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October 08, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-08

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A

1

ich igan

Daily

I

IF THERE'S A PIPE

64

8.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

NT OF

THE WORLD)'SSERIES.
---

UNION BEGINS

MEN WANTED
FOR POSITIONS

CIL GIVES
P POSITION
ert Tenders Resignation
r Meeting Last Night;
F, McCoy to Fill
Vacancy.
N IS ADOPTED TO
LE -PROBLEM OF BAND.
For Campus Activities
st Offer "Party
Platforms."

1
Phil. 0
N. Y. 0

2
0
0

3
0
1

4
3
0

5
2
'3

6
0
0

7 8
0 1
0 0
R H

9
0
0
E

' Ph ila. ... ...........6 10 1*
. N..............4 11 0 *
* Batteries- *
* Marquard, Crandall, Tesreau *
* and Meyers. *
* Bender and Schang. *
M. A. C. COSMOPOLITANS WILL
VISIT LOCAL ORGANIZATION

DIG0 CAMPAIGN
THIS EVENING
Combined Committees Met Last Night
And Outlined Giant Canvass
Which Will Reach
All Students.

mlaniy

ON BOAT CLUBI

'I'
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Offices to Be Awarded
Posessing Ability and
Experience in
This Line.

Those

Fads Concerning Infirmary.
-0-
1. Temporary offices for men-
723 Church street, Dr. H. H.
Cummings, telephone 1349-L,
at home throughout the day.
Dr. C. B. Stouffer, old homeo-
pathic building, telephone
through university exchange,
office hours 9:00 to 12:00 and
2:30 to 4:00. Other hours at
821 E. Huron, telephone 1896.
2. Temporary offices for women
-Dr. L. C. Pratt, telephone
233-, rhours by appointment
in Barbour gymnasium.
3. All treatment, examination
and medicine free. Specialist
consultation or hospital treat-
ment if necessary. All out-
side day calls, $1.00 and night
calls $2.00. . , , * ,

1917 MEN GIVE
HARD BATT

RESULTS TO BE TABULATED
AT UNION WHEN REPORTED

The first monthly smoker of the Aim to1

Besides adopting the modified
"Bruce-Ilulbert" plan of election of
campus officers, the student council at
its regular meeting last night received
the resignation of Harold S. Hulbert,
'14M, as president. Press of scholastic
work was given as the cause of the ac-
tion. Until the election of Hulbert's
successor T. F. McCoy, secretary, will
fill the vacancy.
The band problem was discussed,
and after an investigation of the plan
advanced by the council committee,
its resolution was unanimously adopt-
ed. According to the plan which was
accepted and which will be presented
to the athletic board at its meeting
Saturday, a band of at least 30 mem-
bers is to be organized and directed
by a school of music instructor, and
the remuneration is to be either in the
form of a trip to Cornell or a monetary
consideration of $15.00. The mem-
bers of the council were united on
their stand of a closer control of such
an organization by campus powers,
and also on their attitude that the men
should receive reward of some kind.
After a thorough discussion of the
proposed plan for purifying elections
and enlightening the voter on records
of candidates and the issues at stake,
the council decided to give the method
a trial in general elections by adopting
the following resolution:
Resolved:-That all candidates for
campus activities be required to pre-
sent their stand on current campus
questions and give their campus rec-
ords. This is to be published and su-
pervised by an election committee
from the student council.
Discussion centered around the
question of including class officers in
the plan, and it was finally decided
that the early election dates make a
fair trial of the plan impossible in the.
short time remaining so only the gen-
eral officers of campus elections were
included in the resolution.
In accordance with the interclass
constitution which provides that all
but freshmen class nominations should
take place on the Saturday of the sec-
ond week of the first semester, and
elections to be held the following Sat-,
urday, and freshman nominations and
elections to be held a week later, the
council fixed Saturday, October 11 as
the nomination day for all upper class-
es, and Saturday, October 18 as elec-
tion day Freshmen classes will nom-
inate officers October 18 and will hold
elections a week from that date. l
The confusion arising out of the non-t
(Continued on page 4.)f

Corda-Fratres Cosmopolitan club will
be held Friday evening, October 17, at
7:30 o'clock at the Michigan Union.
The M. A. C. chapter of the association
has been invited to attend, and it is
expected that the whole body of Cos-
mopolitans in Lansing will be present,
as M. A. C. will play Michigan on Fer-
ry field the next day.
The board of directors of the club
has decided to conduct an extended
publicity campaign throughout the
state especially in connection with the
six members of the club who are to
give extension lectures.
The following committee chairmen
have been appointed: membership,
William S. James, 15D; entertain-
ment, C. P. Wang, '14; financial, W. C.
Allard, '14, and publicity, Fred B.
Foulk, '13-'15L.
ADOPT NEW' PLAN
FOR CLASS GAMES

Gain 500 New Members Making
a Final Roll of About
3,000.

The percentage system will be used
in determining the football champion-
ship of each department in place of
the elimination process that has been
in vogue in previous years. This was
the decision reached yesterday after-
noon at a meeting of the class football
managers. Ten teams were represent-
ed at the meeting and all were in fa-
vor of the new method which was the
suggestion of Floyd Rowe, director of
intramural athletics.
The contests start October 20. Each
team will play every other team of
their department and the class win-
ning the largest percentage of games
will be champions of that department.
The winners of the departments will
play to decide the championship of the
campus.
Teams standing second in the differ-
ent departments will also compete for
second honors. By using this method
teams will have longer schedules and
no championship will be won by pure
luck as has often been the case in the
past, when a winning team has been
defeated in its opening strtuggle by
luck breaking against it.
Fourteen teams have already enter-
ed in the class league and Director
Rowe said last night that he had hopes
of two other classes placing teams in
the running. Those already entered
are as follows: four literary classes,
four engineering classes, three law
classes, the sophomore medics, a gen-
eral combined department freshman
team composed of all first year class-
es not in the above three departments,
and a general department team picked
from all the department classes not
entering the class teams.
HUMOR BOOK MAKES FORMAL
BOW TO CAMPUS OCTOBER 18
The "Gargoyle" will make -its first.
appearance of the year October 18.
The staff has been greatly strengthen-
ed by the addition of several new ar-
tists and humorists and Lester Rosen-
baum, '14, the editor is especially op-
timistic. The book will be of especial
interest to first year men being
"Freshman Number."

With the membership of the Union
already within 200 of last year's figure
of 2,437 the canvassing committee will
take up its work tonight in an endeav-
or to gain 500 new members. Chair-
man H. Beach Carpenter set this figure
as the goal to be reached, in his ad-
dress before the assembled commit-
teemen at the Union last night. Morris
Toulme, '14L, who was in charge of a
similar campaign last year which net-
ted nearly 300 additional members also
spoke and urged the men to strive for
a record membership this year.
Every house in the city where stu-
dents room will be visited by the mem-
bers of the committee in their canvass
tonight or tomorrow night, thus so far
as possible bringing the work of the
Union before every man in the univer-
sity. The results will be posted at the
Union as soon as they are reported by
telephone. The city is divided into nine
districts in charge of the following
sub-chairmen and committeemen:
Lester Rosenbaum, sub-chairman,
John Switzer, Francis Bade, Lyle Clift,
Fred Van Dolsen, Chas. W. Wattles,
H. C. Rummel, Daniel McLaughlin,
Chester H. Lang, Leonard Rieser.
Howard Seward, sub-chairman,Hud-
son White, Joseph Fee, Wm. Brother-
ton, George Murphy, Russell Collins,
James Bond, Wilbur Davidson, John
:Watkins, Theodore Stone, Herbert
Donnelly. A
Edward Haislip, sub-chairman, John
Leonard, Don Morrill, W. N. Schaffer,
E. D. Crumpacker, Harry Boardman,
J. B. Helm, E. S. Wells, L. M. Brush,
J. F. Jordan, F. R. Town.
John Lippincott, sub-chairman, L.K.
Wood, Marion Wellford, Ralph Snyder,
Claude Seehorn, Herman Trum, Bertel
Larson, Harold Lafever, Russell Jud-
son, Clement Marshall, Harold Perry.
Paul Thompson, sub-chairman, Hor-
ace Caulkins, John Tinkenstaedt,How-
ard Oer, Herbert Barthoff, James Bar-
rett, George Johnston, Paul Wagner, J.
(Continued from page 1.)
NEW ORGANIZATIONS MUST
MAKE PETITIONS BY FRIDAY
All new organizations, including the
women's student council, which desire
recognition must give their petitions
to Professor Lloyd before Friday at
4:00 o'clock. The senate committee
on non-athletic organizations meets at
this time to consider all petitions of
new fraternities or campus societies.
Prescott Club Will Smoke at Union.
Prescott club, an organization of thej
pharmic department, will hold its first
smoker of the year at the Union
Thursday evening at 7:00 o'clodk. The
smoker will be followed by a business
meeting at which important measures.
will be brought up for consideration.

ENSIGNS TO HAVE CARE OF
CLUB HOUSE AND REGATTAS
Aspirants Should File Applications
by Mail to the Michigan
Union at Once.
Several positions as officers and
committeemen on the Michigan Union
Boat club are open, and at a meeting
to be held at the Union Sunday morn-
ing at 11:00 o'clock appointments will
be made from the applications which
are to be filed with the commodore.
The offices to be filled are vice-com-
modore, secretary and treasurer. Po-
sitions are also open for about 40
committeemen. The commodore's
committee is executive in nature and
only those should apply who have
some organizing ability. and experi-
ence. There 'is room for three or four
men on this committee. There are
also openings on the committee of the
vice-commodore and the secretary, the
latter organization being chiefly for
purposes of organization.
In case that the present ensigns are
moved up to the higher offices there
will be three ensign positions to be
filled. The first ensign will have
charge of the club house which the
boat club is planning to erect. The
second ensign has charge of the social
work, including regattas and dances.
A big regatta or carnival planned for
May will be under his direction. The
third ensign manages the membership.
Men who are interested in any branch
of te organization are asked to ap-
ply at once in wrting. The letters
stating the experience, interest and
ability, should be sent to the Michigan
Union in care of the commodore. Ap-
pointments will be made according to
these qualifications.
WORK FOR MICHIGANENSIAN
ARTISTS WILL BE OUTLINED
Definite plans for the work of artists
contributing to the Michiganensian
this year will be outlined by R. B.
Sturtevant, manageing editor, at a
meeting next week. Indications show
promise of a most successful year
book for 1914. Fraternity contracts
will probably be mailed Friday or Sat-
urday.
SECOND ROUND OF TENNIS
TOURNEY PLAYED YESTERDAY
The second round of the "All-Com-
ers" Championship Tennis Tourna-
ment was pulled off yesterday under
ideal weather and court conditions.
All the matches, as a rule were won
afternoon in the semi-finals.
Results of yesterday's matches are
as follows: Oliver defeated Codd 6-3,
10-8, in a hard fought match; Wright
fell before the service of Crawford
6-0, 6-2; Barringer disposed of An-
drews, last year's Varsity captain,
6-4, 6-0. Cook lost to Captain Wil-
son 6-0, 6-2; Switzer defeated Mont-
gomery 6-2, 7-5; Bond won from
Cook 6-0, 6-4. Thorsch dropped
two sets to Wheeler 6-0, 6-0.

COMEDY CLUB CONTESTANTS
GIVEN EXTENSION OF TIME.
Owing to the fact that several cam-
pus playwrights were unable to finish
their productions last Friday evening,
the time-limit for the Comedy club
prize competition has been extended
until October 17.
Three mansucripts are already in
the hands of the committee, and sever-
al more are expected before the end
of this week.
Tryouts for the annual production
of the Comedy club will be held Fri-
day afternoon at 3:00 o'clock in the
Cercle Francais rooms.
TO RUN RELAYS
AT ORANGE GAME
The annual fall class relay races
will be run between the halves of the
Michigan-Syracuse game on November
1, according to an announcement made
Tuesday by Floyd Rowe, director of
intramural activities, the official in
charge of the events.
A half dozen men are already prac-
ticing on the Ferry field track in prep-
aration for the tryouts which will be
held to select the class representa.
tives. In this squad are three fresh-
men and one each of the three upper
classes. Other prospective runners
have announced their intentions of
coming out for the trials as soon as it
is possible to secure lockers in the
new field house now nearing comple-
tion.
DIRECTOR ROWE TO OFFER
NEW COURSE IN COACHING.
It is now certain that Intramural Di-
rector Rowe will offer to senior liter-
ary students, enrolled in the educa-
tion department, a course in football
coaching. Students not in this class,
who intend to secure coaching posi-
tions after leaving school, may also
be admitted to the course by special
permission. The time of meeting of
the class will not be known until
Director Rowe has consulted with
those intending to take the course.
The men who take up the work will
be assigned practical work with differ-
ent class teams and will have an op-
portunity of working under the super-
vision of Director Rowe.
French Aviator to Give Lectures.
Professor L. Marchi, head' of the
aviation laboratory of the University
of Paris, will give a series of illustrat-
ed lectures on aviation this week in
west physics lecture room. The lec-
tures will be given in French, and all
who are interested are invited. The
talks will be given Wednesday, Thurs-
day and Friday afternoons at 4:15
o'clock and Friday night at 8:00
o'clock.
CLUB HOUSE TO BE OPENED
FOR CLASS TEAMS FRIDAY.
The club house on Ferry field which
has been erected for the exclusive use
of class teams will be opened Friday.
The new structure will be able to
accommodate 250 men. There will be
125 lockers large enough for two men
to use together. Any class football
man may receive a locker by reporting
to DirectorRowe at the club house to-
morrow or in the near future.

Varsity Eleven Wins Close-Fough
Touchdown From Douglas'
Djsciples;Many Scrubs
in First Team.
FRESHMAN SQUAD COMPOSED
ENTIRELY OF REGULAR MEN
First-Year Men Quick to Recover
With Goal in Danger; Douglas
Praises Pupils.
Coach Douglas brought his squad of
All-Fresh candidates over to the main
gridiron to battle the Varsity yester-
day afternoon, with the result that a
somewhat misfit eleven of Varsity
aspirants was obliged to put in a hard
half hour's work.to score one touch-
down against the youngsters.
Coach Yost did not line up his usual
first team -for signal drill prior to the
All-Fresh engagement. His team of
regulars was composed of about half
first string candidates, and hal. of the
second list. The other men worked
on the second squad. When the coach
sent the Varsity against the freshmen,
his team presented still a different
lineup.
Coach Douglas brought his entire
string of players to battle the Yost
eleven, and started his best combina-
tion. It may be said In passing that
his best combination was a good one.
Critics generally agreed that the
freshmen showed surprisingly well,
while the football followers gathered
to watch the scrimmage showed plain-
ly that their sympathies were with the
verdant players.
The Varsity received the freshmen's
kick at the beginning of play, and for
a time it appeared that the big team
would march straight over the All-
Fresh goal line. The youngsters
braced, however, and twice recovered
the ball in the shadow of their own
goal posts and punted out of danger.
On one occasion the freshmen held
the Varsity for downs and once they
recovered the ball on a Varsity fum-
ble.
Getting possession of the ball near
mid-field, the freshmen showed that
their offense was not to be 'dealt with
lightly. They marched the ball straight
up the field on long gains by Maul-
betsch, McNamara, Splawn and Ziger,
only to lose it on a fumble when they
had a fine chance to score. Later the
same trick was repeated, with a 45
yard run by Ziger and long plunges
by Maulbetsch featuring the attack.
This time the freshmen attempted to
drop kick on the third down, with
Maulbetsch doing the booting, and
failed in the attempt. Had the young-
sters kept up their plunging game
they might have had a second oppor-
(Continued on page 4.)
Hospital Ward Soon to Be Completed
The new contagious ward of the
university hospital, which will be lo-
cated east of the psychopathic will
contain 12 rooms for the accommoda-
tion of 24 patients. . The building Is
progressing rapidly.
RHODES EXAMS
HELD HERE. SOON
President H. B. Hutchins, as chair-
man of the committee of selection of
candidates for the Rhodes Scholar-
ships, has announced that the quali-
fying examinations will be held here
October 14 and 15. Those who ex-
pect to compete are to report at the
office of the president October 14 dur-
ing the morning. Candidates must
have been citizens of the United States

for at least five years, must be be-
tween 19 and 25 years old, and must
have completed their sophomore year
in a degree-granting university or col-
lege. Each must send a full statement
of 'his educational career and athletic
record. There will probably be five or
six Michigan men try the examina-
tions.

MANY ENGINEERS
STUDYING AUTO
Already 3.5 students have elected the
general course in automobile engi-
neering and 14 are taking the labora-
tory work. Manufacturers are in-
terested in the new department and
have generously donated machines, en-
gines and the different parts for ex-
pieriment and testing.
There are now two complete chassis,
four magnetos and much other appa-
ratus. Laboratory work started yes-
terday afternoon.
At 8:00 o'clock every Friday morn-
ing, in room 348, an illustrated lecture
will be given on the modern automo-
bile. Professor Fishleigh will deliver
most of the lectures but already three
men, prominent in the automobile'
world have promised to talk to the
class. The lectures will be open to
the student body.

Student Stumbles on Etiquette;
Tri Full of Pleasing Perplexities.
He had supped freely and left the he fell. Again he investigated. The
banquet hall in the smallest hours of board read, "Please."
the breaking dawn. He followed the He piled on full sail and with a
car tracks to the campus and, for-

PHYSICiAN REPORTS PRES.
ANGELL TO BE IMPROVING.
President-emeritus Angell was able
to walk about the lower floor of his
home yesterday. That this steady im-
provement will place Dr. Angell on the
campus within the month, is the opin-
ion of .the attending physician.

saking the aid of the gleaming rails,
braved alone the labarynth of the
paths which bi-tri-, and multi-sect the
campus. For seven feet he fared well
and then he fell to mother earth. Em-
ulating Ike Newton, he investigated
the fall of man. It was a .board. The
board bore the word, "Please."
He realized that he was on the
wrong track and changing his course
to north by north east, steered for the
ghosty form of Memorial hall. Again

frenzy born of hallucination, sped at
full speed for the library. Within a
rod of his haven, he catapulted over
an unseen obstruction, turned a double
sommersault, skidded from an oak
tree to the cement pavement and slid
to the flagpole with brakes set.
He was found in the topmost branch-
es of Tappan Oak trying to scratch
his seventh vertebrae with his left el-
bow and with every failure he sighed
plaintively, "Please."

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