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March 03, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-03

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II

7 t

C

gan

a

. 105.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 1914.

PRICE F

S HELP
.1ST MEN
NION ROLL
lp Campaign Among
pus Postponed Till
rganization

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Soph engineer smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7: 10 o'clock.
Mathematical club dinner, Michigan
Union, 6:00 o'clock.
"Dolly ReformingIherself," Whitney
theater, 8:15 o'clock.
Senior Homeops dinner-dance, Pack-
ard academy, 6:30 o'clock.
Mr. Iden Payne will address members
of Drama league, Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall, 2:30 o'clock.
Twilight organ recital by L. L. Ren-
wick, Hill auditorium, 4:15 o'clock.
Junior lits, pay class dues, economics
building.
EVENTS0 OF TOMORROW

VARSITY TRACK
STARS BARRED
AT 'DUB' MEET
Ifegulars atd All-Fresh Athletes Are
Ruled Out of Inter-Class
jFray Billed Saturday
A fternoon
i'JG ARS, ('14ARETT[ES, CANDY,
ARE NOVEL PRIZES OFFERED
Campus Relaty Championships Begin
on Same Night as Events
For Amateur Racers
Entries for the interclass meet,
which will be held in Waterman gym-
nasium Saturday afternoon and even-
ing, will close WVednesday night. Any-
one is eligible to enter the competition

UNION PLAN IS
TO FIND POSTS
FOR GRADUATES

Directors Suggest Establishment
Employment Bureau With
Salaried Man
at Head

JUNIOR ENGINEER EXPELLE D
FO T E FRMPOESOR
C.L. Hlsel Is Dishlonorably Dismissed
Folloi'wngflHis confession
of Act
C. L. Helsel, '15F, was given a dis-
honorable dismissal by the engineer-
ing faculty, Friday afternoon, for the
theft of a book. The disappearance of
books has been noticed for some time,
and the climax was reached when Prof.
A. H. Lovell, of the electrical engi-
neering faculty, found his name stamp-
ed on a page in a book in the posses-
sion of Helsel. Helsel admitted he
took the book from the desk of Mr.
Lovell several days before and that he
had overlooked the stamped page.

of

C OACH STAR1
TUTORING
MIT HAND
First Accident of Season
Yesterday's Practice Wh
Tip hits Catcher Wy
in Collar Bone.
X-RAY EXAMINATION 01
FOR PLAYER BY DOC
'
Rippler Shows IUp Well 1
Exhibition Staged ilo
by Lundgren.
An accident marred thei
individual Instruction givex
ball squad by Coach Lundg
day afternoon. During the

in Men Everywhere
of 13 business men, un-
on of Mr. George Millen,
iting the student cam-
n life memberships by
the local townspeople
asted in the welfare of
el of the committee is
J. Abbott, Waldo Ab-
angford, Charles Sink,
Manly Osgood, George
oyce, Dr. Theron Lang-
merman, W. H. Butler
on.
tee has been at work
lay, and expects to sub-
>rt tomorrow noon. One
:ee has already landed
>ssibilities submitted to
her men refuse to make
s until their time limit
the students-is tempor-
ebb, owing to the fact
committee is being re-
eavor to cover the stu-
not yet been approach-
sition. In this manner
ian, Cyril Quinn, '14,
some definite report
: enrolV-i as a member

Prof. C. L. Meader lectures on "Rus-.
sia," Newberry hall, 4:30 o'clock.
Colorado club smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 7:30 o'clock.
Public student's recital, Frieze Memo-
rial hall, 4:15 o'clock.
MAY, 28-29 SET AS
TIME OF EREGATTA
Tentative Plans Announced for Annual
Event of Union Boat Club
by Parsons

COM ITTEE IS APPOINTED TO
INVE STIC AT:E PROPOSAL
1wny Prominent Alumni Would Help
to Keep Positions Throughout
Country Filed
An emiployment bureau for alumni
is the latest plan of the Michigan Un-
ion. It was brought up at the meet-
ing of the board of directors, held at
tho Union yesterday noon, and was
put in the hands of a committee which
will report at the next meeting near
the end of the month.
The plan, as suggested, is for the
Union to conduct a regular employ-
ment office with a salaried man in
charge. It would be the duty of the

OI(USIDE

CREWS MAY

COMPETEI

Tentative plans for the big regatta
to be held by the Union Boat club,
Friday and Saturday, May 29, and 30,
were announced yesterday by Henry
S. Parsons, general chairman.
M. A. C. is scheduled to cross bats
with Michigan on both the above dates,
and an attempt is being made to have
the spring contests held at that time.
The regatta will begin immediately
after the ball game Friday, at which
time the preliminaries in the water
events will bo held. These. will take

who is not on probation or a member
of the Varsity or All-Fresh squads.
Director Rowe has had charge of
the arrangements for the meet, and has
made many changes from last year's
interclass affair. It has been his idea
to make it a meet for the "dubs," the
men that have never had the training
or experience of those on the Varsity
and All-Fresh squads. In the selec-
tion of prizes for the winners of the
first three places he has also departed
from ancient custom. Cigars, cigar-
ettes and candy will be the feature
awards on Saturday night.
The interclass relay races will start
on the evening of the meet, and will
probably be wedged in between some
of the events on the gym floor. The
various class managers are urged to
send out calls for candidates and to
arrange with Rowe for tryouts at the
gym. Drawings will be held on Fri-.
day to determine the dates on which
the teams will be matched, and an-
nouncement of the results will appear
Saturday morning.
Varsity men have been barred for
the first time from competing in the
interclass . relays, and as they have
been instrumental in winning for their
teams in the past, the outcome of both
the meet and the relay series is doubt-
ful. The classes will be representedj
Saturday by men whose performances
are unknown, and this factor is being
relied upon to arouse keen rivalry be-
tween the contenders.
Instead of running off all the events
in the evening, Rowe has planned to1
get the preliminary heats out of thea
way in the afternoon. The finals for
all events will come in the evening.

Noted War Surgeon Visits Ann Arbor
Dr. N. M. Serkoff a noted physician
of Moscow, Russia, who served in the
Russo-Japanese war, was the guest of
Dr. IV, B. Hinsdale, dean of the homne-
opathic medical college, Satuirday Dr.
Serkoff was the Russian delegate to
the International Homeopathic Coun-
cil.
PADEREWSKI PLAY
Noted Pianist Delights Audience Which
Packs Hill Auditorium to
. Capacity

department to keep a file of jobs of all,
kinds throughout the United States.
As there are many alumni who are
now leaders in nearly all kinds of
work, it is thought that there will al-
ways be a large number of available
positions.
The bureau would be of especial
help to men in out-going senior class-
es. At present a large number of grad-
uates are uncertain as to what they will
do, and take about the first job which
comes their way. By such an agency
as the Union is planning, a large ma-
jority of these men would be given an
opportunity to secure positions, which
would be not only more remunerative,
but niore io their taste.
The service would not be restricted
to seniors, however, for any alumnus
when out of work would be welcome
to the service of the Union bureau in
finding suitable employment.
IDEN PAYNE PLAYERS WILL4
APP1EAR AT WHVITEY TODAY

l PIA ISI+

ACOUSTICS

OF HALLI

ting practice in the cage
struck catcher Edgar P. Wy
on the collar bone, necessi
retirement from the workoi
A preliminary examinatic
May resulted in Wyman's 1
to the university health s
an X-ray examination, as
of the collar bone is consid
likely.
Although not winning his
year Wyman is considered
veteran, as he remained o
ceiving staff alllastseas(
Baer the only regular lef
Hippler were counted on
Coach' Lundgren. Should
injury prove serious, it wi
earliest appearance of the
jinx in many years.
Following the battery pra
terday Lundgren began
coaching. He chose the c
work with yesterday, himsel
ing in the batters position a
a- fake swing at the throw
of the hurlers. The catche

Variety was the outstanding feature
of the program which Ignace Pader-
ewski set forth at his concert last
night, before the largest audience that
ever assembled in Hill auditorium. As
a rule artists are in special rapport
with a particular composer or form of
expression. But Paderewski is re-
markable for his catholicity. - fi was
equally at home with Bach, Beethoven,
Schumann, and Liszt. In one instant
.he made the piano resound with the
vibratory beauty of the human voice,

INCREASE
AT UNIVERSITY

ox. tWe enineer-
igan shows the
ay school in the
r of students en-
-ent of civil en-

Cornell, which leads the list of total
idents in the three upper classes of
'il engineers, with 396, has a slight
crease in enrollment this year. Mich-
-i stands second with 276, an in-
ease of 56. Then follow Massachu-
ts Institute of Technology, Renn-
aer Polytechnic Institute, Illinois,
lifornia, Wisconsin, Purdue, and
nnsylvania, in order. Most of these
pools show an actual decrease in the
rollment of civil engineers.
'RIL 24 1, SETTLED UPON
AS.DATE FOR GERMAN PLAY
April 24 has finally been settled up-
as the date for the annual German
.y, to be given under the auspices
the Deutscher Verein. The cast
d its first rehearsal yesterday, and
1 continue to meet regularly under
ection of officers of the Verein.
0D WRITES FOR LAW REVIEW.
reh Number of University Magazine,
Has Articles by Leading
Judges.

place at the bend of the river above
Tessemers, and will include swim-
ming, diving and canoe races. A dance
will be held at the Union in the ev-
ening.
The finals in all water events will
be held Saturday afternoon, and prizes
will be given to the winners of
the various contests. Negotiations are
under way with Detroit and Grand
Rapids crews, with the end in view of
staging special shell races.
A huge water carnival is planned
for the evening, music for which will
be furnished by the glee and mando-
lin clubs and the university band.
Members of the boat club will be ad-
mitted free to all the events.
BOXING PROVES POPULAR IN
WATERMAN GYMNASUM CLASS
Sufficient interest has been manifes-
ted in 'the boxing instruction available
at Waterman gymnasium to practically
insure the success of the experiment,
according to Dr. May. More than 30
students are taking private lessons
from O. S. Westerman, who is in
charge of the department. There is
still room for additional appointments.
SENIOR PICTURES ARE SENT
TO MINNEAPOLIS ENGRAVERS

and the next, with the imposing elo-

oach,
to the

ORATORICAL TRYOiTS WON
BY BRADY ANI) MISS SEITZ
H. A. Brady, '14, and Elsie C. Seitz,
'14, were the sucecssful orators in the
first of the preliminaries held for the
Hamilton Oratorical contest yester-
day. A second preliminary will be
held at 8:00 o'clock tonight in the ora-
tory room, 302 University hall, at
which time three more will be selected
for the final. Those entered for this
contest are: Isadore Becker, '15, Paul
B. Blanshard, '14, B. J. Jonkman, '14L,
J. H. Klinger, '15, Myer Lavine, '17, W.
I. McKenzie and J. A. Phelps, '15.
WORK GANG CLEARING SITE;
MAY BUILD RESIDENCE HALL

a
i
J
1
r

"Dolly Reforming Herself," one of
Henry Arthur Jones' plays, will be
presented by the Iden Payne English
players under the auspices of the Dra-
ma League at the Whitney theater this
evening. "Lonesome Like," a one
act comedy, will also be given by the
company as a curtain raiser. The
performance will be open to the gen-
eral public.
Mr. B. Iden Payne will deliver a
lecture at Sarah Caswell Angell hall
this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock to the
Ann Arbor branch of the Drama
League. Mr. Walter Hampden and Mr.'
Whitford Kane will also give short
talks. Only members of the League
and affiliated clubs will be admitted

i

quence of an orchestra.
Beethoven's sonata in EF' fiat gave w
Pad.erewski every opportunity to re-Ii
veal his wonderful resources. No pre- 1
vious interpretation of this fascinating it
work in Ann Arbor, can be said to
have revealed so fully its spirit. In d
the shorter pieces, Paderewski exhib- c
ited a clearness of tone and fluency of o
execution that is' impossible to de-
scribe. Few pianists combine such i
bril'iant technic with such intellectual
force.
In an interview after the concert;
Pad-vrewski extolled Hill auditorium.
"I am enchanted," he said, wit" a(
you'r new hall. The acoustics are p(#-to
feet, and for comfort, I have never seen o
it surpassed. This is my second visi b
to Ann Arbor, and I may say thatfe,
visits have ever given me great (C
pleasure." -
DEA N BATES TO OPEN NEW
COURSE IN LAW FOR WOMEN c

;ling and
season.
ra no

The

Lits Are to Be Given 49 Pages for Cuts
of 440 Members of 1914
Class

Professor J. R. Rood, of the law
department, has contributed an ar-
ticle on "Torrens. System of Land
Registration," to the March issue of
the Michigan Law Review to be out
in a few days. Among the other prom-
inent donators are Judge Perkins, of
Grand Rapids, writing an article on
"Procedural Reform," and Judge Her-
bert Harley, on the "Courts of On-
tario."
Bonilla Will Speak of South America
John A. Bonilla, '15M, president of
the Cosmopolitan club, will give a
public lecture at the -Presbyterian
church tomorrow evening at 7:30
o'clock. His subject will be "South
America, its posibilities and its re-
sources." W. C. Achi, '14, will play a:
violin selection before the address.

Senior pictures for the 1914 Michi-
ganensian were sent yesterday to the
Bureau of Engraving, Minneapolis,
Minn., where cuts will be made. One
thousand and thirty-four photographs
were received from all the depart-
ments, and will occupy 118 pages of
the annual.
The 440 lits will be allotted 49 pag-
es; 216 engineers will be allotted 24
pages; 196 laws will have 22 pages;
35 medics, 4 pages; 22 pharmics, 3
pages; 20 homeops, 3 pages; 25 sen-
ior nurses, 3 pages; and 12 homeo-
pathic nurses are to have 2 pages.
All art work has been selected and
illustrations were also forwarded to
the engravers yesterday. The cuts,
when completed, will be sent to Ihling
Brothers, Everard, of Kalamazoo,
Mich., as this firm has contracted for
the printing of the yearbook.

By tearing down the half burned
structure at the corner of North Uni-
versity avenue and Twelfth street, the
university will have its property in
that part of the city cleared for build-,
ing purposes. The second of the res-
idence halls for women will probably
be built on this site, due to its prox-
imity to Barbour gym.
"Fast" N uniber of Gargoyle is Popular.
Reports on Gargoyle sales indicate a
larger demand for the "Fast" number
than for any other issue of the year.
Of the 1100 copies printed for the
public, nearly 800 have already been
purchased.
Professor Scott to Lecture in Detroit
Prof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric de-
partment, will deliver an address be-
fore the Collegiate. Alumnae associa-
tion of Detroit, on Saturday, March 11.
His subject will be "Two Journalisti'
Failings."

OPERA POSTERS ON SALE;
MELTON HEARS REHEARSAL
Moritz Recovers From Illness-Cast
to Start Work on Second
Act Today
Posters for the opera will be placed
on sale this noon at several of the
stores about the city. The design is
the work of D. M. Cottrell, '14A, and
has been printed in three colors, grey,
purple and black.
George Moritz, '15, who is playing
the title role in the cast, has recovered
from a rather severe attack of bron-
chial trouble, and resumed active work
at yesterday's rehearsal. W. R. Mel-
ton, '13, was also present and offered
a number of helpful suggestions. Work
on the second act will be taken up this
afternoon at 4:00 o'clock by the cast.
The chorus will hold a rehearsal to-
night at which all those eligible for
the final choice should be present.
Slips entitling the holder to pur-
chase six tickets for any one perform-
ance, of the show, will be given out
next Monday at the Union. It was
finally decided at yesterday's meeting
of the board of directors to charge
$2.00 for the best seats at the Friday
night show and $1.50 for all other pre-
sentations.

Dean H. M. Bates, of the law de-
partment, will open the new law
course for women with an introductory
lecture at 4:00 o'clock tomorrow af-
ternoon, in room C of the law building.
The course, which will comprise ten
lectures by prominent members of the
law faculty, was designed for the
purpose of acquainting university
women with the commoner phases of
law, such as they might be likely to
encounter in ordinary business deal-
ings and contracts. It is open to none
but women regularly enrolled in tht
university. Admission cards must be
secured from Dean Jordan, Dean K. E.j
Guthe, or Registrar A. G. Hall. No
credit will be given for the course.
Hegner to Talk at Port Huron March 9I
Prof.R.W. Hegner,of the Zoology de-
partment, will deliver an extension
lecture on "The Home Life of Wild
Birds," at Port Huron on Monday,
March 9. This lecture is illustrated
with seventy-five lantern slides select-
ed from hundreds of photographs of
the nests, eggs, and young and adult
wild birds, which Professor Hegner
has collected during the past fifteen
years.

The

(ana, On

Chicago.
gamna an
the 1912
Graduate
J. Selig
Daily staf
success i
Aboard fo
in "HighJ
V1- -o

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