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January 20, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1914.

PRICE

JFOR
SPORT
1 umber of Men
MIele-

EVENIS'FOR TODAY
Chorus try-outs for Michigan Union
opera, Michigan Union, 7:00 o'clock.
Prof Thomas M. Iden lectures at 444
South State street, 6:30 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

FARRELL DEMANDS
REGULAR TRAINING
Success of Track Season Tow Depends
on Exanimnation of Next
Two Weeks.

GENERAL CHORUS
TRY-OUTS TONIGHT
Need 32 Men to Fill Opera Background
-Micrascopic Search Made For
"Real" Dancers.
CHICAGO ANXIOUS TO SEE SHOW

MANY QUARTER MILERS

*TI'r

Forestry club smoker in room 407,
gineering building, 8:OQ o'clock.

en-

Although the examinations noiw
loom up as the most important means
of preparing for a successful track
season, Coach Farrell is insistent that

s the only university in the
lich has more men availa-
rsity athletic teams than
according to statistics re-
piled in an investigation of
system at Princeton.
las 3,500 men available for
ns, while Michigan comes
3,462. Columbia, with 3,075
ylvania with 2,400 are the
institutions having more
available men.
of registration of male stu-
eading institutions rank in
ig order: Columbia, Michi-
1, Harvard, Wisconsin, and
Ia.
has more male freshmen
her university in the coun-
roungsters being available
isylvania with 1,300 and
h 1,000 are the only other
where the yearling count
o four figures.
ber of Varsity sports in the
ted varies widely from 19
vania to 4 at Minnesota.
are given as follows: Penn-
, Cornell 15, Harvard 14,
nd Princeton 13, Yale 12,
Visconsin, and Chicago 11,
noa 4.

Soph engineer dinner, Michigan Union,
6.: 00 o'clock.
Recital of "Richlieu" by Prof. T. C.
Trueblood's class, Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Record Crowd Meets Michigander
Prof. Jeremiah W. Jenks; '78, spoke
to the largest crowd that has attended
any of the meetings held by the Y. M.
C. A., in the Majestic theater Sunday
evening. He pointed out the value of
practical Christianity, and insisted on
the worth of scientific analysis in at-
tacking social and religious problems.
SOON TO PASS ON
CONCRETE STANDS
Final action on the plans for the
new concrete stands on Ferry field
will probably be taken at meetings of
the board of regents and the board ini
control of athletics scheduled for the
last of this month.
Harold Weeks, '07E, with a staff of
architects in the engineering depart-
ment, Is now working out the plans
for the new structures.
These will be presented to the board
of regents at the meeting January 27,
and the next meeting of the board of
control of athletics, which will prob-
ably be held on January 31.
WOMEN RECEIVE $50,000 FOR
THIRD RESIDENCE BUILDING
Outstanding subscriptions to the
women's residence halls fnnd, called in
by the committee, assure the sum of
$50,000 needed before work on the
third residence hall can be starttd,
Since December 5, 1913, $2,350 hasl
been received by the local committee
on residence halls for the third hall.
Contributions of individuals is mark-
ed by the exceptionally :generous gift
of Col. Frank J. Hecker, of Detroit,
who has given $1,000. Other dona-1
tions are as follows: R. W. Butterfield,
Grand Rapids, $50; D. M. Ferry, Jr.,
Detroit, $500; Mrs. Abbey Hitchcocki
Bartlett, Chicago, $100; C. H. Gleason,
Grand Rapids, $25; W. A. Grieson,I
Grand Rapids, $10;Mark Norris, Grand
Rapids, $25; Mrs. Edward Lowe,Grand
Rapids, $100; L. S. Crowfoot, Omaha,
$50; E. L. Miller, Detroit, $10; Mrs. O.1
E. Engstmann, Detroit, $5; Dr. E. M.
Mosher, New York City, $100; estate
of late'E, E. King, $100; Mrs. R. M.i
Dyer, Detroit, $25.
LITERARY FACULTY ADOPTS
REVISED LIT-MEDIC COURSE'

M !

Fresh-
men

5,902 3,075
5,036 3,462
4,803 3,500
4,279 1,593
4,237 1,841
L 3,900 2,400
3,300 1,600
3,141 1,638
2,901 500
1,725 925
RKS PROPERTY OF

442
1,731
1,000
660
889:
1,300
900

400

the candidates report to him at least
thee times a week for their workouts,
In this way he hopes to get a line on
the material, so that all will be ready
for a flying start when the final re-
ports of eligibility come in.
When it was thought that there was
a possibility of competition at the Bos-
ton A. A. meet, the two-mile team
was considered the biggest asset on
the Michigan list, but now there is a
good chance that not one, but three
relay teams will represent the Wol-
verines at the Penn games.
If the exams do not claim too heavy
a toll, there will be enough quarter-
mile talent working under Farrell to
form a quartet, independent of the
men who run both the quarter and
the half. It is also probable that the
Michigan coach will try some combi-
nation with the milers, with a view
to forming a four mile team. Michi-
gan was weak in this department of
distance racing last year, but with the
acquisitions from the All-Fresh track
squad, the chances are bolstered con-
siderably.
The competition at the Pennsylva-
nia relay games will assume an inter-
national aspect this year, as entries
have been received from the univer-
sity of Oxford, England. The quar-
tet that will represent this foreign in-
stitution is regarded as formidable by
the Eastern colleges, and they are
looking to Michigan to uphold the
honor of the nation. Oxford has three
men who have run the mile under;
4:25, and these same three are able
to negotiate the half mile under 2
minutes, so it is not certain whether
they will run in the two mile or the
four mile relay.
If they choose to run the two mile
relay, Michigan will be able to meet
them on terms of equality, or better,
with practically the same four that
broke the record for this race at the
last games. Haff, Jansen, and Brown,
of this quartet, are in the university,
and there is a wealth of material to
complete the team with.
Michigan's mile and four mile teams
would not be able to show as well as
the veteran two mile squad, but
would be able to render a good enough
account of themselves to warrant be
ing carried into the East.
MICHIGAN'S DIXIE CLUB MAY
JOIN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION.
At a special meeting held Sunday af-
ternoon at the Union, the Dixie club,
an organization of southern students,
voted to send a delegate to a conven-
tion, which has been called to meet in
Chicago during the early part of Feb-1
ruary, for the purpose of forming a
national association of Dixie clubs.
The national association will have,
nearly all the large universities on its
membership roll.
It was also decided to hold a ban-
quet in Detroit on Thursday, February
5. The exact time and place will be;
decided by the committee in charge
some time this week. Those who in-j
tend to go should call W. J. Goodwin,
'16L, at 1384-L.
Cite Michigan's Union as Model at Yale
In the current issue of the Yale
News, the Michigan Union is described,
together with those of Oxford, Har-
vard, Brown and Wisconsin. Agitation
for a Union at Yale is maturing rap-
idly, and to better inform the college
public, the News described represen-
tative organizations of a similar na-
ture in other universities.
Shocks Not Recorded at Observatory
Seismographic instruments at the'
university observatory recorded no
shocks during the earthquakes in Ja-

pan last week, which leads to believeI
that the disturbances were merely sur-
face phenomena.

Chorus tryouts for the Michigan Un-
ion opra will be held at the Union
at 7:00 o'clock tonight. There are 32
positions to be filled, and from the
number of men who have signified
their intentions of coming out, it is ex-
pected that the competition will be
close. However, men who have any
singing or dancing ability will have
an equal chance. At a second trial,
after exams, the final selection will be
made.
Many prospective tryouts have been
practicing in pairs, and to facilitate
the. elimination tonight, these men are
requested to come together that they
may procure consecutive numbers.
Grace in dancing will be a large fator
in the choosing of the men.
Arrangements have already begun
for the production of the opera in Chi-
cago, Saturday, March 28. Hiram S.
Cody, '08, of Chicago, was in Ann Ar-
bor Sunday, and said .that the Chicago
alumni are especially interested in the
opera. At a meeting of the alumni
Monday, committee work will begin.'
The play will be given much publicity
among the Chicago men, and will be
discussed at Wednesday luncheons,and
other meetings. No definite arrange-
ments have been made in regard to a
theater. Three play houses are being
considered, but it is probable that the
Illinois theater will house the Michi-
gan production.
No contract has been let for the
scenery, but with the modern Euro-
pean setting, the management will
probably rent some of the scenery
from a metropolitan theater, which
has on hand many high class effects,
formerly used by large opera com-
panies.
TO START INTERCOLLEGIATE
CIVIC LEAGUE ONCE MORE
The Michigan branch of the Inter-
collegiate Civic League will perfect
plans for formal organization at a
meeting to be held at 7:00 o'clock to-
night, in room 101, economics build-
ing.
The purpose of the organization is to
act as a "live wire" in respect to civic
and social problems of the present day,
by investigating and making reports
upon the practical aspects of such
problems. These reports will be put
in the form of statistics and will be
available for reference. A committee
has been working on the matter for
some time and has found a rich field
for carrying on investigations in Ann
Arbor and the immediate vicinity.
The Intercollegiate Civic League has
established branches in 60 colleges
and universities of the country, chief-
ly in the eastern part. Michigan form-
erly was represented in the Intercol-
legiate Civic League, but in 1908 the
local body went out of existence, and
was not revived until last Tuesday.
AUTO STUDENTS WILL VISIT
DETROIT AUTOMOBILE SHOW
Prof. W. T. Fishleigh has made ar-
rangements to conduct a delegation of
25 students to Detroit this morning, to
inspect the Chalmers and Lozier auto-
mobile plants and attend the auto
show in the Ford building. The auto-
mobile companies extended a special
invitation through Prof. Fishleigh, and
will provide special demonstrators and
other attractive features.
BADGERS RIVAL MICHIGAN
WITH COSMOPOLITAN TEAM
Michigan is not the only university
which has a cosmopolitan team; as the
recent publication of the international
nature of the Wolverine soccer organi-

zation brought to light a similar one
at Wisconsin.
The Badger soccerites number five
of their eleven members from far dis-
tant parts of the earth. A German,
Peruvian, Chinese, and two Brazilians
are the foreigners appearing on the
Wisconsin line-up.

LITTLE THEATRE COMPANY
hASN.TIO.NAL RE0,PUTATION
The Little Theater of Chicago, whose
players will present Gilbert Murray'%
translation of Euripides' "The Trojan
Women," in Hill auditorium, Friday
afternoon, February 6, is the only or-
ganization in America which is affiliat-
ed with the famous London Actor's
club. It is the smallest theater in the
world, with a seating capacity of only
99, but under the leadership of its
manager, Mr. Maurice Browne, is made
the vehicle for giving to the public the
finest specimens of the drama, regard-
less of popularity or profit, with the
hope of creating in the American mind
a love for that which is best in dra-
matic literature. It is the only the-
ater in America allowed to use Gilbert
Murray's translation of "The Trojan
Women."
A clever comedy, entitled "Joint
Owners in Spain," will be presented
by the same company at the Whitney
theater, on the evening of February 6.
Nellie Van Volkenburg Browne, '04,
who plays Hecuba, the chief role in
"The Trojan Women," will also figure
as the leading character in "Joint
Owners in Spain."

FOR

rERSITY EARLY SUNDAY
ture Occupied by Cleaning
t and Tea Room Is
Destroyed.

Fire of unknown origin completely
destroyed a two-story brick building
on the corner of North University ave-
nue and Twelfth street early Sunday
morning. The building was the prop-
erty of the university and has been.
occupied for some time by the Sani-
tary Cleaners and the Red Rose Tea
Room.
The blaze had gained considerable
headway before the city fire depart-
ment arrived, and, owing to the bit-
ter cold, their efforts were of little
avail. The property is a total loss,
being gutted from cellar to roof, and
only the bare walls remaining. The
loss which is partly covered by in-
surance, will be estimated by the uni-
versity authorities this morning.
SOPH LITS LAUNCH MOVE
TO ADOPT OFFICIAL TITLE
In their second smoker of the sea-
son, given at the Union last night, the
soph lit class started a movement to
adopt some official title for their class,
to be used instead of the customary
appelation. This title is to be used on
all programs and class announce-
ments. Mr. Lyman Bryson, '09, of the
rhetoric faculty spoke, as did other
members of the class.
February 5 Is New Date For Banquet
Because of the final examinations,
the Adcraft club of Detroit has post-
poned its banquet to be given in hon-
or of the members of the Cosmopolitan
club, to February 5. The cosmopoli-
tans are expected to spend the whole
day in the city. when they will be en-

UN

1 1

NEW DIREC'
SELECT C

Athletic Association Directora
Its Reorganization Sessh
Four New Members
Take Seats.
DIRECT ELECTION REFOR2
NOT OFFICIALLY TA]
Athletic Code Book Will Be I
New fTrack Insignia May
Awarded.
The board of directors of t
letic association was reorganiz
meeting yesterday afternoon, a
the four new members, elected
day, assumed their duties, a
new board unanimously elected
es A. Crowe, '14E, as presiden
athletio association.

I

STANLEY MUSIC TO
INTERSPERSE PLAYD
Incidental music to be used in the.
"Scarecrow" will be under the direc-
tion of Earl V. Moore, who is organiz-
ing an orchestra for this purpose. The
music is being written by Prof. A. A.
Stanley,
This is the first time in the history
of dramatics at Michigan that the
management of the Comedy club has
engaged in such comprehensive work.
To date Mr. Moore has no definite idea
as to the competition for the new 'or-
chestra. With less than a month re-
maining before the production of the
play, he feels satisfied, however, that
sufficient talent can be secured to do
justice to the work.
TICKETS FOR FORMAL DANCE
AT UNION WILL BE LIMITED
Tickets for the formal party to be
held at the Union Thursday night of
the second week of examinations will
go on sale at the Union desk at 5:00
o'clock Friday afternoon. The num-
ber will be limited to 90 to make less
crowding than at the usual member-
ship functions. The tickets will sell
for $2.00 per couple, including supper.
Dancing will continue from 9:00 to
2:00 o'clock, and refreshments will
probably be served from 11:00 to 1:00
o'clock. An augmented orchestra will
furnish the music, and special pro-
grams and decorations have been
planned. The committee announced
yesterday that no flowers will be al-
lowed.
GYM DIRECTOR TO FORSAKE
. CALESTHENICS FOR THE HOE
Miss Bigelow Decides to Leave at End
of Semester-Women to Hold
Farewell Party.
Miss Catherin Bigelow will resign
from her position of director of Bar-
bour gymnasium at the end of this
semester, leaving immediately for San
Angelo, Tex., where she and a friend,
Miss Christine Schott, will purchase
a farm. The resignation of Miss Bige-
low was anticipated for next June,
and her sudden resolve to leave the
university has come as a surprise.
The vacancy left by Miss Bigelow
will be keenly felt by the university
women, as she has been director of
Barbour gymnasium for several years,
and is a leader in mbnen's activities.
A farewell party will be given Miss
Bigelow by the university women next
Friday at 4:00 o'clock, in Barbour
gymnasium.
J. R. Allen to Speak in South Bend
Prof. J. R. Allen will speak before
the Knife and Fork club in South
Bend, Ind., tonight, on "Can Americans
Do Business in Turkey." The club is
composed of 400 of the leading pro-
fe'ssional and business men of South
Bend.

The election of student members
the board in control did not come
at the meeting in an official man
and no steps will be taken on t
matter until the time for election. '
four new members of the board, I
old Schradzki, '15L, Varsity footi
manager; Patrick D. Koontz, '14,
terscholastic manager; Harry Ga
'15, treasurer; and Adna R. John
'14, secretary; were all elected
'platforms favoring direct electi
The two members of the board elec
last fall, Charles A. Crowe, '14E, T
sity track manager; and Walter I
mcns, '14E. Varsity baseball ma
ger, have both declared themselves
posed to direct election.
Aside from the reorganization,
board provided for the printing of
by-laws of the association, voted v
sity hats to those members of
board. not already entitled to th
took up the matter of adopting a si
able insignia for those members
the track squad who do not win tt
Varsity letter, and voted the us
athletic association fobs to the c
going members. H. Beach Carpen
'14, interscholastic manager; Moi
A. Milligan, '14, Varsity football ma
ger; Louis P. Haller, '12-'14L, sec
tary, and Albert Fletcher, '14E, tre
urer.
A committee, consisting of Direct
Carpenter and Haller, reported on
codifying of the by-laws and consti
tion of the association. The chan
in the association rules have ne
been taken from the original minu
of the association, and the ame
ments are spread over the proceedi:
of the board for many years past.
The report of the committee was
cepted, and although the -mem(
both retire from the board, they '
continue their work on the bc
which, when completed, will be p
lished and -distributed to the m<
bers of the association.
The board of control last spring ;
vided for the publication of 1,000 c
ies of this report, but the new di
torate will probably provide for a e
siderably larger edition of the b
let, as it will be expanded in conte:
In addition to the by-laws, the r
governing all sports, Varsity and cla
will be published, and the system
Intramural competition explained
(Continued on page 4.)
ELECTION BLANKS MUST BE
FILED EARLY, STATE' RUI
According to regulations made p
lic yesterday it will be necessary I
all students in the literary departn
obtain their second semester elect
blanks at the office of Registrar A
Hall either on Thursday or Frida
this week. One week from that ti
or Thursday and Friday, January
and 30, has been set as the time
the handing in of the blanks, filled
as required. A fine of one dollar
been stipulated as the penalty for
delay in conforming with this '
rule.
Registrar Hall, in making public
rules yesterday, stated that the
cials of the department were advis

Resolutions, providing for a satisfac-
tory adjustment of the combined six-
year literary-medical course, were
proposed and approved at a meeting of
the literary faculty last night. When
they have been passed on by the med-
ical department, they will be submit-
ted to the Board of Regents for official
sanction.
The degree of "Bachelor of Arts" as
of the class of 1913 was granted to sev-
en applicants, and three teachers' di-
plomas were authorized at the session.
Wood to Come During Week of Feb. 22
Major-General Leonard Wood wires
from Washington that he will be able
to speak to the university students the
week of February 22. This is a later
date than was expected by President
Harry B. Hutchins, as a former tele-
gram states that the general would
be in Ann Arbor the first week in Feb-
ruary. He will speak in University
Hall, outlining the military tactics of-
fered to students in summer camps
operated by the government.

I

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