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January 16, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-16

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I y

gan

1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1914.

PRIGC

_

S EVENTS FOR TODAY
15
Michigan-Northwestern debate, Uni-
versity Hall auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.

SCAT!

Fresh engineers informal dance, Mich-
igan Union, 8:30 o'clock.
'Regular women's league party, Bar-
bour gym in afternoon.
"Dental Dansant," annual social func-
tion of dents, Granger's, in evening.

lonor
ed in
o in-
y or-

Virgil 0. Strickler, C. S. lectures at
First church of Christian Science,
409 South Division street, 8:00
o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

fall af-
A-h. ,07

;i4111x "v I

'Michigan Union weekly membership
dance, Michigan Union, 9:00 o'clock.
Fresh Lit "Alphabet" dance, Barbour
gym, 2:30 o'clock.

-R

A questionaire, aiming to compile a
complete record of the distribution of
foreign students in American univer-
sities, has been prepared by Prof. J.
A. C. Hildner, of the German depart-
ment, who is chairman of the board of
advisors to foreign students. One hun-
dred and fifty copies are being printed,
and will be sent to the secretaries of
the various educational institutions
throughout the country.
Nine questions are set forth in the
letter, regarding the number of coun-
tries represented, the number of for-
eign students, the distribution of these
students in the departments, foreign
graduates, the foreign students' organ-
izations, the advisory system, the plans
for procuring room and board for these
students, special classes for the for-
eigners and their general needs.
The result will be published, and
used for reference by the boards; and
copies will be sent to the responsive
schools.

As

I

CAMPAIGI
WITHIN

THE CANDI
-o-
Football Ma
John T. Naylon, '15
Schradzki, '15L.
Interscholastic
Ralph Conger,'14;(
'15; Patrick D.
L. Ford Merritt,

I

GERMAN PROFESSOR COMPILES
RECORDS OF COSIWOPOLITANS

Far as Can Be De
Candidates Are F
Regulations
Council.
* * * * * *
ATHLETIC ASSO

ta STUDENT BOARD
free MEMBERS SPLIT

I

VETERAN TRIO,

OVER BIG ISSUE

TO REPRESENT
NORTHWESTERN

Adna R. Johi
T. Ricketts
Harold B.2
J. Stanley
G. Gault,'
Assistant
Boyd M. Comt
Fee, '16;
'16; Russel

e-

Official Representatives of Campus
Dihide on Direct Eletion
to the Upper
Body-
TWO OF THE THREE NOW IN
HIGHER CHAMBER FAVOR IT
Interviews Show Men to Differ Upon
Qualifications Necessary,
For the Offices.

Men From Evanston Had Experience
in Intercollegiate Contest
Last Year.

BOTH MICHIGAN TEAMS ARE
UP TO PREVIOUS STANDARDS

Chicago Team Is Composed of Three

* Time-Saturday,
* 8:30 to 1:00 o
* Place-Universit:
* Use Coupon No.
*No C~mpaign Ca
* No Pledging of N
* * * * * *
According to opin
several prominent s
the system under w
of the athletic boar
to be elected tomo
way proving the wis

Phi Beta Kappa Men,
All Laws.

Student members of the present'
judgeboard of directors of the athletic asso-
ouri, ciation, three of whom are members
tball of the board in control, are divided in
their opinions regarding the question,
De- of direct election to the upper board.
rsity, Two members of the directorate, Louis
ourt, P. Haller, '11-'14L, and Albert C.
eball Fletcher, '14E, both of whom are
members of the board in control, favor
'96L, the proposed scheme, while the others,
attle, H. Beach Carpenter, '14, member of
was the board in control, Morris A. Milli-
gan, '14, Charles A. Crowe, '14E, and
ress Walter Emmons, '14E, are opposed to
:ber the newly advocated plan.
Interviews with the men follow:
Om- Louis P. Haller.-I am heartily in
and favor of the proposed plan of direct
election of members of the board in
mis- control of athletics. I believe that the
y for present system of indirect election is
er of the most fertile source of misrepre-
7. sentation of the wishes of the student
dent body. Even admitting that there may
liana possibly be a small amount of truth
in the statement that men better versed
it of in athletic matters will be chosen by
larg- the board of directors than by the
atry, students as a whole, still I think that
Vie aim should be not so much to select
r of men who are athletic experts, as to
as a choose those who will represent stu-

p

I, com
ectricit:
) memb
is in '9
3, presi
rn Ind
'85.

SENIOR LIT CANES
WILL BEEXIBITED
Six canes of different style and wood
have been selected by the senior lit cane
committee, preparatory to a definite
choice of the stick the lit seniors will
wear this spring. Final selection will
not be made until the preference of
class members is obtained.
In order that members of the sen-
ior lit class may have opportunity to
inspect the canes, and register their
individual preference, the committee
will have the canes on exhibition on
the ground floor of University hall
from 9:00 to 12:00 o'clock on Satur-
day morning. At this time the com-
mittee will answer all questions con-
cerning the canes, and will record the
individual choice.
At a later meeting the. committee
will make the choice of the cane on
a basis of class preference. If the
opinion secured is not deemed rep-
resentative by the committee, or if too
wide a divergence of-choice is regis-
tered, the committee will make the
final selection itself,
In order that the opinion may be as
near representative as possible, every
member of the senior lit class inter-
ested in the canes is asked to inspect
them some time Saturday morning.
caliber of men who should properly
make up the board. In popular elec-
tions, no matter how many restric-
tions and regulations are placed about
them, it is entirely too easy to influ-
ence the voters by popular appeals'
and it would be comparatively simple
for popular campus idols, and not
competent men, to hoist themselves in-
to the offices. I believe that this would
be a consideration even though the
nomination of candidates were taken

The sixteenth annual series of
tests between the members of theI
tral Debating League, Michigan,
cago, and Northwestern, will be
tonight, one Michigan team mee

MAY A STIRRED
BY HELEN KLLEI

C

Chicago at Chicago, while the other I

I-

VI

A large audience gathered at Hill au-!
ditorium last night to see Miss Helen
Keller, and hear the wonderful story
of a struggle against almost insur-
mountable difficulties. Miss Keller's
teacher, Mrs. Macy, explained how she
had first been able to teach the blind,
deaf, and dumb girl of seven years, by
means of the child's natural interest
for a doll, and described the twenty-
six years of work and patience neces-
sary to bring Miss Keller to her pres-
ent state of ability.
Miss Keller pleased all by her. light-
heartedness .and happiness in her af-
flictions. At the close of the lecture
the audience were given the opportuni-
ty to ask Miss Keller questions. Mrs.
Macey communicated the questions to
Miss Keller by means of placing Miss
Keller's hand on her face while she
talked.
When asked by the reporter about
her ideas on co-education, Miss Keller
replied that she thought the system
much better for women than for men.

and '95.
professo
ersity, w

will dispute with Northwestern in Uni-
versity Hall at 8:00 o'clock.
Northwestern, determined to repeat
the victory of last year, will send a
veteran team, composed of Owen L.
Coon, '16, Adolph M. Wickman, '15, and
Irwin H. Fathschild, '16, all of whom
have taken part in the Northwestern-
Chicago debates.
They will be met by an equally
.strong Michigan team composed of
Louis D. David, '14L, who was Ham-
ilton orator last year. Lyman S. Hul-
bert, '14L, who was Varsity debater on
last year's team, and Karl J. Mohr,
'15L, member of the university cup
team in 1911, and Varsity alternate in
1912.
The other Michigan team, the mem-
bers of which are Sylvan S. Grosner,
'14L, Werner W. Schroeder, '14, and
Samuel Witting, -'15, will meet the
strong Chicago team, composed of
Harry A. Rosenberg, '13-'15L, Arnold
R. Bear, '12-'14L, and Benjamin F.
Bills, '11-'14L, all of whom are Phi
Beta Kappa men.
"Both of the teams representing
Michigan are strong and fully up to
the standard of our previous teams,"
said Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood of the
oratory department. "The debaters
have been carefully drilled and have
their subjects well in hand."
Michigan has had a decided advan-
tage over her opponents in former con-
tests, having won eleven of the six-
teen debates with Chicago and eight of
the thirteen with Northwestern.
The question to be debated is: "Re
solved, That the states should estab-
lish a schedule of minimum wage for
unskilled labor; constitutionality con-
ceded." Michigan will have the affirm-
ative side against Northwestern and
the negative against Chicago.
The local debate will be held under
the auspices of the Oratorical associa-
tion, admittance being by course tick-
etrs or single admission of 25 cents.
Regent Junius E. Beal will preside.

pressed at the policy of g
tude for the candidates in
their qualifications before
At the election held last
choice of baseball and track
no little unfavorable con
heard on the extreme silen
upon the men running for
The amended rules, it is s
successfully met all of the
During the hours of elect
urday none of the. candida
allowed to be near the po
in the corridors of Univers
balloting place. This re
to be rigidly enforced, it
yesterday by a member of
of directors.
The fact that the questio
election of student' memi
board of control is to be ba
Saturday's election has ad
ture to the election which
to bring out an unusually
Campus sentiment has beei
ly aroused by the agitat
question, and it is probab
total of votes cast will be
than that of the fall athle
tion election.

Cen-
Chi-
held

be deter
election Y
proper s
live with:

team in '95 andI

essor of
>ta, was
'95 and

, city editor of the
rald, played base-
,ball in '85, '86 and
rns, manufacturing
Oit, played baseball

tes con-
football'

dent opinion and feel directly respon-
sible to the student body.
Albert C. Fletcher.-I think direct,
election of student members of the
board in control of athletics is a good
thing from the standpoint that it elimi-
nates the possibility of the formation
of rings.
H. Beach Carpenter.-Despite the
popular representation argument, I det
not believe that the results attained
under the proposed system of direct
election of members of the board in
control would be satisfactory. To pick
a student at random off the campus,
and drop him more or less awe strick-
en into the midst of a group of alumni
and faculty men, experienced in athlet-
ic management, would be to make a
farce of the flag-waving, democratic
theories advanced by those who favor
the new plan. The man who can pass
out the glad hand-shake is not usually
the one who is most efficient.
Morris A. Milligan, Varsity Football
Manager.-I do not favor the pro-
posed plan.
Charles Crowe, Manager Varsity

---

out of the hands of the whole student
body and vested in a small and se-
lected board. What does the average
student know about the qualifications
of a certain man for holding an im-
portant athletic office? Would it not
be far better to leave their selection
in the hands of a competent board,
such as is now the case?
Walter Emmons, Varsity Baseball
Manager.-No doubt there are many
advantages to be gained by direct vote
for board in control. As there will be
no members elected this year, my ideas
are not selfish or personal. I sincere-
ly believe that with very few excep-
(Continued on page four)

Edgar C. Best, manager Washburn-
Crosby Co., Minneapolis, played base-
ball in '83.
William J. Olcott, '83, president of
Oiiver Mining Co., Duluth, played foot-
ball in '81.
At present but two large universities
and one small one, Wisconsin, Iowa
and Otterbein, have institutions anal-
agous to the -Michigan "M" club now
being organized among all the men
who have worn the Varsity letter since

THE FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST ANNCUNCES A
FREE LECTURE ON
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
BY VIRGIL 0. STRICKLER, C. S.
MEMBER BOARD OF LECTURESHIP OF MOTHER CHURCH, FIRST
CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST, BOSTON MASS.,
IN THE NEW CHURCH EDIFICE, 409 SOUTH DIVISION ST.
FRIDAY JANUARY 16th, 8:00 P.M.

ow.

Norman Hapgood, editor
Weekly, will be the first
address Prof. F. N. Scott
journalism this spring. M
will be here on February 2,
be followed by two other 4
great prominence, Jacob Ri
ed social worker, who come
and Dean Talcott Williams
itzer School of Journalism
be in Ann Arbor in May to
national convention of Si
Chi, honorary journalistic
E. F. Randolph Marries in
Dr. Earl F. Randolph, '11
Helen Simpson of Salami
York, were married Janua
home of the bride's par
will reside at Poughkeep

'I

- _ _ _ .. . i

athletics have been a recognized in- Track Team.--Under the proposed new
stitution in the university. Older system of leaving the nomination and
schools in the East recognize their for- election of the student members of the
mer athletes by letting them into all board in control open to the student
(Continued on page four) body it would be impossible to get the

Phyllis Dunn Announces Engagement
Phyllis Dunn, '14, announced her en-
gagement, at an announcement dinner
at the Delta Gamma sorority house
last night, to Samuel J. MacKinnon,
of Iron River, Michigan, a former stu-
dent of the University of Virginia, and
a member of the Sigma Chi fraternity.

I

.

7.

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