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February 22, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

atedly made in regard
)f grading students in
aminations of the liter-
numerous complaints
t the rules are not be-
[hese complaints have
; out the belief that
ten per cent of the
ed in any particular
eceive a grade A.
Registrar A. G. Hall,
has been established
rm, and not as a set
Ihis norm," stated Dr.
"is not intended as a

Collier's Lands Work of F. Adams, '03.
An editorial in a recent number of
Collier's Weekly names Franklin P.
Adams, '03, of the New York Tribune
as one of the two best humor column
writers In the country.
$1,000,000 to be Expended on Buildings
The university will expend nearly
$1,000,000 on building improvements
this year. This sum includes the cost
of the new dormitories, the stadium,
the science hall and various minor im-
provements.

Difficulty in supplying jobs for stu-
dents is being experienced by the sec-
retaries of both Union and Y. M. C. A.
employment bureaus. "Only five men.
have been given jobs since the Christ-a
mas vacation, and there are a hun-
dred men on our waiting list," is theI
statement made by Carl Guthe, sec-
retary of the Union bureau. After-'
noon and Saturday work is particu-
larly in demand. Two of the students
seeking employment stated that if
nothing could be found within a few
weeks they would be obliged to leave
college.

By Dr. Clyde
of the University

Service.

f 7

TUESDAY 24 Matinee E N T I R E
F .E B. Night NEWPROGRAM

ORPHEDM
TUESDAYI FEB, 23 and 24
GREAT WASHINGTON'S
BIRTHDAY PROGRAM
Daniel Frohman
PRESENTS
CECILIA LOFTUS
In the popular novel and fa-
mous play
"A LADY OF
QUALITY"9
by FRANCIS HODGSON BURNETT
A FAMOUS PLAYER IN A FA-
MOUS PLAY
CHAS, F. TUTTLE, Whistler
EXTRA ADDED ATTRACTION
ORPHEUM ORCHESTRA

-'U

or 50a
25o;

ioony 35; Gallery 25c.
Irenunder 12 1 St. Entire House

All seats

10 cents

0

Monday
je ti Tuesday
Wednesday

Special Hol-
iday Matinee
MonJeb,23

The stomach is the organ of diges-
tion, situated below the diaphragm on
the left side below the heart, and cap-
able of holding about 3 pints.
The stomach is more often "insult-
ed" through carelessness and misuse,
probably, than any other organ of the
body. The general factors productive
of gastric disorders are by no means
few. Those relating to the nervous'
system stand at the head of the list.
Meals must be taken amongst pleas-
ant surroundings and with an easy
mind. If the individual eats at a time
when he is worrying or with his eye
on the clock, having an 8 or 1 o'clock
class in view, it is pretty certain that
he has not obtained much benefit from
that meal. On the other hand, attend-
ing an elaborate banquet with too
numerous courses and yet because of
the hour:s at the table being hours of
pleasure and good fellowship, what-
ever harm follows is purely mechan-
ical from overloading the stomach.
The influence of mental process over
digestion is found in th gastric dis-
comforts ensuing upon a fit of anger
during or shortly after meals, or loss
of appetite following upon bad temper
before meal time.
Tobacco, tea, coffee, and alcohol tak-
en into the body are capable of disorder-
ing the stomach. Coffee used in mod-
eration, once daily as a rule, is not to
be prohibited, since the morning cup
oft times promotes regularity of stool,
thereby being beneficial.
Indulgences in pastry, sweet and
highly seasoned foods, the productsof
the frying pan, and foods which are
notoriously difficult of digestion, are
responsible for many cases of stomach
derangement.
Imperfect mastication is probably
the most frequent cause of gastric dis-
order among the American people.
The causes leading to it are "the habit
of being in a hurry" and defective
teeth. The influence or rapid eating
is made still more pernicious by the
free drinking of water at meals to
wash down imperfectly salivated or
masticated food.
The dangers done by rapid eating
are varied. It introduces into the
stomach pieces of food of sizes larger
than that organ should receive or can
expect to manage properly. Necessar-
ily, the lining of the stomach is ex-
posed to "mechanical and even chemi-
cal irritation (if food is retained and
decomposes).
Exercise in the open air is an im-
portant aid to digestion in the healthy.
Hence it is that persons who lead se-
dentary lives are not infrequently dys-
peptics. This does not furnish good
and sufficient reason for ordinary ac-
tive exercise for all victims of gas-
tric disorders.
Violent physical exercise after eat-
ing is almost invariably bad. Patients
who are much under weight are bet-
ter suited to rest than exercise, is like-
wise certain. In the majority of cases,
rest in a horizontal position, for a
time, at least, after eating, is advis-
able.
The average man requires food hav-
ing a heat value of 2720 calories per
day. This should consist of fats, al-
bumin and carbohydrates.
Fats have a nutritive value far
greater than that of any other class
of foods. Fats are difficult of diges-
tion. Some are difficult of digestion.
Some are made so by processes of
cooking, as by frying. Butter is a fat-
ty food which even a delicate stomach
can tolerate. It can be used with
other easily digested foods, as bread.
By judicious training in butter eating,
we can do more than any other way in
maintaining the individuals general
nutrition. Olive oil has obtained great
merits as a food, but it is over done
and disturbs digestion and taxes the

digestive powers when taken in quan-
tities.
Nurses Must Get Permission to Coast.
Nurses at the University hospital
have been forbidden to go coasting,
without obtaining permission from
Miss J. M. Pindell, superintendent of
nurses. The nurses will only be al-
lowed to coast on hills that Miss Pin-
dell believes are safe, because many
injuries to the nurses have resulted-
in past years.
Will Exhibit Illustrations in March.
A collection of illustrations from
the Society of Illustrators will be ex-1
hibited in Memorial Hall during
March. A similar collection was ex-
hibited last year and aroused great
interest. The pictures are the origin-
als of magazine drawings.

A petition has been drawn up ask- Government, and annoi
ing permission of the American So- the various requiremen
ciety of Mechanical Engineers to form forwarded to the biolo
a student branch of that society in partcularrtheuniversitt
Ann Arbor. The petition, together may be learned upon a
with the tentaitve constitution of the the members of biology

THURSDAY FEB.26-27-2'
FRIDAY '
SATURDAY MATINEE DAILY .3:
Marvelous Kleine-Cines Photo Drama
$100,000 PRODUCTION
Q uo Va dis
CAST TEN THOUSAND ACTORS.
IN 3 ACTS-S PARTS.
Performance Lasting 21-4 Hours
MATINEES 3:00 P. M. NIGHTS 3:15 P. M.
As Presented at
Astor Theatre, New York
(306Counseeutive-Perlormances)
McVicker's Theatre, Chicago
(112 Consecutivr Perlernance)
Detroit Opera House
(6 WEEKS);
And at first-class theatres In all the princ ipa
cities of the United States

NIGHTS-Entire Lower Floor .50; 8
ante Balcony .25; All seats R
MATINEES-Entire House, Aduits .2
Note-Every child must

ve a ticke

P0
Whitney
WEDN ESDAY, FBRAY4

new organization, is in Prof. Allen's
office awaiting the signatures of en-
gineering students. All men who have
had 32 hours of engineering work are
eligible to active membership, while
all engineering students can become
associate members. There will also
be graduate and honorary member-
ships.

Police Warn Taxi and Hack Dri
Complaints by students and otl
of the excessively aggressive ta
of Ann Arbor taxi and hack dri
at the depots has forced Chie
Police J. T. Kenny to warn the
fenders to change their policy.
men students especially, have
annoyed by the practice.

Arablan' Whirwinl Dancers
SENSATIONAL NOVELTY

and Scarth, comedians
Comedies, two farces.

Elliott Bros., music of yester-
day, today and tomorrow

-:-

Return Engagement
Of the Greatest Success In Years

ADIA AMPIUSICAL COMEDY
ANEXTRAVAGANZA
With Dixie Harris and Company--10 People

WM. A. BRADY'S

BER!

Extra Matinee Monday, 3 o'clock

Dramnataicv

ssation

NC "Henpecked Henry"
26 MUSICAL COMEDY

30
PEOPLE
30

i

oug
AND

NEYMonday 23 Matinee
F E B mNight

I

did

C. S. PRIMROSE, Presents

Robert Edeson's Splendid Western Drama
Ahere the Trail Divides.

y 1 1
By Geo. Broadhurst

A Big Play Acted in a Big Manner

An impelling story of the Wild West, the love of an Indian for a "pale face" girl.
have placed this play at the head of the notab'e Western Dramas-namely, "The Round
Squaw Man," "The Girl of the Golden West," "The Great Divide," Etc.
Its a play every woman, man and child should see..

The
Up"

st Play of the Generation

A Big Scenic Production

IMPORTANT. The Creat Succes
This Play on its R
Engagement in AnnArbor Return D
Has Resulted in This _____
Four Rows Orchestra........... .
Balance Orchestra......................
Four Rows Balcony.. ...............
Balance Balcony........................

AS SEEN IN ALL THE BIG CITIES

NIGHT
rchestra...........$..1.00
rchestra.......... .75
lcony...........75

Extra! Holiday Matinee

MATINEE
13 Rows Orchestra................. 5
Balance Orchestra................ .50
Bentire Balcony..,................ .25H

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