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January 22, 1914 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-22

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1914.

I

PRIC

IV, No. 84.

..

__

IIGAN HAS
RIVALS IN

IY FIELD

Reig; S ipreminc in Realm
ibating; Records Show
Long Series of
Victories.
igan Daily For Michigan

Michigan's superiority in or-
atory is nationally known. Her
records in debatin and oratory
are unapproached by any other
instruction have been followed by most
of the western universities. It was
through the efforts and influence of the
Michigan department of oratory that
the Northern Oratorical League was
organized in 189,, and the Central De-
bating League seven years later, and
thus, through her influence, the entire
style of western collegiate oratory was
changed.
Out od' the 44 intercollegiate debates
that she has participated in, Michigan
has carried off first honors on 29 oc-
casions. Of this number, 20 were won
by a unanimous decision of the three
judges, and in all time, she has lost
only two contests by a similar vote.
ier record of 11 successive victories
is unapproached by any other school
in the league, and four of the sucessive
victories were won by a unanimous
decision, a feat which no other uni-
versity has duplicated.
In oratory Michigan's record is o
the same high standard. Ou6 of 22
contests conducted by the Nbrthern
Oratorical League, which is composed
of seven universities of the west, Mich-
igan has won first honors nine times
second honors twice, and third honors
three times. In all, she has won twice
as many honors ¬ęs any of her com-
tetitcrs. Of the first eight contests.
NficfI an w n sev'en,-six of these being
in succession, a feat which no other
school has equaled. in 1908, Chicagc
vithdrew fromh the league, having fail-
ed to win first honors in 16 years, and
her place was taken by Illinois.
Until 1884, the University of Michi-
gan was without a course in oratory
and debating. In this year, Prof
Thomas C. Trueblood, who was, at thai
time, lecturer on oratory at the Uni-
versity of Missouri, Ohio Wesleyan
UIversity and Kentucky University
gave a six, weeks' course in the olk
Alpha Nu hall. Each succeeding year
saw a greater interest in the work. In
1887, the course was given for one
semester, and in 1889, for two semes-
ters in conjunction with the English
department. Three years later, Prof
Trueblood was made full professor of
oratory and to him was given full
charge of the newly created depart-

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's class pre-
sents "Silas Marner," University
Musical Dansante, Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Men's section of Deutscher Verein
meets in Verein room, 8:00 o'clock.
"Blue" number of the Gargoyle on sale
at Stato Street stores.
Mr. W. L. Badger addresses Michigan
section of American Chemical assc-
ciation, room 151, chemistry build-
in, 4:30 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Choral Union concert,, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
"Round-up" dance at the Michigan Un-
ion, 8:30 o'clock.
Weekly "Lounger" at the Michigan
Union, 7:30 o'clock.
Prof. C. O. Davis speaks to Girls Edu-
cational club, Newberry hall, 3:00
o'clock.'
Dr. E. T. Jons lectures before Pres-
cott club, amphitheater chemistry
building, 7:30 o'clock.
FAVOR PLAN FOR
FILING PICTURES
Sekhmn For Preserving Photographs
o6 Seniors Meets Wide
Approval,
CORNELL HAS Soi1LAR SYSTEM
The plan to abolish group pictures
Jf senior classes, and substitute a sys-
em of aing cabinets for individual
photographs has met favor in many
quarters. The followin: men, when
interviewed abut the proposed plan,
expresed thomselVes as follows:
Wilfred B. Shaw.-"Thlmre has been
much agitation about the disposing of
the large group pictures, and I think
this is the most practical way. The
most fitting place for such a collection
would be in Alumni memorial hall.
Any necessary data about the gradu-
ates could be kept on the back of the
pictures. This plan, I think, would be
original with Michigan although the
Cornell engineering department has a
somewhat similar scheme for keeping
their graduates's pictures in order to
give informaton about them when
they apply for positions."
Regent J. E. Beal.-"It would pro-
vide a permanent place for the pictur
away from the dust and dirt. Owing
to the accumulation of the large pic-
tures, it finally becomes necessary to
store them away, and it has often hap-
pened that a man has come back after
15 or 20 years and has wished to see
his class picture, which could not be
found. In the law department the
pictures are hung so high that the de-
.ails are nt visible."
A. C. Pack.-"'I think that the cost
of such a system to the different class-
es would not be as great as the pres-
ent group pictures. Class pictures are
only useful as a record, and such a
picture as the porposed scheme would
make possible would be of more value
or this purpose."
F. J. Rentschler.-"The present
group pictures are almost worthless as
a souvenir, their place having been
taken by the Michiganensian. At the
present time only the dental and hom-
eopathic departments have any proA
erly lighted places left in which to

:ang pictures."
G. L. Maedel.-"Th i roposed system
vould be more satisfactory to the stu-
(Continued on page 4.)

ARRANGE TIME
FOR PRACTICE
OF BASKETBALL
Every Team is Assigned Two Twenty
Minute Periods Per Week
to Prepare For
Contests.
EIGHTEEN TEAMS TO TAKE
PART IN INTERCLASS SERIES
Two Courts at Watrman Gym Arc to
Be Used; Teams Are Indicated
by itimibers.
I3ecauso of the large number of
teams enrolled in the interclass bas-
ketball series this winter and the
small available floor space, Director
Rowe has arranged a schedule of prac-
tice periods for the various classes.
Each team has been allotted two ,20
minute periods per week during which
they may use the courts in Waterman
gyninasium, and they will not be al-
lowed to practice there at any other
time.
There will be two curls at the gym
and two teams are assigned periods
at the same time. Teams will not be
allowed to exchango practice periods,
except by the presentation to Director
Row of a notice of the desired change,
signed by both managers concerned.
To facilitate the arranging of sched-
ules, each team chose a number after
all schedules had been made, with the
end to eliminate controversies over
dates.
Following are the names chosen by
the various classes: soph lits 1; junior
engineers 2; senior lits 3; fresh archi-
tects 4; junior lits 5; junior dents 6;
soph medics 7; senior engineers 8;
junior laws 9; soph engineers 10;
fresh laws 11; senior laws 12; junior
and senior medics 13; fresh pharmics
14; fresh lits 15; fresh homeops 16;
fresh engineers 17; fresh dents 18.
The schedule of pi'actice peflbdi a
now arranged follows:
Tuesdays: 7:00 to 7:20, 1 atm 10;
7:20 to 7:40, 2 and 9; 7:40 t& 0O, 3
and 13; 8:00 to 8:20, 4 and.2;&:24
to 8:40, 5 and 11. Wednesdays: t00;
to 7:20, 6 and 18; 7:20 to 7:40, 7 nd
17; 7:40 to 8:00,8 andl16; 8:00 to 820,
(Continued on page 5.)N
DECLARE CHAIRMA
ILLEGALLY ELECTED
The election of D. R. Ballentine as
general chairman of the soph prom, by
the soph lit class yesterday, was de-
clared unconstitutional by A. R. Grier-
son, president of the class, who stated
that action would be taken to rescind
the motion, on the grounds that the
soph lits exceeded their authority in
appointing a general chairman, with-
out consulting. the other classes, and
also because of the fact that all mat-
ters of a social nature are within the
exclusive power delegated by the con-
stitution to the sodial committee of
the class.
Ballentine was elected by a vote of
the class to act as general chairman
of the prom, and confer with a com-
mittee of eight men to be selected by
himself and the president, who were
to combine with a similar committe
from the soph engineers. This actioi
is contrary to an agreement made be-
tween the soph lits and engineers to

hold a meeting of the social committe
of both classes the first week of next
semester, for the purpose of drawing
up a constitution providing for all de-
tails, including the election of the gen-
(Continued on page 4.)

LEGISLATION IS
PREVENTED BY
DISAGREEMENT
Unwieldiness of Inter-Fraternity Con-
ference Machinery Blocks
Enactment of Positive
Measures.
SIZE OF NECESSARY QUORUM
TO DO BUSINESS IS ISSUE
New ('onstitution and Rushing Reforms
to Be Considered Next
Semester.
The cumbersome legislative machin-
ery of the Inter-Fraternity Confernce
prevented any positive legislative workl
from being accomplished Tuesday
night at a meeting of that organiza-
tion held in the engineering 'building.
The vote required under the present
rules, to pass legislative acts caused a
hopeless deadlock, upon which not
agreement could be reached.
The first question put before the'
body was that of adopting a new con-
stitution. Matters went well until
the question of the size of a quorum
to do business, and the question of the
majority necessary to pass legisla-
tion arose. On these two points the
body was hopelessly split. Several
fraternities held out for a quorum of
three fourths, while the rest favored
one of a mere majority. On the ques-
tion of a majority to legislate, the
trouble arose of whether a majority
should consist of one over half, or if
two thirds of all the organizations rep-
resented should be necessary. All
compromises failed and the matter
will again be taken up after the ex-
aminations.
No definite action could b taken on
the tentative rushing reforms which
were brought up after it was found
that action on th constitution was ab-
solutely Impossible. The trouble here
-arose because several of the delegates
announced thatlthey were unprepared
to vote, having had no definite intrue-
tions from their chapters. The next
meeting of the conference will be held
on the first Tuesday of the second.sem-
ester, at which time it is hoped that
some agreement can be determined
upon.
TALENTED ACTORS
BOOKED BY LEAGUE
Students will be given an unusual
opportunity -to witness splendid act-
ing, thanks to the women's league,
when the Little theater players present
their two productions in Hill auditori-
um, February 6. The actors are of ex-
ceptional talent and the plays have
been chosen especially to interest stu-
dents.
A fair knowledge of the character
of the work rendered by the nationally
famed artists, may be gained from the
comments of the leading Chicago pa-
pers.
Speaking of Mr. Browne's acting in a
recent show, the Chicago Record-Her-
ald says: "This artist does not berate
the public and he does not strike atti-
tudes. He'does his work. It is ithere,
and much of it is most valuable. It
ought to and it will win,.....Last ev-
tening, for example, he proved in his
'quiet way with a backdrop and the dis-
tribution of light, more than David

Belasco with all his clutter ever prov-
es."
The Daily News and the Chicago
Journal also have high praise for the
Little theater.

TICKET SALE FOR FORMAL
DAECE TO OPEN TOMORROW
Tickts for the formal party to be
held at the Union on Thursday of the
second week of exams, will go on sale
at 5:00 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
at $2.00 a couple. Only 90 tickets will
be issued, and the committee expects
an especially large sale, on account of
the absence of the J hop or any other
general formal party.
Special decorations, including an ar-
ray of palms, were planned by the com-
mittee yesterday. Much attention will
be given to the refreshments, which
will be served from 11:00 to 1:00
o'clock.

ALUMNI MVA
DIG PLANS
CHICAGO'
With 100 Men Serving 01
Success of Opera Pr
e in M arelh Seei
Assured.
DETROIT GRADUATES
TAKEN NO AC'T
Name of Opera Not to
Until After Exam
Period.

Argentinian May Enroll in University
It* is probable that Mr. Alberto Cha-
vez, of the Argentine Republic, who is
now on his way to Ann Arbor with
Prof. W. J. Hussey, will register in
the graduate school, according to Prof.
R. H. Curtiss. The Argentinian has
been studying English since It was an-
nounced to him by Professor Hussey
that he would come to Ann Arbor. Mr.
Chavez will aid the local astronomers
in the cooperative study of the skies
of the northern and southern hemis-
pheres which Professor Hussey has
planned.
FACULTY EXPELS
THREE STUDENTS
Pharmic Undergraduates are Charged
With Misrepresentation of
Credits
INVESTIGATION REVEALS FACTS
W. R. Fulton, '14P, F. L. Pierce of
Ypsilanti, and D. P. Rice of Bellaire
0., have been expelled from the de-
partment of pharmacy for misrepre-
sgenting entrance requirements.
Pierce attempted to prove his eligi-
bility for freshmen football this fall.
He was a special student in the liter-
ary department last year, and to makf
up his pharmic requirements he pro-
duced what seemed to be a certificate
from Ypsilanti Normal, but which
could not stand the acid test applied
by the faculty.
Fulton was said to be guilty of help-
ing Rice to fill in certain credits pur-
porting to come from Bellaire high
school . The high school records did
pot show the credit offered, and a:
Fulton could not explain to the fac-
ulty's satisfaction hie was dismissed al-
though his :course was all but comn-
pleted.4
. Acting Dean, A. B. xStevens, stateds
last night that the investigation was
In accordance with the faculty's usual
custom, when the credits are not mail-
ed directly from the preparatory school
On account of these cases a rule has
been adopted that all, certificates in
the future must come directly from the
head of the school from which the
student desires to offer "redit.

active alu

With 100

committees, the Michigan
Chicago propose to make
tion of the Union opera
there Saturday, March 28,
flied success. Active wor
Monday in making a car
Michigan alumni in the ci
ruary 10, the Chicago men
completed the canvass, an
exactly what support will
The Chicago organizati
not only through commit
considerable publicity in
Alumni Bulletin, and by d
Wednesday luncheons and
ni gatherings it hopes t
Union performance even a
cess than last year. The
not been definitely engage
three which are being cor
Illinois is the most proba
According to present p1
era men will journey to
day, March 27, and prese
in the Broadway theater
work has begun among
alumni, but the manager
that there will be no diff
taining the necessary sup
No more steps will be
selection of the cast un
aminations, when the 17

From the 158.men wh
chorus positions Tuesc
50 will be eliminated,
of those remaining wi
week at the Union, on
letin board which coi
notices.
Eligibility will also
ble effect in picking th
(Continued on
SENIORS SOON TO 1H
YEARBOOK RI

I

ment.
Today, Professor Trueblood is Amer-
ica's foremost trainer of collegiate ora
tors, and in the preface of Vol. II of
the Winning Orations of the Interstate
Association is the sentence, "Profes-
sor Trueblood holds the record it
America for training wining orator.
and debaters."
Fourtecn Michigan graduates are
now at the heads of departments .oI
oratory throughout the country.
Charles E. Planshard, '06L, honor de-
bater is at the head of the oratory de-
partment of the Ohio State University,
and John Quincy Adams, '98L, former-,
ly head of th-e oratory department at
Illinois, now holds the same chair at
the University of Louisiana. Edwarr.
P. Trueblood, '8i, brother of Michi-
gan's famus Trueblood, has for many
years been the head of his department
(Continued on page 4.)

Mic
ed,

BLANSHARD HELPS IN
Y. M. C. A. TO
In connctlon with the
campaign conducted last
the Y. M. C. A.- at the
Indiana, A. J. Elliott, E. 4
Paul B. Blanshard, '14,
raising $1,200. "Althoui
every student belongs to
Union, there is-,a big fie
ington for religious wc
Blanshard yesterday. "TI
the plan of mass meeting
and are arranging a seri
evening programs, simi
we hold at the Majestic.
ining the problem there
enthusiastic than ever o
situation."

$1,200

the perso
tions, the
personal
The mo

rship
id by
ty of

e inaiana the most suca
n Bloom- est politician
asserted sonages will
mill adopt tics gathered
i the fall, lar but no 1
Af Sunday will be asked
to those fessors, "snap
ice exam- edge acquired
am more and will be
the local- uestion: Ho'

SOUSED TO

GET AWAY FROM THAT HORSE'S HE
TIf you mEst haERa pony,
READ THE BLUE NUMBER OF

THE

BRIM

THE

GARGOYLE

Exam4
dred jo
coy jovf

WITH REGAR HUMOR.

ouxt today, At e-i1news-t..nd,. Pirice Is

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