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March 08, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-08

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e

I'

lichigan

Daily

T

,-
" - --

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 8, 1914.

PRICE

__

A I
FTION
Y SQUAD

Makes Third Big
Candidates, And
izen, Players
di List

Cut 1

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Mr. L. P. ?Moore lectures at Majestic
theater, 6:30 o'clock,
Mr. Dan Poling addresses combined
young people's societies,Presbyterian
church, 6:30 o'clock.
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
lectures on "China," Newberry hall,
4:30 o'clock.
Mr. J. A. Leonard speaks on Wesleyan
guild series, Methodist Episcopal
church, 7:30 o'clock.
Mr. Washington Gladden speaks on
Union guild series, Presbyterian
church, 7:45 o'clock.
Mr. Clyde R. Webster speaks on week-
ly Sunday afternoon entertainment,
Michigan Union, 3:00 o'clock.
Rabbi Louis J. Kopald speaks to the
Jewish Student's Congregation, Or-
pheum theater, 7:00 o'clock.
Mrs. Dwight Patter speaks at the
Westminster guild meeting, 3:30
o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

MAY FESTIVAL IS
TOPIC OF INTEREST
New Plans Include an Added Concert
in Form of Organ
Recital
SEAT SALE ,ST1RT TO'IMORROW1

Fat Men's Relay Proves to Be
Event of the Gym
Contest
NEW VAULTING RECORD

Feature

MADE

I

DUB'S TRACK MEET
SCOOPED BY SOPHS

I First honors and the bag of apples
Since the Paderewski concert, which were captured by the sophomores in
closed the pre-festival series last the dub interclass meet in Waterman
Monday night, interest in musical af- gym ,last evening. The climax of ex-

CORY,
FOR TEAM

Lnnains Before Training
rough the South
aster Recess
eeks of work behind the
and exactly one month
>re Michigan plays her
ich Carl Lundgren yes-
on made the third and
>f the year. An even
tossers were rubbed
y list, including one
atchers, two first base-
baseman, a short stop,
.d candidates.
practice marked the
he indoor training sea-
oach has 38 men from
the squad to take south
training trip during the
The candidates for the
tributed among the va-
as follows: 16 battery
ers, and 8 gardeners.
men dropped from the
ty was John W. Cory,
der of last year's team.
-o years at Cornell Col-
before coming to Mich-
k.B. degree of the west-
is recognized by Mich-

All-Fresh smoker,
7:00 o'clock.

Michigan Union,I

Prof. Suouck Hurgronje lectures in
Alumni memorial hall, 4:15 o'clock.
HAMILTON CONTEST
TERMINATES INTIE.

Blanshard Chosen by Judges Vote
3-2; Elsie Seitz Wins
High Honors

of

fairs has centered upon the twenty-
first annual May festival, to be held in
Hill auditorium on May 13, 14, 15 and
16.
In general, the plan of the last May
festival will be followed. This year,
however, a sixth concert will be ad-
ded to the festival in the form of an
organ recital, for which Miss Inez
Barbour, soprano, has been engaged
as a second attraction. As usual, the
Chicago Symphony orchestra will take
part in all of the concerts except the
organ recital. This year an orchestra
of 70 men will appear, instead of the
customary 65.
The policy inaugurated last year of
having a chorus of school children
take part in the Friday afternoon con-
cert will be followed again. A char-
acteristic work by Benoit, "Into the
World," has been decided upon. The
Choral Union of 300 voices will offer
as their contribution Handel's "Messi-
ah" on Thursday evening, and Elgar's
"Caractacus" on Saturday evening.
A splendid list of soloists has been
engaged, consisting of Inez Barbour,
Alma Gluck, and Florence Hinkle, so-
pranos; Margaret Keyes, contralto;
Riccardo Martin and Lambert Murphy,
tenors; Pasquale Amato and Reinald
Werrenrath, baritones; Henry Scott,
bass; and Earl V. Moore, organist.
Tomorrow morning at 8:00 o'clock,
at the school of music, the sale of the
course rservejl seat tickets wN, b!-:
gin. At this time Block A, consisting
of sections II-I-IV on the main floor
and the first six rows in the balcony,
will be offered to the public at $6.50
each, or $3.50 each if the "cover cou-
pon" of the pre-festival ticket is ex-
changed. On Saturday, March 14, all
unsold seats in Block A will be reduc-
ed to $6.00 each, or $3.00 each if the
pre-festival "cover coupon" is ex-
changed. Block B and C will be plac-
ed on sale March 16 and 23 respect-
ively.
SCHIOEFFEL VS. WEBB CASE
SETTLED IN COURT FRIDAY

citement was reached when the fat
men's relay was called. The cham-
pions of averdupois, however, failed
to put a dent in the gymnasium rec-
ord.
Two marks only would contrast fa-
vorably with those in the summaries
of the regular meets. In the 35 yard,
dash, Becker crossed the floor in 4 2-5
seconds; which is the time made in
the Fresh-Soph met last Saturday.
Wilson won the pole vault at 11 ft. 6
in., and was the individual point win-
ner. On a fourth trial he made 11 ft.
8 in., which is better than the gym
record.
Judging by the number of entries in
the low hurdles the appetite for apple
pies must have been general, as five
constituted the prize. Doughnuts evi-
dently were not held in such universal
esteem, as only four entered the high
hurdles.
The summaries follow:
16 pound shot put-Quail, first;
Graven second; Trissler, third. Dis-
tance 33 ft. 2 inches.
35 yard dash-Becker, first; Begole,
second; Stiver, third. Time 4 2-5 sec.
40 yard high hurdles-Wilson, first;
Becker and Valis tied for second. Time
6 sec.
35 yard low hurdles-Crumpacker,
first; Becker, second; Anderson, third.
Time 5 4-5 sec. '
Running high jump-Hammon and
Davis tied for first; Berry, third.
Height 5 feet, 6 inches.
Mile run-'Watlers, first; Trelfa, sec-
ond; Fuetterer, third. Time 4:55 2-5.
880 yard run-Dillon, first; Carson,
second; Hitts, third. Time 2:14 2-5.
440 yard dash-Darnell, first; Dig-
nan, second; Tunnell, third. Time
1:00:
Standing broad jump-Becker, first;
Zavitz, second; Cady, third. Distance
9 feet, 3 inches.
Pole vault-Wilson, first; Russell,
second; Height 11 feet.
Standing high jump-McCabe, first;
Zavitz, second; Berrey, third. Height
4 feet 4 inches.-

EXPERT ON MOHAN-MEDANISMf
TOELECTURE ON ITS ORIGIN
Lurking in forbidden Mecca in the
disguise of a Bedouin, Prof. Christian
Snouck-Hurgronje was able to observe
the Mohammedans in their holy city
and speaking Arabic, he was able to
learn much of the customs and rites of
the famous religion. His first lecture,
on "Some Points Concerning the Origin
of Islam," will be given at 4:15 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon in Alumni Memo-
rial hall
Taking a leave of absence from
Teyden university to learn more of
the source of the Islam religion, he
donned their clothes and took the
famous pilgrimage to Mecca. After
this experience he returned to Hol-
land. He was soon made minister to
the Dutch East Indian colonies.
PRESIDENT EMERIITUS ANGELL
WILL TALK THIS AFTERNOON
President-Emeritus James B. Angell
will talk on "China," in Newberry hall
at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon. Dr.
Angell was for two years special
American ambassador to China, and
his experience with the people there,
makes him especially fitted to talk on
that subject.

Complete

Rehearsal of Show
Held For First
Time

bster, Ph.B. '99,
on "Federal Crim-
is afternoon. Mr.
at district-attorney
of Michigan, hav-
ur J. Tuttle when
nted United States'
Taft. Mr. Webster
r of the Jackson
i Governor War-

After tryouts and elimination
tending over more than a mont
girls art students' and model cho
were announced yesterday, as fol
A. Bassett, '14E, J. R. Craine, '14
R. Dibble, '14E, D. Morrill, '16,
Murtha, L. C. Staudt, '15, J. B. A
'16, F. H. Begole, '16, P. Bowen,
John Finkenstaedt, '16E, L. E. Hu
'16E, D. W. Jennings, '16, J. C.
ble, '16E, S. T. Steen, '16E1. Su
tutes: L. Alexander, '16, A. R. Th
son, R. B. Stearns, '16, H. H. F
'16.
Regular subscribers of the
'will receive free copies of a four
Opera Extra, which will be deliv
tomorrow morning. The paper
tains a complete record of the o
"A Model Daughter," and a numb
features on various phases of oper
tivity. E. W. Haislip has charge c
extra.
Individual songs will be rehe-
this afternoon at 4:00 o'clock an
(Continued on page 5.)

CHORUS OF Al
STUDENTS A
MODELS CNN
Michigan Daily 4pera Extra
Out Tomorrow With Hi
of "A Model
Dlaughter"
CHIORtUS AND CAST TO ME
IN HILL AUDITORIUL-

c will be furnished by the Man-
lub trio and the "Prickly Heat"
t, comprising S. T. Alden, '17E,
McDuff, '17M, Donald H.
ke, '17M, and Frank Geanlur.
. M. C. A. Majestic Meeting
. Moore, of Chicago, Ill., will
at the Y. M. C. A. meeting in
ajestic theater at 6:30 o'clock
:. Although Mr. Moore is head
arge paint concern, he devotes
ire time to social service work
on several civic improve-
ommittees. As head of the Stu-
Conference at Lake Geneva for
rs, he is well known to college
This is his first appearance

FIRST WOMAN TO ENTER FINALS
Elsie C. Seitz, '14, tied with Paul
Blanshard, '14, in both rank and per-
centage at the university Hamilton
oratorical contest last night in Uni-
osity hall. The five judges, deciding
between the two contestants, with the
other three contestants eliminated
from consideration, then chose Blan-
shard by a vote of 3 to 2 to represent
Michigan against four other western
universities in the Hamilton contest at
Chicago, April 3. Miss Seitz is the
first woman ever to enter the finals for
the Hamilton contest at Michigan.
Blanshard last year won the Nation-
al Peace contest and was on the var-
sity debating team that beat Chicago.
He will be a strong representative
for Michigan, "said Professor True-
blood. His oration, "The Pulpit and
the Social Situation," is a call for uni-
versity men to enter the ministry.
Blanshard will be accompanied to
Chicago April 2 by Professor True-
blood. He will speak the next even-
ing in competition with delegates from
Wisconsin, Iowa, Indiana and North-
western universities. First and sec-
and prizes of $100 and $50, respective-
y,, will be awarded.
STADIUM MATERIAL BEGINS
TO ARRIVE AT FERRY FIELD
The first shipment of material for
he new concrete stadium, a quantity
of Florida lumber, arrived at Ferry
field yesterday. Machinery for the
large concrete mixer is on the field
ready to be set up tomorrow. A side
track from the Ann Arbor railroad
will be constructed south of the ten-
nis courts in order that all material
may be unloaded on< the site of the
stands. The first shipments of cement
will arrive this week.
Self Government Offices Recomimended
Recommendations for the establish-
ing of the self government committee
offices, as permanent positions to be
elected annually, will be made by the
self government committee to the
women's league at its next round ta-
ble meeting, Wednesday March 11.

Fat man's race (four lap relay)-
The replevin suit instituted by Carl Won by team composed of Reinmann,
G. Schoeffel, '13-'15L, and P. M. God- Griswold, Duryea and Millard. Time
ehn, '15L, against Mrs. F. J. Webb, 1:03.
Oakland avenue, for the recovery of
two trunks alleged to have been 'SOCIETY CLAIMS EMPLOYMENT
wrongfully withheld, was settled in AGENCY BENEFIT TO MEMBERS
Justice Thomas' court Friday morn-
ing. Senior engineers are urged to join
Attorney A. J. Sawyer, for the de- : the Michigan Engineering Society so
fense, pleaded in abatement, assigning they may be benefitted by its employ-
as cause the non-certification of the ,ment agency.Those who expect to work
writ by the officer serving it. The in Michigan are especially urged tc
court ruled that the writ should have join.An annual,containing the list of so-
been certified, but, in accordance with ciety members, from which the pros-
the ruling of the supreme court, the pective employers usually select men
suit would not abate, providing the will appear in April. Application
plaintiffs took out an alias writ and blanks may be obtained from Mr. S. J.
(Continued on page 5.) Hoexter, secretary of the association.
PRE BT "CToEr. Division
and Huron Sts.
REv. LEONARD A. BARRETT, Pastor.a
Roy HAMILTON, Student Pastor
10:30 A. M.-God and His World
6:30 P. M.-Talk by DR. POLING
7:45 P. M.--. Washington Gladden

ADVANCE SALE FOR
CONCERT IS HEAVY
Program Will Include Many Features
to Be Used on the Pacific
Coast Trip -
TO PRESENT "SAXOPHONE RAG"
With an advance ticket sale as heavy
as that for its last record-breaking
affair, the Glee and Mandolin club is
expecting to fill Hill auditorium for its
popular concert there "next Thursday
evening. The bill to be presented will
be entirely new. Most of the features
to be used on the long Pacific Coast
trip, in April, will be used for the
first time in Ann Arbor.
"Bill" Williams, star comedian with
the clubs on their western tour last
year, will be featured in a new skit.
Waldo Fellows, hit of the last concert,
will be present with novel songs and
a farcical monologue.
"Ain't it Great?" and "The Biliken
Song," two favorites introduced at the
junior girls' play, will be included in
the varied repertoire for Thursday
night's concert. George Becker, one
of the Glee club's star tenors, will be
given a solo role for one number.
Fred Lawton, '12, writer of numer-
ous Union opera successes, has writ-
ten a new song, just about to be pub-
lished, which he has deQWated to the
Glee and Mandolin club." The piece
will be used at this week's concert,
and it is expected that it will be fea-
tured on the western trip. Lawton's
"Laddie" will also receive flis first ren-
dition by the Glee club.
PAW ~phoneR ag," popularized
at the Union minstrels just before
Christmas, will be one of the principal
numbers on the program. "The Dance
of the Gnomes" is another of the many
features announced.
Tickets for the concert are now on
sale at the Michigan Union, and at
Wahr's and Sheehan's. A uniform
price of 25 cents for all seats will be
charged. The proceeds of the con-
certs will be used to enlarge the per-
sonnel of the trip club.
Students Suffer From Throat Trouble
H. J. Allington, '15E, is in St. Jog-
eph's sanitarium, and J. M. Barrett,
'16, has been forced.to leave for his
home in Fort Wayne, Ind., as the re-
sult of a slight epidemic -f throat
trouble that has affected several in the
Psi Upsilon house this last week.

I

I

FRESHE
MEET

(Detroit News Service)
The small track of the Detroit
cost the All-Fresh team the dual n
last night, the yearlings failing top;
in the half mile run, the last and de
ing event of the evening. The
score was 41 1-2 to 39 1-2 against
first year runners, but trainer Fa
had the satisfaction of seeing his yo
sters capture two of the four new
ords which were set for the "Y" ti
Carroll smashed the mile recor
4:58 2-5, and Cross put the 12 po
shot 47 feet 7 1-2 inches for anc
mark. Jans put the freshmen ou
the running in the half mile by s
ping the 880 in 2:16 2-5; and also
a new mark in the quarter.
The summaries follow:
Pole vault-Reith (Y), first; Ke:
(M), second; Wilson (Y), t
Heighth 10 feet 6 inches.
25 yard dash-O'Brien (M), i
Stanley (Y), second; Fontana
third. Time 3 3-5 seconds.
440 yard dash-Jans (Y), I
Fleming (Y), second; Stevens
third. Time 61 seconds. (Record
25 yard low hurdles-Thurston
first; Wyatt (Y), second; Corbin
third. Time-3 4-5 seconds.
Mile run-Carroll (M), first; Se
(Y), second; Gorauman (M), t
Time 4:58 2-5. (Record.)
25 yard high hurdles-Thurston
first; Wyatt (Y), second; Corbin
third. Time 3 4-5 seconds.
High jump-Waterby (M), 3
Watkins (Y), second; Cook (Y), t
Heighth 5 feet 9 1-2 inches.
12 pound shot put-Cross (M),
McDonald (Y), second; Leach
third. Distance 47 feet, 7 1-2 in
(Record.)
Half mile run-Jans (Y),
Fleming (Y), second; Tumley
third. Time 2:16 2-5.

1 Arbor audience.'
:10 o'clock will
ad special music

Motion
precede
is to be

Union Guild Services
he Reverend Washington Gladden,
w., ill deliver the address, on the
on Guild series in the Presbyterian
rch at 7:45 o'clock tonight. After
ing for 30 years as head of the
;t Congregational church of Colum-
Ohio, Dr. Gladden was made pas-
emeritus and was succeeded by
Carl Patton, formerly of Ann Ar-
Dr. Gladden has lectured in Uni-
(Continued on page 6.)

A

,.. f T

_ fM tl . , ...

I Union Guild

a2shington

Gladden D. D.

PRESBYTEF
CHORCH

Series

Of +Coltxmbuxs Ohio

TI

GHT

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