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February 20, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-02-20

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I

''1

igan

'OOF

PAL J

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1914.

PRICE F

- - I

)RTS

UTIGE
iMPUS

Cent in
r Those
Years

Athletes
of

For Michigan

By Floyd A, Rowe
tor of Intramural Athletics.
the year but half spent, and
1, basketball, hockey, in and
r track, tennis and golf yet to
ver 600 men have participated
in the intramural sports of the
ity. Thirteen teams and 337
mnpeted in the race for the class
. championship last fall. One
I men turned out for freshman
75 for cross country, 35 for as-
.n football, and 50 men played
Christmas vacation basketball
If no more men turn out for
>rts yet to come, than have
out in years past the increase
be nearly twenty-five per cent
iy previous year. It is only
that this increase will be a
one from year to year till the'
s reached where every man in
versity is taking a most active
in some form of exercise.
ost of our American universi-
o saying "Sport for Sport's
s in no way applicable to the
teams, the coaches, or to the
nt of the student body. One
e much nearer the mark were
ay "Win at any cost," as most
ealize only too well that we
od winners" and "poor losers."
usual belief is that it is all
or the "other fellow" to lose.
always borne in mind that the
st thing to winning is to take
gracefully, and to give credit
ory where it is due.
lesire to win, to excel, is pres-
every person, and rightly so.
uis desire to be taken from us
ild soon become the mere proc-
existing from day to day, and
the incentive for our success

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Third informal Saxophone Party,Mich-
igan Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Regular weekly Lounger, Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's reading of
"TFhe Rivals," University Hall, 8:00
o'clock.
Canadian club skating party, Wein-
berg's rink, 8:00 o'clock.
Dr. John W. Scholl of the German de-
paltment will speak to the Girls Ed-
ucation Club on "The Education of
Girls and Women in Germany,"New-
berry hall, 3:00 o'clock.
K. C. Kerwell lectures on "India" un-
der the auspices of the Cosmopoli-
tan club, Newberry hall, 7:30 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Junior women's luncheon, Michigan
Union, 12:00 o'clock.
Afternoon dance under the auspices
of the Day Nursery, Granger's, 3:00
o'lock.
Weekly membership dance, Michigan
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
MANY WOMEN TRY'
FOR ANNUAL PLAY
Nearly one hundred junior women
gave exhibition of their histrionic
ability at the tryouts for the annual
junior play held in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall yesterday afternoon, under
the direction of Prof. H. A. Kenyon,
Earl V. Moore, and Vera Burridge, '15,
general chairman.
The play, which was written by
Louise Markley, will call for approx-
imately severty-five women, none of
whom have been selected. That this
first tryout will not result in enough
good material for the entire cast and
choruses was almost definitely asserted'
by Miss Burridge, and it is probable
that another tryout will be held next
week.
According to custom, the nature andr
name of the play will not be made
known until the time of its presenta-
tion in honor of the senior women, on
April 1.
WOMEN'S DRAMATIC LEAGUE
PLANS SOLID ORGANIZATION

Lundgren Arrives and Gives Varsity
Candidates Sharp Fielding
Drill Yesterday
Afternoon
BA TTING PRACTICE ON THE
CARD FOR TODAY'S SESSION
Captain Pontius Expects Many More
Players to Come Out For
The Team
Coach Carl Lundgren arrived in Ann
Arbor yesterday and took active charge
of the Varsity baseball squad at the
afternoon practice. Thirty candidates
were out to meet the new director of
Michigan's diamond activities, and
wre put through a sharp three hour
fielding practice.
The cage was not used yesterday,
two batters bounding the balls the
length of the gym to the squads of
fielders, who took turns scooping up
the ball and snapping it to the catch-
ers. The battery candidates warmed
up at one side of the gym, with "Tom-
my" Hughitt appearing for a work-
out behind one of the big mitts.
Coach Lundgren annognced that he
would use the cage today, giving the
men their first taste of batting prac-
tice, providing that enough pitchers
showed up. The work from now on will
consist mainly of batting and fielding
practice sessions, probably arranged
on alternate days, with the battery
men working out each day.
No cut in the squad is anticipated
for several weeks, as twice as many
men as are now out can be accommo-
dated, according to the coach. In past
years the indoor squad has consisted
of about sixty men, which is twice
as many as are now out. Captain Pon-
tius expects that about the same num-
ber will report this year, as the bulk
of the men do not usually come out un-
til the third or fourth week.
A list of the candidatets for the nine
will probably be taken at today's
practice, as most of the men are now
certain of their eligibility.
SOPH LITS WILL ACT UPON
ANNUAL PROM CONSTITUTION

NEW COACH IS
IN CHARGE 0
BASEBALL, M

Work Has Been Commenced on Stands,
and Old Wooden Structures
Have Been Torn
Down
WOMEN PETITION FOR RIGHT
TO WEAR VARSITY INSIGNIA
Decision on Summer Baseball Question
Was Again Indefinitely
Postponed
Final authorization was given En-
gineer Weeks to proceed with the con-
struction of the new concrete stands
on Ferry field, by the athletic board of
control, at their meeting last night.
Work has already been commenced
on the stands and the old wooden
ones have been torn to the ground.
The final steps were taken last night
by the board in control to enter into
contract with Weeks to take charge
of the engineering end of the work, un-
der the supervision of the engineering
department of the university.
Many details of construction were
discussed at length, so that the work
may be carried through without hitch.
The size of the tread or space for each
individual seat was fixed at 24 inches,
a slight increase over the first plans,
which will insure comfort to all future
seat holders although cutting down
the capacity of the stands by a small
figure.
A petition was presented by the
Women's league, asking that some
form of the Varsity "M" be granted to
women athletes. This petition was
turned over to the board of directors
of the athletic association as decisions
on such matters fall within their prov-
ince.
The question of the eligibility of
summer baseball players came up for
discussion but was tabled. This ques-
tion will probably not be taken up
again until the last meeting in May.
WILL TRY NEW SYSTEM FOR
BASKETBALL ELIMINATION
Makes It Possible For More Than One
Team in a Department to
Win Numerals

IF

EN

BOARD MAKES
FOR STADIUM

"DOLLIE REFORMING HERSELF"
WILL APPEAR AT THE WHITNEY
"Dollie Reforming Herself" will be
presented by the Repertory play-
ers at the Whitney theater,
the evening of March 3, un-
der the auspices of the Drama
League. This play by Htenry Arthur
Jones has been played recently in a
Chicago theater.
The play thatthe Irish players will
present for the matinee and evening
of March 28, has not been decided
upon as yet. The date for the produc-
tion of "Disraeli" will be announced
later.
All Drama League members who
must get them at Memorial hall, be-
fore Saturday afternoon. Students,
Michigan Union members, and mem-
bers of the faculty can secure seats
from Gordon Eldredge.
Prof. Goddard Gives Talk at Shelby
Prof. E. C. Goddard, of the law de-
partment, gave an address before the
Mid-Winter Rally, held in Shelby,
Mich., yesterday. Professor Goddard
will stop in Grand Rapids on his re-
turn, where he will remain until Sa&-
urday night. V"
FEDERAL JUDGE TO
LECTURE AT UNION
Hon. E. F. Johnson, 'LL.M. '91, a
fedral judge in the Philippine Islands,
will address the members of the Union
at the weekly afternoon program Sun-
day at 3:00 o'clock. His subject will be
"The Philippines," taking up particu-
larly the process by which the govern-
ment has been developed and the part
which Michigan men have played in1
this work.
Inasmuch as Sunday Is Washing-
ton's birthday, the program will take
on a patriotic nature, and Judge John-
son may be considered the university's
Washington's birthday orator. Judge
Johnson is one oC Michgan'* most
prominent aulmni, and is well fittetd to
speak at this special occasion. He has<
a son in the university, Cecil Johnson,1
'12-'14L.t
P. D. Koontz, '14, has been appointed
general chairman, of the Sunday af-t
ternoon committees. He will be as-
sisted during the next two weeks byl
Emmett Connely, '15, Myron Begeman,
'15E, and Harold Easly, '16. This
committee will have charge of arrang-
ing the musical numbers for Sunday'st
program.t
DELINQUENT COUNCILMAN -
WILL NOT LOSE HIS SEAT
Although John Brier, who was elect-
ed to the student council by the grad-,
uate department last November, hast
not attended a single council meeting
he will not lose his seat in that body.
The "four absences" rule cannot be
applied in this case, because the
amendment to the council constitution
making such an election illegal, was
not adopted until the last meeting of
the council, which would have made;
it impossible for Brier to take the oath
of office before that date.
Brier failed to attend the council-E
manic sessions because he had not1
been officially notified of his election,7
but he will present his credentials at
the next meeting, and be sworn in at
that time.
Gym Suffers From Untrained "Whips"i
That indoor baseball practice is anj
expensive luxury was proved yester-
day afternoon when two windows weret
broken in Waterman gymnasium. Some
over-energetic aspirant for honorsI

among the Varsity ball tossers seems
to have lost control of his throwing;
arm to such an extent that it has cost
the authorities $4.00 to replace thet
broken glass:-

Sophomore Campaign Wi
Today; Faculty Canvass
Be Started Sfee
For Michigan Men Ev

ROLL OF
MEMBER

1.

GAINS

T

II

*
*
*
*

Participating Life Mem.
Applicants............
Total..............
Members Needed......
Members to Get.......
Gain Today..........
* * * * * * *

would be taken away.
To just what extent this desire to
excel should be cultivated in athletics
is ,a problem which as yet has not been'
solved, nor is it apt to be solved for
many a day to come. The day is fast
coming, however, if it be not already
here when all will agree that atheltic
exercises, games, and the like are of
great benefit to all, and should be par-
ticipated in by all. The growth of the
Play Ground Movement throughout the
country, the calls of our public schools
for competent physical directors, and
the success and growth of the Young
Men's Christian Association, are all
good proofs that the sentiment is
growing in favor of athletic exercises.
All of the above mentioned systems,
or methods, for physicA betterment
and upbuilding, are being so changed
as to bring in the element of compe-
tition, in some form. The exercises
are being built up into games in which
physical strength and skill are about
equally balanced. For this reason it
was thought best to direct and stimu-
late the athletic activities of the stu-
dents, and to give them attention and
direction. Therefore the department
of Intramural Activities.
As compared with similar work in
schools and universities in the United
States, it is sufficient to say that Mich-
igan is second to none in point of num-
bers actually taking part in the In-
terclass sports. As far as system and
supervision are concerned, Michigan
leads at least among any of the schools
(Continued on page 4.)

By a jump of 30 the life i
ship roll was boosted well up
the 600 mark. Only six of the
cards were handed in last nigl
report from P. D. Koontz, '14
man of the lit committee broi
total up to 30.
The following are the name
ed in to General Chairman Cyr
last night. J. S. Thornton, '14
Dean, '14, D. J. Wanless, '16]
Rosenberry, '04M, J.T. Upjohn,
J. J. O'Leary, '14.
Three men have been picked
charge of the sophomore ca
which starts this morning.
Bruch, '16L, will direct the fr
canvass, J. W. Finkensteadt, '1
look after the soph engineers
B. Thom, '15, will be respons
the soph lits. Committees a
being appointed for the faculty
which will start in a few days.
DR. ANGELL WILL NOT TAE
ACTIVE PART IN EXI
Dr., Angell will be unable
part in the Washingtn birthda
cises, which are to be held Sun
ternbon at 3:00 o'clock in Hi
torium,. under the auspices
Daughters of the American
tion. He and President Hutch
be on the platform, however
program, which has been a
mainly through the efforts of I
of Professor William Wait, is
lows:
Organ solo..........Earl V
Opening prayer.
Star Spangled Banner .......
... . Frederick
Battle Hymn of the Republic ,
...... . Mrs. George Ha
Audience joining in chor
Address.........Hon. Perry
Offertory .........Earl V
Tenting on the Old Camp Grou
.University Q
America. ......... A
Laws Call Off Washington Lt
The Washington Birthday 1L
planned for Monday noon, F
23, for all law classes, has bee:
off, because of the inability to
a speaker. The senior laws wi
ever, hold their annual Was
Birthday dance at the Union,
night at 9:00 o'clock.
J
Lit Team Is Bested in Lively
In a hard fought contest
Weinberg's the engineers out
the lits by a final score of 5 t<
first half ended with the sec
at 2 to 2, but during the secc
the engineers showed some re
and annexed three .counts wl
hits failed to score.
S. S. Grosner to Speak at I
Sylvan S. Grosner will delivc
ceum club lecture on "The Whil
Burden" at Hanover, Mich., to

Plans for a solid organization of the
Women's Dramatic association were
adopted at an open meeting held in
Barbour gymnasium yesterday after-
noon. About eighty women signed up
for membership, pledging their sup-
port to the organization. The execu-
tive power was left in the hands of
"The Masques," but several commit-
tees were appointed from the society
at large, for staging and advertising
purposes. Membership will be left
open until further notice, and women
interested in dramatics may join the
organization at any subsequent meet-
ing until the rolls are closed. Dues
were placed at 50 cents a year.
"The Kleptomaniac," a one act farce,
will be presented by the association,
at its next meeting at 4:00 o'clok
Thursday afternoon, February 26, in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. It was
decided to extend an invitation to all
university and faculty women to come
to this meeting.
Michigamua Will Hold Sleigh Ride
Members of the Michigamua are ar-
ranging to give a sleigh ride and dance
next Monday, February 23. The so- 1
ciety members, with friends, will leave
Ann Arbor about 4:00 o'clock Monday
afternoon and will go to some nearby
town where supper will be served,
after which a dance will be held.

Soph lits will meet at 4:00 o'clock
today in Tappan hall to act upon the
proposed constitution for the soph
prom., and to elect a general chair-
man for the same. The proposed con-
stitution provides for the election of
the chairman from the social commit-
tee of the soph lit class this year, and
to alternate in succeeding years with
the engineers.
The election of D. R. Ballentine as
general chairman, at a meeting held
January 21, has been declared uncon-
stitutinal by A. R. Grierson, president
of the class, and by Prof. A. H. Lloyd,
of the non-athletic committee, because
of a technicality due to.insufficient no-
tice in advance.
Senior Lits Hold '"4" Banquet at Union
Senior its enjoyed the third dinner
of the series, at the Michigan Union
last night, in the form of an "M" ban-
quet. Prof. Arthur Hall, and S. F.
Gingerich, Perry Howard and Roy
Torbet gave talks. Arthur Kohler act-
ed as toastmaster.
Norman Hapgood to Be in Ann Arbor
Mr. Norman Hapgood, editor of Har-
per's Weekly and formerly editor of
Collier's Weekly, will be in Ann Arbor
Monday and Tuesday. Monday night
Mr. Hapgood will speak at a Daily din-
ner, which will. be given at the Union

A new system of elimination will re-
ceive a tryout in this year's basketball
series. In previous years it has been
the custom of the teams in the vari-
ous departments to play for the de-
partment championship, and then have
the finals between these champions.
The system to be used this year
will disregard departments entirely,
and instead will call for an elimination
series between the teams in each class.
The finals will be played among the
two best teams from each class.
This method does away with many
undesirable features, and makes it
possible for more than one team from
each department to win the coveted
numerals. Percentages will be the ba-
sis for elimination.
in his honor. Tuesday morning he
will address Professor F. N. Scott's
class in journalism.
Member of '77L Class Visits Campus
George A. Wood, '77L, prominent coal
operator of Springfield, Ill., paid his
first visit to the campus yesterday,
after an absence of 37 years. The only
buildings he could recognize were a
portion of University hall, and the old
homeopathic building. Mr. Wood is
visiting his son, George P. Wood, '16.

U U

HEAR

GLEE & MANDOLIN CLUB

SEE

COMEDY QUARTET
STRING MELODY TRIO
COMIC OPERA HITS
RAGTIME PARODIES

CO

CERT,

.ROMEO AND JUL
THE BALCONY SC
BASS DRUM PAR
SPANISH BOHEI

HILL AVDITORIVM, NEXT TVESDAY EVE., ALL SEATS 25 ?E

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