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February 17, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

i

IN

EVENTS FOR TODAY
H. V. Wannspeaks on "La Vie A Con-
stantinople," Tappan hall, 5:0
o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

FARRELL AND
KOHLER ISSUE

en and
Part

, I I

ly For Michigan
at during last year
ents were engaged
>us activities. The
was 2,047, but some'
ed several times in
ly. Men holding
s committeeships,
d the members of
head the list with
belonging to clubs
'he athletic teams,
lass, the members
sociation, and the
erested muster 381
n and glee clubs,
he dramatic repre-
190 men. On the
s staffs were 67
classed as miscel-

Tau Beta Pi dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
Soph dent smoker, Michigan Union,
7:30 o'clock.
Choral Union concert by Carl Flesch,
Hungarian violinist, Hill auditori-
um, 8:00 o'clock.
THREE OPERATIONS IN, TWO
MONTHS IS UNIQUE RECORD
Three surgical operations in two
months is the unique record estab-
lished by Leslie Kintz, '17E. Shortly
before vacation a bone growth was re-
moved from his head. Since then his
tonsils have been removed and he has
finished by having his adnoids cut
out. Kintz was able to resume his
studies in the university last week,
and is much improved.
BLAMES MICIGAN
FOR WEAK CREW

CALLFOR MEN
Alarming Dearth of Material For 1914
Track Team Brings Appeal
From Coach and,
Captain
SUCCESS IN COMING SEASON
DEPENDS ON NEW ATHLETES

ONLY SENIORS
WILL WITNESS
CORNELL MEET
Regents Order Limiting of Attendance
For Indoor Track Meets
At Waterman
Gym
SYSTEM OF bRAWING WILL
SELECT 500 TO GET SEATS
Members of 1914 Class Will Get First
Chance in Picking of Number
For March 28
Seniors only will be admitted to the
Cornell indoor track meet this year,
according to action taken by the board

CANDIDATES FOR BASEBALL
APPEAR IN RECORD 7 DITBER
Entire Veteran Battery Is on Hand;
Six; Football Men Try Out
For Places

track and tennis,
varsity and class
branches of ath-
e teams are class-
.nd by classes in

he members
I their class
s find recre-
i at the Ann
he Ypsilanti
g and fenc-

les, the
a mem-
A num-

Michigan's football team is being
blamed for the ruination of the Syr-
acuse championship Varsity crew, by
Coach Ten Eyck, of the Methodist in-
stitution.
Three of the Salt City rowing stars,
Hilfinger, Propst, and Robbins, are un-
fit for work on the Varsity eight this
season, according to the eastern coach.
Hilfinger' and Propst, the one-time
All-American tackles against whom
Michigan directed her attack, will nev-
er row again as the result of their in-
juries received in the Wolverine game.
The former suffered torn shoulder
muscles, and the latter's shoulder was
dislocated three times during the fray,
according to Ten Eyck. Robbins was
also much the worse for wear, as a re-
sult of his activities in attempting to
stop the rushes of Michigan.
CAST OF "THE SCARECROW"
PLANS SECOND PRODUCTION

Practice in Every Event Shows Only
Few Candidates Ready For
Competition
Dearth of material for the 1914 Var-
sity track team is staring Trainer Far-
rell and Captain Kohler in the face.
To remedy this situation a 'meeting
will be held Wednesday evening at
7:30 o'clock in the trophy room of
Waterman gymnasium, for the purpose
of attracting more candidates for the
team of the present season. Farrell,
Kohler and Director Bartelme will
talk.
Both trainer and captain believe
that the material exists in the univer-
sity, but that many of the possible try-
outs need to be stirred into action. The
number of candidates at work now
under Farrell is much smaller than the
number at the same time a year ago,
and there are vacancies to be filled
in nearly every event.
The situation is more favorable in
the dashes than in any of the other
events, but even here the actual num-
ber out for daily practice is only five.
In the quarter mile, there is only one
candidate, and to'" provide him for a
running mate. it would be necessary
to draft one of the candidates from
the half mile.
The distances are better taken care;
of than the sprints, as there are sev-
eral out at each of them. This number
includes only two veterans, however.'
Captain Kohler is the only man,
working with the weights, so that
there is urgent need for more men in
these events, as in the dual meets it is1
desirable to .enter at least two menl
in each event. The other field events
are better taken care of, with the ex-l
ception of the high jump, which has
up to date attracted but two candi-
dates. -
EXERCISES WILL BE HELDc
ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAYt

Although Coach Carl Lundgren fail-
ed to arrive yesterday, a record num-
ber of candidates, both veterans and
recruits, turned out for the daily
workout at the gym.
Sisler, Quaintance and Baribeau,
pitchers, and Baer, catcher, the en-
tire force of veteran battery men, were
on hand. All the infielders were out
also, Howard and Hughitt appearing
for the first time. Sheehy, gardener,
reported, so that the only veteran ab-
sent yesterday was Cory, of the out-
field.
There are now six football men try-
ing for diamond honors. Captain Pon-
tius and Hughitt, of last year's nine,
and James, Lichtner, Benton and Dav-
idson are the pigskin artists tossing
the leather at the gym.
Although no word has been received
from the coach, it is confidently ex-
pected by Captain Pontius that Lund-
gren will arrive early today and take
charge of the squad at the practice)
session this afternoon.
FACULTY APPROVE
DAJES FOR OPERA
It has been definitely decided that

r
j
r
t

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of directors of the athletic association
at a meeting yesterday afternoon.
Owing to the ruling of the board of
regents that attendance at meets in
Waterman gymnasium should be re-
stricted to 500 for reasons of safety,
the athletic authorities were compell-
ed to devise some method of restrict-
ing the attendance.
The president of the athletic associ-
ation is to appoint a committee, con?-
posed of representative men from rep-
resentative campus organizations, who
are to draw 500 seniors. The drawings
will be made from the card indices of
the athletic association.
The numbers of the athletic books
of the successful seniors will be pub-
lished, and the tickets will be reserv-
ed until 3:00 o'clock of the day of the
meet. The tickets left will then be
given to the general student body, as
rapidly as they are called for.
In the succeeding meets the cards
of all seniors not selected among the
500 for the Cornell meet, scheduled for
March 28, together with the cards of
all members of the other classes, will
be drawn from in the same manner.
A committee will select 500 for each
meet, the numbers being published,a
and reservations being made until 3:00
o'clock of the afternoon of the meet.
The board of directors recommendeda
that the pictures of the Varsity foot-I
ball team, the squad of "R" football
men, and the cross country squad, be<
placed in the Michiganensian.,
At a meeting held last week, theI
board placed the matter of issuing the
handbook on athletics in the hands of1
Louis P. Haller, the secretary of the1
old board. Steps are now being taken
to publish the pamphlet.I

Let's Go, Michigan!

the Union opera will be
troit on either March 27

MANY SENIOR
JOIN TO SWE
UNION'S TO
Thirty-Nine Men Added to List
Members-Leaders Now L
to Underelasses
For Aid
For Michigan Men Every

* * * * * * *

given in De-
or 28, at, one

d cities from all over the
have been organized from
me. Clubs devoted to indus-
scholastic subjects interest
lents. Among these are the
club, open to students who
12 hours of work in the
department; the Prescott
posed of pharmacy students;
ational club; the Forestry
Engineering society; Grad-
and the Journal club. The
tan club, comprised of both
nd American students, has
>ers. The Michigan branch
ercollegiate Socialist society,
and Checkers club, and the
tudents club are also among
it organizations.
Alpha Nu, Webster and Jef-
societies are composed of
rested in debating, public-
and other literary work. The
are recruited from students
ary department, and the lat-
om the law department. The
uncil, which consists of rep-
es of the senior and junior
a legislative body for stu-

Members of the cast of "The Scare-
crow" will meet this evening at 7:15'
o'clock to consider the advisability of
giving ano.ther local production of the
show. Many requests have been re-
ceived for a second performance by
those who were unable to witness the
one last week because of the limited
supply of seats.
Next Saturday evening the club will
go to Port Huron where the show will
be repeated. The alumni association
at that place has guaranteed the club
all its expenses, thus obviating any
possibility of a financial failure. Final
plans have not yet definitely matured,
but it is certain that at least 18 per-
sons will make the trip. There is also
more than a bare possibility that a
special orchestra may be taken up to
take care of Prof. A. A. Stanley's spe-
cial incidental music.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB WILL
GIVE LECTURES TO PUBLIC
Public lectures on life and customs
in foreign lands will be given to uni-
versity students every Friday by the
Cosmopolitan club. Members of the
organization will speak on assigned
subjects in the evening at 7:30 o'clock
in Newberry hall. The series will be
opened by T. C. Karwell, '17M, of In-
dia, who will speak on "Glimpse of
India" next Friday.

*

LET'S GO, MICHIGAN!
-0
Participating Life Mem..... 3
Applicants...............1
Total.................. 4
Members Needed .........20
Members to Get.........15
Gain Today.........

of the large theaters and in Chicago
on April 4 at the Auditorium theater,
the largest playhouse in the city. Fac-
ulty permission has been obtained for1
either of the Detroit dates so that no.
delay may be necessary when the
definite date has been set.
The Auditorium in Chicago seats
5,300 people and 1,000 tickets have al-
ready been sold, with close to 3,000
more subscribed for.
A chorus rehearsal was held yester-
day afternoon and three more will be
held this week, on Wednesday night at
6:45 o'clock, Thursday afternoon at
4:00 o'clock and Saturday afternoon
at 1:00 o'clock. The cast will rehearse
tonight at 7:00 o'clock, at which time
Director Bert St. John will be present.
All chorus men have been requested
to watch the opera bulletin, board at
the Union.
HONOR OFFICERS OF SENIOR,
LITS TO BE CHOSEN TODAY
Senior lits will elect a class toast-
master, historian, poet and prophet at
the class meeting which is scheduled
for 4:15 o'clock this afternoon, in the
west physics lecture room. Otheiim-
portant matters will be taken up when
the reports from the three committees
will be heard, the invitations, cane and
souvenir committees having plans and
recommendations ready to submit to
the class for approval.
The cane committee will submit a
report in which it will give its rec-
ommendations regarding' the style of
the stick, based upon the recent vote
of the class.
The souvenir committee has a novel
idea to present in that it will suggest
a campus bulletin board to be erected
near the library, as the class memori-
al.

Returns coming slowly in fron
senior campaign committee sh
slow but regular movement towa:
final goal for Union life mer
Reports from sections of the 11
engineering departments put to
gain at 39, consisting of the fol
named. .
Prof. A. H. Lloyd; C. J. Taylor,
G. C. Paterson, '14E; W. H. Sc
burg, '14E; Davis Dudley, '14:
Mac Ewell, '14E; L. F. Campbell,
A. F. Bassett, '14E; G. L. Wil
'14E; C. S. Morgan, '14E; C. C.
'14; W. J. Meyers, '14; R. H. Ne
'14; G. G. Munn, '14; R. A. Basset
M. R* Wellford, '15; H. M. Easle3
G. G. Wright, '13; F. G. Millard
H. H. Seward, '14; C. L. Roop
W. H. Maier, '13; R. E. Johnston
P. H. Jesserich, '14; B. E. Kline
L. F. Rosenbaum, '14; A. W. K
'14; Robt. White, '14; V. H. White
W. S. Diekema, '14; L. H. Dunten
G'. C. Eldredge, '14; Geo. Caron
J. B. Craig, '14E; F. Vande I
'14E; Chandler Cohagen, '14A;
Crowe, '14E; E. L. Kohler, '14; a
D. Allmendinger,,.'16.
Complete returns from the se
will be registered with general (
man Cyril Quinn tonight. At the
time some idea should be obtai
regarding the way the scheme is
ing with the juniors. Accordin
Homer Heath, the best results w
obtained from the two underch
so the outcome of the 1915 ca:
will be watched closely as tendi
prove the truth or falsity of this s
ment.
Let's Go, Michigan!
HOCKEY SEASON OPENS AT
WEINBERG'S RINK TONI
The inter-departmental hockey
ries will be ushered in tonight at
o'clock, when the lits clash with
laws in the first game of the se
at Weinberg's rink.
The ice is in excellent conditiot
as the men practiced hard all
week, a fast game is expected fe
curtain-raiser.
The engineers have so far 5
the greatest interest, with a pra
roll call of more than 20 candid
The schedule of games will be pul
ed in a' few days.
Will Judge Michiganensian Art I
Art work which has'been subn
for the 1914 Michiganensian, will
ably be passed upon this after
The committee which is to decid
relative merits of the illustration
composed of Prof. H. J. Goulding,
Kimball, R. Everett, Francis A.
'15, and Robert B. Sturtevant, '14
senior record slips will be coil
next Thursday.

The Y. M. C. A., the Glee nd Mando-
lin club, and the. Comedy club are
prominent in campus activities. Stu-
dents of German and French comprise
the Deutscher Verein and the Cercle
Francais, respectively. The honor so-
cieties, such as Phi Beta Kappa, elect
students who excell in scholarship in
(Continued on page 4.)
W.O.Frantz,'79L,Dies of Heart Failure
Word has been received from Wayn-
esboro, Pa., that Willis O. Frantz, '79L,
died suddenly from heart failure, Feb-
ruary 2, aged 56 years. Frantz was
prominent as a lawyer and journalist
at Waynesboro.

Daughters of the American Revolution
Secure lon. Perry Powers
to Speak Sunday
Washington's birthday will be ob-
served Sunday afternoon by appropri-
ate exercises in Hill auditorium, under
the auspices of the Daughters of the
American Revolution.
Similar exercises will be held all
over the country under the auspices of
the same organization, and the offer-
ings taken will be used to endow the
Pohick church, of which George Wash-
ington was once a vestryman.,
The idea of the nation wide services
is that of Mrs. Eliza Rathbone, of Ann
Arbor, the Michigan vice-regent of the
Mount Vernon Association.
Hon. Perry F. Powers, of Cadillac,
former auditor general of- the 'state,
will be the principal speaker at the
local services; having consented to
come at the request of Regent Beal.
The musical program is yet to be ar-
ranged.
Humorist to Appear at K. C. Parlorsi
Miss Gertrude M. O'Reilly, humorist,
will appear under the auspices of the
Knights of Columbus at the K. of C.
parlors, 325 E. Huron street, tonight.

KOHLER IS TO PRESIDE AT
COMING SENIOR LIT DINNER
Captain Arthur Kohler, of the Var-
sity track team, will act as toastmaster
of the senior lit class "M" dinner, at
the Michigan Union, Thursday. Perry
Howard and Roy H. Torbet will re-
spond to toasts, and Professors Arthur
G. Hall and S. F. Gingerich will rep-
'resent the faculty. The "goldtooth"
quartette will furnish the musical end
of the program.
Dr. Meyers Speaks at Detroit Hospital
Dr. Dean W. Myers of the Homeo-
pathic hospital staff, delivered a paper
on "Infectious Sore Throats," before
the Detroit practitioners society at the
Grace hospital in that city last night.
Dr. C. B. Burrett and R. R. Mellon, of
the Homeopathic medical college, were
present.
Varsity Band Will Play Dance Music
Michigan's Varsity band, playing in
two alternating sections, will furnish
music for a dance to be given Thurs-
day evening in Barbour gymnasium.
Tickets are now on sale at Wahr's, the
Union and the South University phar-
macy at 75 cents each.

Apply Special Apparatus in Air Tests
Special apparatus was used last
night in an extensive test by students
in mechanical engineering to deter-
mine the frictional resistance of air
through piping. Over 100 feet of gal-
vanized pipe was connected in the
basement of the engineering building,
and the air passed through it.

HILL AUDITORIUM

GLEE & MANDOLIN CLUB,

NEXT TUESDAY El

25c

COMIC OPERA

CONCERT

25c

SEATS NOW ON SALE

WAHR'S, SHEEHAN'S, UNION

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