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January 11, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I1I

'a.

I

L

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 11, 1914.PICE F

IFIES
K AND

L DATES

ornell and Probably M. A. C. to
pear on Ferry Field Next
Fall, Leaving Two Out
of Town Games.
ALL SCEDULE NOT TO BE
[WNCED UNTIL COMPLETED

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Lloyd C. Douglass, in Union Guild se-
ries at Congregational church, 7:45
o'clock.
Miss Margaret Matthews speaks to
university women at Newberry hal.~
4:30 o'clock.,
Regular gathering at the Michigan
Union, 2:30 o'clock.
Dr. W. G. Puddefoot at the Majestic
Theater, 6:30 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Cosmopolitan club's seventh annual
banquet at the Michigan Union, 8:00
o'clock.

COMEDY CLUB'S
PLAY PLEASES
DRAMA LEAGUE!
Mrs. Ladd, Who Witnessed Rehearsal
Yesterday, Expressed Herself
Delighted With
Production.
"DUTY ALONE NEED DRAW NO
ONE TO WITNESS SCARECROW"

STUDENT VOTES
SHOULD SELECT
SAY VIGILANTS
Possible Reorganization of Former!
"Ring" Would be Stopped by
Direct Election
System.
ACTIONS OF PRESENT MEN
MEET WITH APPROBATION

TWO 2XICHWAN EN CHOSEN
BY NENORAR ASSOCIATION
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, of the eco-
nomics department, was elected pres-
ident, and Isador Becker, '15, secreta-
ry, of the Intercollegiate Menii'ah as-
sociation, at the second annual con-
vention, held in the city of New Yor.,
December 29, 30, and 31. Representa-
tives of 22 of the 30 societies belonging
to the association, were present' at the
meeting, and many of the nation's
foremost citizens were in attendance..
Former Prof. Made Dean of Forestry
Prof. Walter Mulford, a former pro-
fessor of forestry at Michigan, and
now dean of forestry at Cornell, has
been selected as dean of the forestry
department which will be organized
next year at the University of Califor-
nia.
WIGPUDDEFOOT. TC
LECTURE. TONIGHT

GENERAL F

DIRECT Cl
SCHEME

Twenty-five Random Interviei
whelmingly in Favor of Sti
Election of Members t
Board in Control.
THE FEW OPPOSED TO PLA
DO NOT WANT NAMES Q

Definite Report Submitted
Committee in Charge of
Concrete Stands.

by

* * * * * * * *
AGAN'S TRACK SCEDULE
--o-
[, 7-Soph-Fresh Indoor
4t, Waterman gym.
h~ 14-Varsity-Syracuse, at

*:

* March 14-All-Fresh-M. A. C., *
* Waterman gym.
* March 21-Varsity meet, Water- *
* man gym. *
* March 28-Varsity-Cornell, Wat- *
erman gym.
* OUTDOOR *
* April 24-25-Penn Relays at *
* Philadelphia. *
* May 2-Cornell, Ferry field. *
* May 9--Varsity meet,Ferry field. *
* May 16-Syracuse, Ferry field. *
May 22-23-Michigan Interscho- *
* lastic, Ferry field. *
* May 29-30-Eastern Intercolle- *
* giate. *
* -*0- *
* MICHIGAN'S 1914 FOOTBALL *
* SCHEDULE *
* October 3-Case at Ann Arbor. *
* October 10-Vanderbilt at Ann *
* Arbor. *
* October 17-M. A. C. at Lansing *
* or Ann Arbor (Negotiations *
* pending,) *
* October 24-Syracuse at Syra- *
* cuse. *
* October 31--Harvard at Cam- *
* bridge. *
* November 7-Pennsylvania at *
* Ann Arbor. *
* November 14-Cornell at Ann *
* Arbor. *
* * * * * * * * * * *
Michigan's 1914 track schedule, both
for indoor and outdoor meets, and the
1914 Varsity football schedule were
ratified at a meeting of the board in
control of athletics last evening at the
office of the athletic association.
The indoor track schedule contains
no surprises. It lists the usual dual
meets with Syracuse and Cornell, Syr-
acuse at Syracuse on March 14, and
Cornell at Ann Arbor on March 28.
A feature is the dual meet between the
All-Fresh team and the M. A. C. Var-
sity on March 14, while Michigan's
Varsity team is meeting the Orange-
men at the Salt City.
The outdoor schedule provides for
Michigan's attending the Penn relays
at Philadelphia on April 24 and 25.
for Cornell at Ann Arbor on May 2.
Syracuse at Ann Arbor on May 16, and
the Eastern Intercollegiate meet on
May 29 and 30, besides the usual Var-
sity meet May 9. The Interscholastic
meet for Michigan preparatory schools
is set for May 22 and 23.
The 1914 football schedule, as rati-
fied, fulfilled expectations. The play-
ing dates are the same as have been
predicted, with Pennsylvania playing
at Ann Arbor on November 7, and Cor-
nell at Ann Arbor on November 14.
The M. A. C. game on October 17 may
be played either at Ann Arbor or Lan-
sing. Negotiations are still pending,
and it is hoped the Agriculturists will
consent to play on Ferry field.'
Michigan's baseball schedule was
(Continued on page 6.)

WOMEN INVITE ALL.
TO, ICECARNIVAL
Everybody, including the merest
man, will be welcome at the ice car-
nival to be sponsored by the Women's
League, Wednesday evening at Wein-
berg's rink. The committee in charge,
under the chairmanship of Beatrice
Merriam, '14, has taken over the rink
for the evening, and the proceeds will
go into the treasury of the league.
Admission to the affair will be 15
cents. Tickets may be obtained from
the members of the committee: Jessie
Cameron, '14, Honora Fogerty, '15,
Clara Roe, '15, Anna Benjamin, '15,
Anita Kelley, '17, Beatrice Lambrecht,
'16, Jean Scott, '14. Admission cards
will also be on sale at the gate.
Band selections will be a part of the
evening's program. The ice is said
to be in excellent condition, and if the
cold weather continues, those in
charge expect a capacity crowd.
PLANS FOR SELF-RY7LE TO
BE DISCUSSED BY WOMEN
Mass-Meeting on Tuesday Will Hear
Professor Lloyd Concerning
1915 Work.
A mass-meeting of all university
women has been called by the self-
government committee for 4:00 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon, January 13, in Bar-
bour gymnasium, at which plans for
self-rule will be outlined, and an at-
tempt made to ascertain the general
attitude of the women toward this
new movement.
Professor A. H. Lloyd, as chairman
of the investigation committee on
house-clubs, will speak about the pro-
posed work of that body for 1915, and
the need for self-government in bet-
tering general conditions. Miss Gil-
lette of the university library staff,
will discuss the need and possibilities
for obtaining quiet and better study-
ing conditions in the general library,
which is the first reform that the self-
government committee wishes to bring
about.
Dr. Geisel Advocates Simple Diet
Dr. Carolyn Geisel, member of the
faculty of the Shorter College for
Girls at Rome, Ga., said she went
through the Michigan medical college
on a diet of chocolate creams and cof-
fee, in speaking at the Race Better-
ment Conference at Battle Creek Fri-
day. Dr. Geisel's ambition is to es-
tablish a chair of health and house-
hold economics for every col-
lege in the United States and
to have these institutions re-
strict girls as to diet and dress.
Dr. Geisel further stated that if as
many hogs died before 'maturity as
children, die at birth or soonn after,
stockmen would stop raising hogs.

Considers This Most Pretentious Choice of Five Thousand Can Make
Undertaking for University Political Schemes Less
Dramatic Club. Practicable.
"I shall certainly try to get the Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Drama League's endorsement of 'The Do not mistake us. We asked you
Scarecrow,'" said Mrs. A. L. Ladd, to raise the direct election issue be-
president of the Ann Arbor Center of cause student opinion should be rep-
the Drama League of America, yes- resented by the student members of
terday after having witnessed the af- the board in control. There must be
ternoon rehearsal of the Comedy club. a direct election if this is to be at-
"~iopti iwia elne e

"To put it mildly, I am delighted be-
yond measure with as much of the pgy
as I have seen," she continued; "I had
understood that the cast this year was
one of exceptional ability, but I was
not prepared for as finished a produc-
tion as I have just witnessed. The
club, too, is to be highly congratulat-
ed on its selection of a play. 'The
Scarecrow' is undoubtedly a wide de-
parture from what I understand have
been the previous plays. Duty alone.
need draw none to witness 'The Scare-
crow.'"
Mrs. Ladd is a graduate of Brown
University, and during her many years I
residence in the east, attended per-
formances given by all the leading
eastern schools. She st'ated that this
was a more pretentious undertaking'
for a university dramatic club than

Opposition Argi
Interview, 'A
Seve

tamed with any degree of certainty.
Mr. Editor, we fully appreciate the
worth of the present student members
of the board in control. It is the first
time in our memory, since student
opinion has been represented. They
voted with us on the band, on the Har-
vard game. We are more than satis-
fled with them.
But we are looking to the future,
and we are trying to profit by the
past. It took great efforts to get the
present students in office and we feel
that the "ring" will get into action
again unless the greatest care is exer-
cised We would settle the matter In
one stroke by putting the election be-
fore the entire student body.
It is much more difficult to work
politics, swap votes, with five thousand
of us than it is in an organization of
six or seven members.
The fundamental principles of de-

Dr. W. G. Puddefoot, of Indianapolis,
Ind., will speak, under the auspices
of the Y. M. C. A., in the Majestic the-
ater at 6:30 o'clock tonight. He vis-
ited Ann Arbor earlier in. the season,
and is returning because of the large
number of people who were unable to
hear him at that time. As an annual
guest of many of the eastern universi-
ties for the past 15 years, Dr. Pudde-
foot has given addresses recently at
Yale, Harvard, Amherst, and Brown.
Dr. Puddefoot began his work by
traveling in Northern Michigan in the
interests of home missions, before the
churches had been established in the
territory. He is engaged by the Con-
gregational church in conducting mis-
sionary activities in Indiana.
Although more than 70 years old,
Dr. Puddefoot is a man of remarkable
vigor, and frequently delivers two
speeches daily. He comes here after
talking to an audience in Detroit. His
virile delivery, coupled with the hum-
orous style employed,' xakes idn a
most entertaining and effectiveorator.
He is noted for his up to date views
on theological questions.
Motion pictures at 6:10 o'clock will
precede the program and special music
is to be provided.

Campus opinion, as revealed
random interviews by The Mic
Daily yesterday, is overwhelmin
favor of the direct election of st
members of the board in cont
athletics.
Only a few were found oppos
the new plan, and they were unv
to be quoted," or have theiri
used. The only argument
against the new plan was tha
present system of elevating thi
the five student members of the
of directors resulted in the sel
of men for the upper board wi
familiar with athletic matters.
view point is met by the intervi
Edward Kemp, which appears,
others, below.
Edward G. Kemp, '14L.-"The
dent members of the board in cc
are there theoretically to reflec
dent opinion, and therefore I
their direct election. The st
members of the board in contr(
not there to run athletics morE
ciently-we have other men for
Therefore, the viewpoint that the
sity managers are especially equ
for the places on the board in cc
is a mistaken one. When I vol
the football manager I do not

any which had even come to her atten .. mocracy are at stake in this matter.
tion. "But," she added with a smile, -VG. COM.

"it is quite evident that it is none too
pretentious for Michigan.
The Comedy club is naturally quite
elated at the possibility of endorse-
ment by the local center, for the
league aims to aid none but the most
deserving of dramatic performances.
The object of the organization is not
so much to elavate the stage, as it is
to first find a deserving play and then
elevate the public to the stage. This
is the first university production which
the League has ever considered en-
dorsing.
Faculty Men Attend Joint Convention
The annual joint eastern meeting of
the Modern Language association of
America and of the American Philo-
logical society held in Cambridge,
Mass., under the auspices of Harvard
University, December 29-31, was at-
tended by some 15 present and former
members of the faculty of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Among them were
Profs. D'Ooge. Scott, Tatlock, Wagner,
Bonner, and Sanders; and Messrs.
Talamon, McLaughlin, Robbins, Hurl'.
hurt, and Fay. A number of papers
were read by several of the Michigan
men.

Y. F. J. HSU, '14, TO SPEAK
AT UNION THIS AFTERNOON
In addition to several musical num-
bers, this afternoon's program a t he
Union will contain a talk by Y. F.
Jabin Hsu, '1. He will take up chief-
ly a discussion of the system employ-
ed by the Chinese. government in send-
ing a certain number of native sons to
American colleges and universities
each year.
Secreteary Bryan Passes Through City
A few students, who went to the
Michigan Central station to see Sec-
retary of State William Jennings Bry-
an, as he passed through here yester-
day afternoon on his way to the Jack-
son Day banquet in Jackson, were re-
warded for their long wait when the
"Peerless One" came oito the plat-
form of his Pullman and in response
to the signs of greeting, took off his
hat and bowed to those present. The
train on which the Secretary traveled,
was held in Detroit about half an hour
so that he might finish his speech be-
fore the Board of Commerce of that
city.

I -,-

DOCTOR ANGELL WILL SPEAK
AT COSMOPOLITAN'S BANQI
President-Emeritus James B. Ang
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins, Secret
Shirley W. Smith, Regent Junius
Heal and Assistant Secretary Lee
Pierce, of the Grand Rapids Con
cial club, will be the principal spe
ers at the anniversary banquet of
Corda-Fratres Cosmopolitan club
morrow evening at 7:00 o'clock at
Union.
President Juan Bonilla, '15, of
local organization, will outline
work that the club is doing for,
state. Prof. James P. Bird, of the
gineering department, will officiate
toastmaster; and President C.P. Wa
of the Chinese students' club will :
resent the foreign students. Se
commercial secretaries and the a
number of regents, and many pro
neat local business men have cons
ed to be present. Efforts are bi
made to secure Booker T. Wash
ton to be present at the annual fi
tion.
Penn Football Squad Holds Pra4
The Pennsylvania football sq
held an outdoor practice on Fran
field last week. The main idea wa
teach Michael Dorsias, a Greek
lete, how to play the game. C
Brooke has offered three prizes
the men who show the greatest
crease in speed at the close of thev
ter's training.

',

OD'EQAYTEDIAM Cor. Huron and
IDivision Street
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
ROY W. HAMILTON, Student Pastor
10:30 A. M. "The Source of Power"
12 . Bible Classes for Students
6:30 F. M. C. E.

in- in
'in' all

...

UNION SERIES
TONIGHT

LLOYD

C.

DOUGL AS

"PILATE'S PRIVATE OFFICE"

*1

i

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