. Hus, of the botany de-
partment, has been invited to give a
series of lectures covering general bo-
tanical subjects, before the Garden'
club of Cleveland. The lectures will
be of an elementary nature, and will
be given during the spring vacation.
that the matter was not well consider-
ed by those present. The alumni will
certainly be reluctant to believe that
further and fuller consideration, will
fail to bring this class in line with all
previous classes, in a matter of such
importance to the university and to the
class.
It will be a fine bit of irony, if a
class which has been so largely bene-
fited by the generosity of . previous
classes, should selfishly refuse to pass
on the bounty.
"Freely ye have received, freely
give,"

DAVIS

Pres. Ozora S. Davis will speak in the
Majestic theater at 6:30 o'clock, and
in the Congregational church at 7:45
o'clock tonight. Although his sub-
jects have not been announced, he will
probably treat phases of social service
work. He comes to Ann Arbor from
Detroit, where he delivered an address
at the Life Work Conference.
After being graduated from Dart-
mouth College, and Hartford Theolog-
ical Seminary, he received the degree
of doctor of philosophy from the Uni-
versity of Leipzig. Iowa and Dart-
mouth Colleges have conferred the de-
gree of doctor of divinity up on him.
He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and
Theta Delta Chi fraternities.
Wesleyan Guild
Dr. Charles F. Thwing, president of
Western Reserve University, will de-
liver a Wesleyan guild lecture in the
Methodist church at 7:30 o'clock to-
night. "The Interpretation of Life" is
the subject of his address. His books,
dealing with the family, college life,
and educational topics intensify the
appeal he makes to university audi-
ences. He spoke to the students of
Yale University on March 7.
GOLF COMMITTEE MAKES UP
FINAL ROLLS MONDAY NIGHT
Thirty-five men have enrolled with
Secretary T. H. Tapping of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Golf Association,
the new organization of students in-
terested in the game. It is expected
that several more will join before the
executive committee makes up its final,
rolls at a meeting called for Monday
night. At that time the 'committee will
prepare a report to be submitted to
the members, and announcement will
be made of the prospectus for the com-
ing season.
Keliher to Be Toastmaster of Dinner
Lester Keliher,'14E,will act as toast-
master at the combined seinor engi-
neer-lit dinner at the Union tomorrow
night, in place of George Ballantine,
who resigned on account of being elec-
ted toastmaster of the annual senior
engineer banquet. Professor Graham
will represent the engineering faculty
in place of Prof. Hoad, who will be un-
able to be present. Prof. R. M. Wenley
will represent the lit faculty. Kenneth
Westerman, A. O. Williams, Bruce
Miles and Russell Mills will furnish
musical numbers. Reservations have
been made for 200 guests. Course
tickets or tickets on sale at the door
for 60 cents will admit.
Deutscher Verein Will Initiate Soon
The Deutscher Verein will initiate its
new members in the Verein room Fri-
day evening, March 27, at 7:30 o'clock.
Immediately following, an initiation
dance will be given in Barbour gym-
nasium. These new members were
chosen at the spring election held last
Monday evening.

TO TALK AT MAJESTIC

Big Red Men Previously Won
Tale, Conquerors of
Princeton.

From

(Courtesy Detroit News.)
PITTSBURG, PA., March 21.-Cor-
nell easily defeated Michigan in the
special two mile relay race, which
featured the fourth annual meet of the
Pittsburg Athletic Association in Du-
quesne Gardens tonight in 8 minutes
and 4 seconds, which is considered
good time on the flat track.
As Cornell defeated Yale two weeks
ago, and the "Elis" had previously
beaten Princeton in record time, the
Ithaca team is conceded the collegiate
indoor championship. Michigan is
considered the strongest team in the
west, and won the two mile race at the
Pennsylvania relay carnival last year.
Ex-Captain Haff gained a ten yard
lead on Souder in the first lap; but
Irish turned this into a 12 yard margin
for Cornell in the second lap at the
expense of Griest, who lost 22 yards.
Murphy ran a close race in his first
quarter, but Potter gained about 30
yards in the third relay, running away
from the Wolverine youngster in the
second quarter of this relay.
Caldwell, the Olympic star of the
Cornell team, started on the fourth re-
lay with a lead of about 42 yards, run-
ning a good first quarter, but loafing
the rest of the way, and easily winning
the race from Jansen, the Michigan
star.
Brown, the Michigan alternate, won
the 1,000 yard race from Marshall, of
the University of Pittsburg, by ten
yards. Carroll, of the Indiana Normal
school, equalled the world's record of
Archie Hahn of 6 2-5 seconds in the
50 yard dash.
1rAULBETSClL IS SUFFERING
INFECTION FROM LEG WOUND
John F. Maulbetsch, '17P, captain
of the freshman football team, is suf-
fering from an infected shin bone,
which he received in a wrestling match
recently. The wound is being treated
by Dr. May who asserts that a speedy
healing is only possible through the
most careful attention.
No Change in Condition of Allington
Dr. F. R. Waldron attending H. J.
Allington, '15E, who is suffering from
a severe throat infection at the St.
Joseph sanitarium, reported last night
that the condition of his patient was
unchanged. Injections of blood serum
have been discontinued.
Allington's mother arrived in the
city Thursday, from California. His
father and two brothers have been
with him constantly.

crippled with

an infected leg.

s of the department, I
ide in the loyal spirit
iversity, I think by ev-
nce the early nineties,
ss memorial. The re-
ily" seems to show a
it in some members of
1914. Is this class, of
f 20 years, the first to
contribute the small
ach man, for such a

CORNELL BESTS
MICHIGAN TEAM.
IN RELAY. RACE
Feature Two Mile Pittsburg Event
Goes to Crack Easterners on
Flat Track; Time-
8 Min. 4 Sec.
BROWN TAKES DISTANCE RUN
FROM MARSHALL BY 10 YARDS

THREE WRESTLING
TITLES AWARDED
Watson, Traub and Harris Conquer in
Final Mat Matches Yesterday
Afternoon
LIGHTWEIGHTS DISPLAY SKILL
R. W. Watson, '16, gained the title
of heavyweight wrestling champion of
the campus, yesterday afternoon, by
virtue -of his victory over J. C. Camp-
bell, '16L, in a ten minute scuffle. Wat-
son started at his opponent with a
rush, and after failing on two good
holds, pressed Campbell's shoulders to
the mat on the third grip.
Traub was awarded the light-
weight decision by the judges after his
tussle with Baker, which went the thir-
ty minute limit. Baker displayed won-
derful skill at breaking Traub's holds,
but the judges decided that Traub
showed the more aggressiveness.
Harris gets the middleweight title,
due to the inability of Maulbetsch to
wrestle. Maulbetsch is temporarily

DOZEN MEN WORK
OUT FOR INFIELD
A constantly shifting lineup featured
the infield workout of the baseball
squad yesterday afternoon, a dozen
athletes appearing at the different sta-
tions.
The veterans started at all positions
except first, Howard being absent.
Dwyer again showed class there; Gra-
ham appeared for the first time, hold-
ing down third after Hughitt's hand
forced him to quit.
Captain Sisler took a workout at
first, and "Johnny" Lavans and "King",
Lehr, the big leaguers practicing with
the squad, both appeared at short after
Baker had his fill. McQueen and La-
bodie divided things at second,. with
Baer, Hippler and Benton all working
at the plate.
ANNUAL WOMEN'S BANQUET
WILL BE' HELD THURSDAY
Preceded by the junior girls' play,
which will be given in the afternoon,
the women's banquet will be held
Thursday night, at 6:00 o'clock in Bar-
bour gymnasium. This the largest af-
fair of its kind during the year, and
contrary to custom there will be three
men present.
Pres. Emeritus J. B. Angell, Presi-
dent Hutchins, and Gov. W. N. Ferris
are the men honored to respond to
toasts. Florence Barnard, '95, of S.g-
-inaw, will act as toastmaster.
Banquet tickets will sell for 50 cents,
and may be secured from members of
the committee: Grace McDonald, '14,
Bertrice Hopkins, '14, Elsie Paul, '17,
Ida Lewis, '16, Helen Moore, '15, and
Romaine Bramwell, '15, Dean of Wom-
en M. B. Jordan will have charge of
the tickets for alumnae, faculty la-
dies, league houses, ministers wives,
and sororities.
IRITIS KEEPS PROF. BOGLE
FROM MEETING HIS CLASSES
Prof. T. A. Bogle, of the law depart-
ment, will not be able to meet his
classes in Common Law Pleading,Mon-
day and Tuesday on account of serious
eye trouble. Prof. E. C. Goddard, will
meet his classes in agency on these
two days, at Professor Bogle's hours.
Professor Bogle has been suffering
for some time past with iritis and was
forced to postpone his classes the first
of the semester because of the trouble.
Just how long Professor Bogle will be
forced to remain away from his classes
cannot be determined.

KOHLER'S CLAN
TAMES STURDY
SE WARDS BAN,
Squad Led by Track Captain Caph
Honors in Listless Meet,
Figures Being
56 to to
DISTANCE EVENTS CHANGE
CLOSE RACE TO WALK-Au
Short Dash and the Two Hurdle R
Develop Only Close
Competition
Contrary to expectations, the Var
meet last night, was a one sided aff
the squad led by Captain Kohler v
ning by a score of 56 to 30. The
competition resulted in poor marks
most of the events..
In the first few events the teams
neck and neck in the tally column,
the distance runs turned the tide he
ily in favor of the Kohlers.
'The short dash and hurdle ra
proved the most closely contes
events of the evening, the crowd dis
proving of the judges decision in g
ing Seward a tie with Smith in the
yard dash. In the high hurdles AJ
strong was awarded a hairline decis
over Corbin, but the freshman ca
back with a good win in the low b
riers.
Cross, the freshman shot putter, '
not able to force Kohler to exert h:
self, but the youngster made his b
put of the year, heaving the sixt
pound weight more than forty f4
Waterbury was the other youngs
whose performance in the high ju
gives Trainer Farrell considera
hopes for next year's team.
The summaries follow:
Shot put-Koher (K), first; Cr
(S), second; Phelps (S), third. I.
tance-43 feet 4 in.
35 yard dash-Seward (),and Sn
(K), tied for first; Bond (K), th:
Time-4 1-5 see.
High jump-Waterbury (K), fir
Zavitz (S) and Berray (K), tied
second. Distance-5 feet 9 in.
Pole vault-Cook (S), first; Cr
(K) and Kessler (K), tied for sec
Neight-10 ft. 9 in.
45 yard high hurdles-Armstr
(K), first; Corbin (5), second; Tht
ton (K), thi'd. Time-5 4-5 sec.
35 yard low hurdles-Corbin (
first; Armstrong (K), second; C
(S), third. Time-5 2-5 sec.
440 yard dash-John (K), first;A
spurger (S), second; Donnelly 4
third. Time-54 4-5 sec.
880 yard run-Lamey (K), first;
Ion (K), second; Gregory (S), th
Time-2 minutes 5 4-5 sec.
Mile run-Fox (K), first; Watt (
second; Graumann (S), third. Tim
4 min. 39 2-5 seconds.
Relay-Kohlers (Burby, Fonts
Kurtz, and Smith), first; ;9ewa
(Becker, Herrick, Hughes, and S
adr), second. Time-1 min. 55 1-5
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
WILL OCCUPY MASON HA

No doubt a few find it hard to add
another dollar to the budget, but I am
told the objections to a memorial do
not come chiefly from them. My re-
gret at this action of the class is the
keenest, because in recent years the
memorial has taken the form of a loan
fund for worthy and needy students.'
To my knowledge, if past classes had
not left such a fund, the class of 1914
Would now be lacking several of its
best members. Indeed, I was informed
some months ago, by one who knows,
that more men in this class have been
helped from this loan fund, than in
any class of recent years, and I per-
sonally know of this situation because
two of its members, with fine records
as men, told me within a week, that
they must have a loan to enable them
to graduate in June. I was glad to be
able to give one of them a little help.
Apparently, if the present class would
vote a memorial, in the form of an ad-
dition to the loan fund and pay it at
once, it could be used to relieve the
pressing need of some of its own wor-
thy members. Incidentally it could
keep up a fine tradition of a generous
spirit and an unselfish devotion to the
university, which gives its students
their professional training at a frac-
tion of the actual cost to the state.
I notice that the class meeting was
not largely attended and I must think

,Ii .

11'

DDREQDVTEDIAM C or. Division
and Huron Sts.
REV. LEONARD A. BARRETT, Pastor.
Roy HAMILTON, Student Pastor

Although nothing definite has 1
decided regarding the use to w
Mason hall will be put, when the
science building has been complE
it is said that the building will be n
into a permanent home for the Ed
tional department. This departn
which is at present located partl
the History building, has been ha
capped to a considerable extent b3
lack of quarters, and if this progra
followed, it will give Michigan's "
agogues" sufficient space to take
of expansion for some time to com

10;30 A. M.-Morning Service
6:30-Christian Endeaver

An Old Graduate. -_

,

_________________________ __

Union Guild

Series

zora

S.

avis

CONGREGATIONA

CHURCH

President of Chicago Theological Sezmin2.ry

TONIGHT

7:45 R. M.

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