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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1914 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

LLET PU!

'IPS

Large Amateur Finishers agree that Tank
Development for Films gives more detail and
better contrast than the old hand method-and
there is not the inclination to slight the work in a rush, while the chances
of scratching the emulsion is practically eliminated.
In tank development the developer is easily kept at the proper temperature and
strength, which is very essential but almost impossible in any other method. It will
pay you to consider our methods in fixing and washing, as well. ItNs rather expen-
sive for you when your films are spoiled in developing. Better bring them to me and
make sure. If you want we'll show you how it's done here. LYNDON

I

FRESHA

LET THE

Are Best for the Tanga

Press Your Clothes

~ ~..

TRY THEM
REGAL SHOES

mwmg

..1

& CO.

"03 S. MAIN STREET
ANN ARBOR

JANUARY SALE
ON ALL MILLINERY

HARDSON

115 Liberty East

166
They AllAdmit
we are
"Just a little better"
SO WILL -YOU
ICE CREAM, CANDIES, LUNCHEONS
PROMPT DELIVERY SERVICE
116S. Main St.

WRESTLERS START
THEIR TOURNAMENT
The first three matches in the uni-
versity wrestling tournament-two
heavyweights and one lightweight--
took place yesterday afternoon in the
presence of about 100 spectators. No
one match required more than six
minutes to decide a winner, despite the
fact that all the contestants display-
ed aggressiveness.
The first tussle between F. D. Quail,
'16, and J. C. Campbell, '16L, heavy-
weights, was captured by the latter at
the end of six minutes. Quail appear-
ed more aggressive from the start but
a tricky hold on Campbell's part got
the decision.
The second encounter brought D. L.
Perkins, '17E, and F. B. Stebbins, '17,
together. Their weight enabled them
to hustle about more than the heavy-
weights and Perkins' success was
largely due to Stebbins' exhaustion.
In the final match G. A. Grabe, '16,
floored W. A. Nieman, '17.
George W. Lichtner, '14E, who is in
charge of the tournament, ha announc-
ed the next matches for Wednesday,
March 4. he remaining matches will
be staged every Wednesday and Sat-
urday.
FAST NUMBER OF GARGOYLE
IS DECLARED "BEST EVER"
Consensus of opinion declares the
Fast number of the Gargoyle, put on
sale yesterday afternoon, the best issue
of the year. With unfailing dexterity
it glides over thin ice without once
dipping below the crust of clean hu-
mor. All that is typical of motion,
whether it be the tango, aerial naviga-,
tion, or the chaffeur has been repre-
sented by word or picture in the cur-
rent number.
Full page illustrations by F. A.

fee Roasters and
Wholesale Grocers

E. D. Kinne S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
President Cashier V. President
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
of Ann Arbor, Mich.
Capital $100,000.
Surplus and Profits, $65,ooo
Episcopal Theological School
CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
The location offers unusual opportunity
or graduate work at Harvard Universi-
ty. For catalogue adress Dean Hodges.
Bade, '15, R. Satterwhite and W. Gro-
ver, are models in pen work as well
as standards of originality. The
height of exhilaration is represented
in the "fast" student who has "pass-
ed," drawn by R. M. Parsons, '14. A
modern application of the hare and
the tortoise fable is cleverly depicted
by C. D. Smith in a double-page illus-
tration.
Are you going to paper, paint or do
any kind of decorating? If so we can
do the work at once. Major & Co.
eod-Sun
RULES COMPLETED FOR "AD"
CONTEST
(Continued from page 1.)
vertisement, though, generally speak-
ing, the advertisement should explain
itself. The candidate 'must also en-
close a signed statement to the effect
that the material submitted is wholly
original with him and that to his
knowledge it has not been published in
any form.
3. The choice of the commodity, bus-
iness institution, etc., to be advertis-
ed is left to the competitor, with the
suggestion that standard products,
well-known firms, etc., about which
information can readily be obtained,
are preferable to little-known or fic-
titious products and concerns.
4. All copy, drawings, etc., submit-
ted must bear an identifying device
or pseudonym and must be accompa-
nied by a sealed envelope containing
such device or pseudonym together
with the name of the competitor.
5. All material must be sent by
mail to the Chairman of the Committee
on Courses in Journalism, Prof. F.. N.
Scott, not later than the Saturday fol-
lowing the spring vacation.
6. The prizes shall be three hun-
dred dollars for the first prize and
two hundred dollars for the second
prize.
7. The judges shall be chosen by
the Committee on Courses in Jour-
nalism.
8. The prizes will be awarded to
the competitors who, in the opinion of
the judges, give most promise of suc-
cess in the advertising field, or show
the greatest insight into advertising
principles and problems. It is not in-

1530-J

HAND PRESSING
Begitning Deo. 80-

SUITS 25c

TROUSERS 19c

PACKARD ACADEMY
Dancing Classes Monday and Friday 7 p. in. Private Lessons by Appoint-
ment. MATINE$ DANCE Saturday, March 7th, 2 to 5 p. In. Hall and
dining room accomodations for private parties. Refrellinents to order.

in &Co., Ltd.,214 S. Main St.
'1

GUY WOOLFOLK

C. I. KIDD,'17 Lit.

1112 S. University Ave.

showing Spring and Summer Ready-to-
lothing from the shop of A. Starr Best,

SHOWROOM-326 S. STATE ST.

I

JUST IN

ESE are the DAYS
that you need a soothing, healing
for Chapped Hands and Face,

Spring Suitings--see
them in our window--
many more inside.-we
will lay aside your se-
lection.
All garments made in
our own shops and by
.our tailors.

tended that the prizes shall be award-
ed for mere cleverness, and no "freak"
or sensational advertising will be se-
riously considered.
9. The right is reserved to with-
hold either or both of the prizes or
to reduce the amounts in case the
judges shall so recommend.
10. The prizes shall be awarded
within one month after the closing of
the competition.
11. All material submitted shall at
the close of the competition become
the property of the University and be
open to public inspection and use.
SOPH ATHLETES ARE HUMBLED
BY 1917 TEAM
(Continued from page 1.)
middle distances, when Ufer won the
quarter mile and Fox captured the
half mile. The sophs made their one
clean sweep in the half mile, and al-
lowed the freshmen but one point in
the quarter.
The climax of excitement came in
the mile run when Richards fought to
avoid being lapped by Carroll the
freshnan miler. Carroll however pass-
ed him before the pistol had been
fired for the last lap, and finished
easily in 4:36 1-5.
The field events only added to the
extent of the freshmen's victory. Wat-
erby cleared 5 feet 9 inches in the
high jump, which is an inch better
than the mark made in last year's
Fresh-Soph struggle, and higher than
any member of the Varsity squad has
been able to jump so far this year.
Cross, another freshman star added
first place in the shot put to the totals
of the yearlings. Cross won first in
the pole vault for the sophs, but the
freshmen garnered the second and
third places in this event.
Directly after the meet, the fresh-
men held a meeting and elected H. L.
Carroll captain of the 1917 squad.
The summaries of the meet follow:
35 yard dash--Smith (S), first;
O'Brien (:F), second; Fonta-r a (F)
third. Time 4 2-5 seconds.
Shot put-Cross (F), first; Edwards
(F) second; Leach (F), th:rd. Distance
39 ft. 8 1-2 inches.
High jump-Waterbury(F),first;Da-
vis (F), and Hammond (S), tied for
second. Height 5 ft. 9 inches.
40 yard high hurdles-Corbin (F),
first; Klopfer (S) second; Thurston
(F), third. Time 5 4-5 seconds.
35 yard low hurdles--Corbin (F),
first; Thurston (F), second; Skinner'
(F), third. Time 5 2-5 seconds.
440 yard dash--Ufer (S), first; Aus-
purger (S), second; Stevens (F), third,
'imine 54 4-5 sconds.
Pole vault-Cross (S), first; Kess-
ler (F), second; Skinner (F), third.
Height 10 feet 9 inches.
Mile run-Carroll (F), first; Grau-
mann (F), second; Richards (S),third,
Time 4:36 1-5.
880 yard run-Fox (S), first; Klop-

ADM ISSION

5c

to tihe Will

Toegp Ie
T heatre
START THE W~EEK RIGHT
Monday, March 2
2 Reel Feature
The Winess

Our stock is most complete along this line

WAIGNE
importing
Tailors

$i Co.
State
Street

OME IN AND LOOK IT OVER
UNIVERSITY AVENUE PHARMACY

- ,6Pianos, Furniture
Trunks, Merchandise
C. E. GODFREY

COULD1NC & WIKEL

fer (S), second; Olson (S) third. Time
2:05 1-5.
Half mile relay-Freshmen (O'Brien,
Herrick, Popkess, Fontana) won.Soph-
omores forfeited. Time 2:05 1-5.
Totals-freshmen first with 53 points.
Sophomores second with 31 points.
MANY CHANCES GIVEN TO HEAR
NOTED PASTOR
(Continued from page 1)
A. meeting.
After a confcernce ith religious
wvorkers at noon MNonday Dr. Fitch will
meet any who wish to interview him
at Newberry hall from 2:30 to 4:00
o'clock, and conduct a general ques-
tionaire in the samne place at S:00
o'clock.
He will be a guest of a fraternity at
luncheon Tuesday, and continue the
informal talks at Newberry hall in
the afternoon and evening. He will
leave Ann Arbor Wednesday on .the
Wolverine for Chicago.
Ex-Congiressman Diekema, will ad-
dress the menbers of the Union at
3:00 o'clock this afternoon. His sub-
ject will be "Railroad Arbitration,"
and his remarks will be based lar^gely
on the experience he has had during
the past two months in Chicago,where
he has been acting as government ar-
bitrator between the Chicago, Bur-
lington and Quincy and its employees.
He served two terms in congress from
the fifth Michigan district, being a Re-
publican in politics,
L. J. Scanlan, '1L, will furnish se-
^ral piano numnbers and h. V. Allman,
graduate, will render a vocal solo.

TELEPHONE US, 416

I

1219 S. University Ave.

Phone 82L

ry parcel wrapped with SATISFACTION
[ tied with a GUARANTEE.
e

410 N. Fourth Ave.

Coming at COLISEUM ROLLER RINK

I

I

ILLIAM E. DIETERLE
FORMERLY THE VARSITY TAILOR OF ANN ARBOR
to announce that he has opened a tailoring establishment in Detroit at
94 WEST FORT STREET

I

I

March 2-3-4. Late feature with Barnum and Bailey Circus, in his
Refinedan Cycle and SkatingAct
Tricks of skill and daring. Unequalled trick and fancy skating.
Also introducing marvelous tricks on Bicycles, Unicycles and
Giraff-a-cycle 10 feet high. An act full of surprises will appeal
to old and young.

With a Complete Line of
BRITISH AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS
ecial attention given to my College trade. Thes
th Better Satisfaction and Better Workmanship.
DIETERLE-VARSITY

same prices
TAILOR

I

I

I

I

Admission 1e

Skates 15c

I
III NaMMM

Fl

GO

Served each afternoon Two

0

till Five p. m. at the

-

a

A;r-110,

Are Sure to Please

M

-11

St

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1

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