100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.n

I

y

T

.~....

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATfM-AY, JANUARY 24, 1914.

PRICE FIVE

r

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Weekly membership dance, Michiganr
Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Sarah Caswell Angell chapter of the
D. A. R. will give a free entertain
mient to children, Majestic theater
in afternoon.

League and Druids
ost Seat Sale
11 Former

EVENTS (OF

TO GO ON SALE AT
'S, MONDAY, FEBRUARY

9

ge From 50 Cents to $1.00
sive of Gallery, Which
ill Be Unreserved.
demand for tickets to the
b's production, "The Scare-
redicted as a result of the
it of the play by the Drama
America, and the decision
d society to attend enmasse.
first time in the history of
iation that a widespread,
erest will be evidenced in
tickets, while the block of
put aside for the Druids
o the possibility of similar
I taken on the part of other

Sunday afternoon entertainment at the
Michigan Union, 2:30 -o'clock.
Dr. Shailer Mathews speaks at Majes-
tic theater, 6:30 o'clock.
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins speaks undei
the auspices of the Union Guild se-
ries, Episcopal church. 7:45 o'clock
DURING EXAM WEEKS
Jan. 26-Twilight organ recital b .
Earl V. Moore, Hill auditorium, 5:0(
o'clock.
Jan. 26-Dr. Arthur I. Day lectures or
"The Volcano Killuea in Action,"am-
phitheater of chemical building, 4:0(
o'clock.
Jan. 27-2nd twilight recital in Hi
auditorium, 5:00 o'clock.
Jan. 27-Prof. H. R. Cross lectures ii
High School auditorium, 8:Pt
o'clock.
Jan. 29-3rd twilight recital in fill
auditorium, 5:00 o'clock.
Jan. 30-4th twilight recital in Hil
auditorium, 5:00 C'clock.
Jan. 31-Weekly membership dance a
the Michigan Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Feb. 1-Prof. Ernst von Dobschult:
lectures on "The Bible Indispensible
to the Church," Presbyterian church
7:45 c'clock.
Feb. 1-Prof. Dr. Ernst von Dodschult
lectures on "Christianity and Hel-
lenism" in Alumni memorial hall.
- 4:30 o'clock.
Feb. 3-Prof. Eminl Lorch lectures in
High School auditorium, 8:00

A DOG'S LIFE!
LU
SPE AI
P-/
- i

DR. LIATHEWS WILL SPEAK AT
MAJESTIC ON SUNDAY NIGHT.
Y. M. C. A. Sunday Evening Talks to
Ite Extended Throughout Next
Semester.
Dr. Shailer Mathews, of Chicago
University, will speak at the Y. M..C.
A. meeting in the Majestic theater Sun-
day evenin. lie appeared in Ann
Arbor earlier in the year, nder the
auspices of the Wesleyan Guild.
Because of the growing attendance
at these services, members of the Y.M.
C. A. cabinet pledged themselves to
raise $325, to continue them next sem-
ester. The fund will be sufficient to
defray expenses until April 26, when
E. C. Mercer is to return for a week.
The play house will be dark on Sun-
day evenings, during the examination
period, but will reopen February 15.
WIZARD FIXES

DEATH CLAIMS
NEIL W.SNOi
VARSI.TY ST
---
End Comes Suddenly of Heart
After Playing at Racquet (
in Detroit; Doctor's Efforl
in Vain.
11AS OFFICIATED AT SEVER
YALE-HARVARD BA'
'M" Club Arranges to Send
Floral "M" in Token of
Achievements.
Neil W. Snow of Detroit, of
star Wolverine football, baseb
track athlete, winner of more
than any other Michigan mar
one of the foremost football (

SISLER'S .ARM

le of the tickets
February 9 at
ders will not be
heater until lat-
Wahr's the ex-
first days' sales.
for the lower
I $1.00; for the
nts. There will
allery seats, but
be thrown open
on the day of

FOR NEW_ MILL.
"Boneseftei" Reese, of Y.Vungstown.
Ohio, Has Kept Michigan's
Premier Twirler Off
Bench.
REPORT THAT PIRATES MIGHT
PROCURE STAR IS INFOUNDED
Ilg League Offers Do Not Tempt Sis
From Engineering
Work,
As a result D i'carefully following the

in
aw
at
iO~
Snc
clu
'i.
oft
to
den
fai
Un
190
un
for
jor
bal

the country, is dead. He
ay suddenly on Thursday af:
the office of Dr. C. G. Jennin
wlng an attack of heart fails
Death was entirely unexpect
ow had been playing at the I
b when he complained of
A friend accompanied him
ice of the doctor, where he al
recover under treatment. Th
only he fell to the floor and all
led to revive him.
Neil Snow was a student
iversity of Michigan in 1891
00 and 1901. In each of thos(
der the eligibility rules tb
ce, he participated in the thi
sports, football, track an(
[1. He won his football le
aying at right end every ye
s picked by Coach Fielding 1
the latter's "All-Time All
n" eleven. In baseball he pl
tfeld position and again wc
nor letters. In track he par
three years. Injuries kept 1
the broad jump, his chief
ring one year. He was tht

(OTEST ORATIONS
MUST BE IN SOON'

Formal Union
an Union, 9:00

party at
o'clock.

the I

Manuscripts of orations for the
Northern oratorical league contest,.
which will be held at the University of

de-

at the office of
n Thursday or
d 30, in order
ie extra fee of
delinquent in

de-

FRATERNITY DIISPUTE STILL
REMAINS AT A STANDSTILL
Both Factions Consider Compromise
Oly Hope for Constructive
Legislaton.
The deadlock arising from the last
meeting of the inter-Fraternity Con-
ference seems as far from settlement
as ever. Both sides have sought to jus-
tify their stand of Tuesday night be-
fore the faculty, but as yet neither
sfde has consented that the faculty
Should take over the matter for arbi-
ration.
Compromise is considered the only
hope if any constructive legislation is
;o be accomplished, and unofficial in-
formation seems to show that both
factions are working toward that end.
In the near future an informal meet-
'ng will probably be held at which
time proposals and concessions can
be made, which will not be destroyed
by hot-headed accusations and count-
3r-accusations. Neither party wishes
,o be forced to take the matter to the
'aculty for settlement, and this will
probably be the fact which will bring
.he matter to an amicable agreement.
Employment Bureau In Need of Work
"The pressing need of our employ-
anent bureau is for work during the
examination period" declared Frank T.

Wisconsin on May 1, must be turnied in
to the Oratory department on Febru-
ary 13, the first Friday after examina-
tions. Class contests are scheduled
for February 20, and the University
final will be held under the auspices
of the Oratorical association in Uni-
versity hall, on March 20.
To capture the University oratorical
contest and represent Michigan in the
inter-university meet, ranks the win-
ner as First Honor orator, and is the
highest single honor in oratory attain-
able in the university. This was held
by Paul B. Blanshard, '14, last year.
The Chicago Alumni medal, and a
cash prize of $100 will be given for
first honors in the University contest,
and $50 is offered for second place.
These two prizes are donated by Na-
than N. Kaufman, of Marquette, Mich.
In the Northern oratorical league
contest, in which seven universities,
Michigan, Northwestern, Wisconsin,
Oberlin, Iowa State, Minesota, and
Illinois will compete, two other prizes
of $100 and $50 are offered for firstl
and second honors respectively.

MANY HEAR LONG
SCHORALPROGRAM
An unusually long and varied pro-
grain featured the concert which was
given last night in Hill auditorium by
the Choral Union, under the leadership
of Prof. Albert A. Stanley, and assist-
ed by Miss Lucille Stevenson, sopr'ano,
Mr. Marion Green, basso-cantate, and
Earl V Moore, organist. During the
first part of the evening the music was
of a. religious character; later it be-
came general, covering a wide range
of selection,
The work of the chorus was uni-
formly good. In finish, intonation, and
in precision of attack it left little to
be desired. Except for an occasional
lapse, the singers were responsive to
every shade of Prof. Stanley's admir-
able conducting.
Miss Stevenson characterized her
numbers by purity of tone and excel-
lent enunciation, and made the "Pian-
gero. la sorte mia" stand out as a mod-
el of artistic restraint. After an un-
fortunate start, for which a dreary
Bach aria was responsible, Mr. Green
created a very favorable impression
upon the audience, his well trained
voice showing to excellent advantage
in a group of songs. Earl Moore's or-
gan solo, as well as his accompani-
ments, was played with insight and
feeling.x

directions given him by "Bonesetter' pla
Reese of Youngstown, Ohio, when h( wa
visited the famous-major league base- for
ball specialist last summer, George gal
Sisler, star pitcher of the 1913 Wol- out
verine baseball team, and the main- hor
stay of the ball tossers in the batting 'd
department, will be in tip-top condi- 3f
tion for the opening of play this sea- du
son. fro
Furthermore, Sisler has not signed 4av
to play this summer with the Pitts- ber
burg Pirates, despite seeminfgly well- it i
founded reports to this effect. The tha
athlete himseFf is authority for this S
news. bee
Sisler suffered a severe strain of his the
pitching arm last spring during a cer
work-out in Waterman gymnasium. He T
felt the ill-effects of the hurt through-. he
out the latter part of the season, and Ou
this summer journeyed down to the has
famous surgeon who doctors crippled foo
baseball players. The expert pro- 3ev
nounced the injury a real one but pre- Ha
scribed a course of healing which has
proved effective. old
Last year Sisler was not only the ;on
star of the pitching staff, winning r,
more than one game from that posi- B.
tion, but was also the most effective ger
and consistent hitter on the squad.
Had he been unable to play during the Mi
coming season, his loss, together with ret
that of Charles Webber, catcher, whc He
leaves school at the end of the pres- the
ent semester, would have materially me
weakened the team.

in

s been one of the me
otball officials in the
veral times officiated at
arvard battles.
Neil Snow was thir
[. He is survived by tl
n, Neil Jr., 8 months c
Mrs. Frank Snow; a
Snow, and a sister, M,
r.
The "M" club of the
chigan has arranged,
tary Floyd A. Rowe
Bath, to send a large
e fueral as a token o
nts.

r o
s 1

be com-
blanks.
ed yes-

seme-
ly an-
letins,
bulle-

the coming
y be given
ary 11, at
mailed out.
s of the de-
tted to give

,I

rs in the election
rning. W. I. Lillie
junior medics at a
I yesterday morn-

Olmstead of the Y. M. C. A. yesterday.
"We must have jobs for those who
have spare time, outside the class-
room. House work, clerical positions,
and inside work is in special demand.
There are 24 applicants for table and
kcitchen places, and a dozen more who
want to earn their room rent."

BASKET BALL TONIGHT, 8:15
TUS TINS of Detroit
VS.
ANN ARBOR "Y"
At City "Y"
Come and see t"Bubbles", Staatz and Brush

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE MUST
UNDERGO COMPLETE REVISION
Owing to the fact that the Fresh
medics have entered a team in the
basketball series this winter, a change
in the practice schedule published in
The Daily has been necessitated.
Post cards are being mailed to the
managers of the different teams by
Director Rowe announcing the revision
of the schedule and assigning new
practice periods. The revised sched-
ule and also the schedule of games will
probably be made public after exami
nations.

Washington Sclentist
Dr. Arthur L. Day, di
geographical laboratory
ton, D. C., will give an
Monday afternoon at 4:
the amphitheater of t
building. His subject w
Observations of the Vol
in Action." The public

Soph Lits Wil
Soph tits will
dinner-dance at
11. A special
appointed to tak
consisting of R
John, and F. H.

r

V. OF M. COMEDY CLVB Preeents

(16
T

E

SC ARECROW"
By PERCY MACKIAYE

Feb.

v Whitney Theatre, Thursday Evening Feb.12

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan