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January 08, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1VII

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 8, 1914.

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EVEN TSIOR TODAY
Dixie Club smoker at the Michigan
Union, 8:00 o'clock.
Gym classes for men start with the
11:00 o'clock section.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

I'

{r

ned Michigan Union and Cos-
olitan Club smoker at the Mich-
Union, 7:30 o'clock.

Dr. Newell D. Hillis on Oratorical As-
sociation program in University
Hall auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Bridge Tournament resumes at the
Michigan Union, 8:00 o'clock.
Fresh Law inaugural dinner dance at
Granger's, 9:00 o'clock.
Dr. James B. Angell addresses Girl's
Education Club at Newberry Hall,
3:00 o'clock.

td

h Lounger at the Miehigan Union.
o'clock.

8:00

CLASS ATHLETES
ARE NOW ACTIVE
Indoor Track, Basketball and Ilockey
Occupy Greater Part of
Attention.
BIG BASKETBALL RACE LIKELY
Indoor track, basketball and hockey
will occupy the attention of the class
athletes from now until after the
spring' vacation, when baseball will
begin.
During the holiday recess the bas-
ketball enthusiasts who remained in
Ann Arbor formed a Vacation League.
of four teams in which the seniors fin-
ally won the title from the freshmen
in a strenuous series of 50 games.-
A half dozen contests were staged
every morning,,with about 55 men par-
ticipating in the s;ort. Director Rowe
is well pleased with the experiment,
and expects the men who got in shape
over the holidays to place on the vari-
ous class aggregations during the in-
ter-class series.
The annual interclass track and
basketball series will not begin until
after examinations, but many of the
men are working out for their own
benefit in praparation for the competi-
tion for places.
Half a dozen more teams than have
ever competel in a campus series are
already signed up for the basketball
race, and 16 classes are represented.
Director Rowe desires that any other
classes intending to enter, make ar-
rangemnents at once as the schedule
will soon b drawn up.
Hockey players are asked to report
to Director Rowe this week, in order
that the departmental teams may be;
organized, and the plans for the ice
sport completed. Arrangements
will be made for practice hours andt
games- at a local rink, if satisfactory
terms can be obtained. Otherwise an
asphalt court on South Ferry fieldt
will be constructed a'nd flooded' for the
skaters.

!tIUB TO
PLAY FEB. 12

OR, NDHILLIS TO
TALK TOMORROW

I

"The America of Today and
row" to Be Subject
Speaker's Address.

Tomor-
of

TWO CHINESE STUENTS HAVE
RECEIVED IN'TMCE OF RECALL

RESUME
OF PR

IS REGULAR ORATORICAL NUMBER
Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis, noted

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re-

depart-
putation
nation-
'n froir

Efforts to Prevent Postponement of
"Searecrows Have Proved
Futile.
ELIGIBILITY MAY AFFECT CAST
Negotiations between the manage-
ment of the Comedy club and the Ora-
torical Association regarding a change
of date for the production of the
"Scarecrow" have ended in a postpone-
ment of the play from January 16, to
Thursday, Feb. 12-Lincoln's birthday.
Futile efforts were made to avoid
postponing the production. The Com-
edy club offered to guarantee the Ora-
torical Association their usual re-
ceipts for t ew6ia . :Northwestern
debate, but no agreement could be
reached. Since the Association had
succeeded in registering its date first,
the Comedy club was forced to give
way.
The change in date will necessitate
a let down in the rehearsal work for
the next two or three weeks, in order
to prevent the cast from becoming
overworked. After that time, how-
ever, the regular program of rehears-
als will be resumed and continued un-
til the play is actually presented.
The postponement of the date has
also brought to light another unlooked
for complication. The play as it. is
now scheduled will be given next sem-
ester, and the question of the eligibil-
ity of the members of the cast must
be taken into consideration. It is ru-
mored now that one of the leading
parts will be left vacant, after the ex-
amination period, and those in charge
are casting about for means whereby
the place may be filled in case such
a contingency should occur.
BIG RELIGIOUS MEETING OF
STUDENTS PROVES SUCCESS
Sixty Undergraduates Are Delegates
to Volunteer Convention
in Kansas City.
"The Student Volunteer Convention
was the most convincing demonstra-
tion of the reality of religion as a vital
force in the world, that I have ever
seen," declared Frank i. Olmstead, '15,;
yesterday, in speaking of the recent;
gathering in Kansas City, Mo. More;
than 5,000 delegates from American,
universities and prominent missionary
workers from the foreign fields attend-
ed the mammoth gathering in the Con-
vention hall. The list of speakers in
cluded Dr. John R. Mott, William Jen-
nings Bryan, George S. Eddy, Dr. Rob-
ert E. Speer, Rev. Samuel M. Zwemer.1
Michigan was represented by 60 del-
egates; among whom were H. Beach]
Carpenter, '14, Fred B. Foulk, '13-'15L,
Selden Dickinson, '13-'15L, John Bo-
nilla, '15M, Paul B. Blanshard, '14,1
Ralph M. Snyder, '12-'14L, and Frank
I. Olmstead, '15.
. Fennell P. Turner has charge of the
next meeting in 1918, and will send a,
committee to Ann Arbor to determine;
what accommodation can be secured.
In case satisfactory arrangements arer
offered, indications are favorable that
the convention will be brought here.,

preacher, lecturer and author will
speak on "The America of Today and
Tomorrow" Friday eveing in Uni-
versity hall auditorium, under the aus-
pices of the Oratorical association.
This lecture, scheduled for Decemberj
1, was postponed at that time owing'
to his illness.
Pastor of the historic Plymouth
church of Brooklyn, which Henry
Ward Beecher- made famous through
his wonderful eloquence, Dr. Hillis
has proven a worthy successor, and is
regarded as the most distinguished
minister in America today. Before be-
coming pastor of Plymouth church
which position he has held during the
past thirteen years, Dr. Hillis had
made an enviable reputation for him-
self in Central Music hall, Chicago.
Course tickets to the Oratorical as-
sociation lectures or 50 cents single
admission will be charged.- In pur-
suance of the policy of the Oratorical
association this lecture will begin
promptly at 8:00 o'clock. The audi-
ence is requested to be seated five
minutes before this time.
RAILROAD TO EMPLOY ONLY
COLLEGE MEN AS ENGINEERS
Students in civil engineering will be
interested to hear that officials of the
Sante Fe railroad have just issued or-
ders that no men will be employed in
the construction department who are
not college graduates. Any person
now employed as civil engineer by the
company will not be promoted if any
graduate engineer is eligible for the
office.

Notice has been received by two
Chinese students at the university, K.
Y. Wang, '16, alId L. Yu, '17, to the
effect that they le recalled by the
Kiangsi provincial government on the
ground that they took no examination
before coming to this country. Nego-
tiation is going on at present between
Hon. T. T. Wong, director of the Chin-
ese Educational mission to the United
States, and the Kiangsi government
for the withdrawal of the recall. A
statement by Pres. Harry B.Hutcthins,
reporting favorably upon the schol-
arship of the two students, was includ-
ed in the petition for the withdrawal.
Wang and Yu were two of the four
mission students sent by the govern-
ment of Kiangsi province to America
in the spring of 1913. They submitted
themselves for examination before be-
ing sent from China; but the educa-
tional commission of that province
excused them on the scholastic rec-
ords in their preparatory schools.

WARNING GIVEN TRESPASSERSIYOST APPEARS IN NEW ROLE

;.

s in the best
the country.
he school was'
it of one year
'ance, and the
that this will
idance, event-
his year over
ers of the de-
students, and
iss is 100 per
last year, al-
explained by
requirements

Superintendent of Ann Arbor Railroad
Cautions People Not to Use
Tracks.
d Owosso, Mich., Jan. 7.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
The railroads are very ambitious to
correct unsafe conditions and practic-
es and for that purpose many of the
lines have "Safety First" committees.
One of the most difficult problems
with which our committee has to do
with is the trespassing of outsiders
on our tracks. It seems most difficult
to have the public understand that this
is a dangerous practice and that more
people are killed by trespassing than
all other accidents put together.
The Michigan students use our
tracks regularly, and walk over the
Huron river bridge, which is surely
very dangerous and will eventually
cause the loss of lives and injuries.
A. SYVERSON,
Superintendent of Ann Arbor Railroad.
H. E. YNmZDIA, HOPE COLLEGE,
PICKED AS RHODES SCHOLAR
H. E. Yntema, A.B., Hope College,
and a student in the graduate depart-
ment, was awarded the Rhodes schol-
arship from the state of Michigan at a
meeting of the Rhodes committee in
Ann Arbor, December 29. There were
eight who successfully passed the ex-

Writes Article in Collier's Weekly on
"Western Football Against
Eastern."
Fielding H. Yost, Michigan's fam-
ous football coach has gained honors
in a new field-that of magazine writ-
ing. The Wolverine gridiron wizard
is the author of an article entitled
"Western Football Against Eastern"
which appears in Collier's Weekly for
January 10.
The article begins in true "Hurry-
Up" style and states that the "Open
Game, or Western Football" has come
to stay. In his article the coach goes
on to back up this assertion with
many examples, not confined to Mich-
igan's play, or of the play of western
against eastern elevens, but drawn
from such contests as the Yale-Har-
vard game of 1913 and the Army-Navy
game of the same season. He also as-
serts that Walter Camp, dean of the
eastern critics, acknowledges the pos-
sibilities of the open style of play.
The article, written in characteristic
Yost style is extremely interesting,
especially to students of Michigan who
have had an opportunity of seeing the
coach drill Wolverine teams.
UNION DINNER PROMISES TO
SURPASS DECEMBER SUCCES,

COUNCIL CHANGES
TO BE CONSIDERED
Two New Plans For Reorganization
Have Been Suggested by
Students
BOTH PROPOSE RADICAL CHANGE
The establishment of a trial court,
composed of seven seniors, one from
each department, existing separate
from the student council, is the chief
point of departure in the latest plan
for the reorganization of the council.
A second plan, now being developed.
is still more radical, in that it would
abolish the student council, and put
in its stead five commissioners, who
would have all the necessary powers
of government.
The first plan would leave the coun-
cil proper to handle legislative and
executive matters, while the judiial
powers of the student's self-governing
body, would be vested entirely in the
distinct court. The court would be
composed of seven members, one froir
each senior class. Election would be
made from a number of candidates
who had been nominated orally, at a
regular class meeting.
The reason given as support to the
new plan is that by dividing the du-
ties of the councilmen, the efficiency
of the body would be raised. It is claim-
ed that member of the council have
found it impossible to keep up thei
activities in other campus affairs, and
attend to their council duties, when
careful investigation of charges against
students is needed, as 'in the J-Ho
riot of last year, and the Pennsy game
disturbance last fall.
The "commission form of govern-
ment" plan would have five men elect-
ed from the campus at large. This
body would appoint all necessary com-
mittees, and would stand responsible
for the acts of its appointees. Elec-
tions would be held according to the
Bruce-Hulbert system.
The discussion of the different plans
is scheduled for 7:30 o'clock tonight,
in the north wing, of University hall.
S. W. BEAKES, '83L, TO TALK
IN JACKSON ON SATURDAY.
William Jennings Bryan, secretary.
of state, and Samuel Willard Beakes
'83L, congressman from the second
congressional district of Michigan,
will be the principal speakers at the
49th annual banquet of the Andrew
Jackson Association of Jackson Coun-
ty, Michigan, to be held at Jackson
Michigan, Saturday, January 10. Sev-
eral hundred tickets have already
been sold for the affair.
Immediately following the banquet,
Mr. Beakes will leave for Washington,
D.- C., where he will resume his work,
Monday, January 12.
Observatory- Director Sails for Home
Prof. W. J. Hussey, Director of the
Observatory, begins his long journey
to Ann Arbor today from South Amer-
ica, where he has established a nation-
al observatory for the Republic of Ar-
gentina at the University of LaPlatte.
He will probably be in Ann Arbor
about the first of February.

. .

l

First Tryowts Will Be Held Next W
Wh et Director St. John
.a n Arrange to
Be Present.
CHORUSES THIS YEAR TO BE
MORE ELABORATELY COSTUN
Considerable Work Has Been Done
Music; Score Now Being
Printed.
With the reopening of the unive
ty, the manager and assistants of
1914 Michigan Union opera have
sumed active work on the ann
show, and in a short time hope
llave the production on the lastl
toward the final presentation. Ma
of the men have been active during
cation, and all of the cast tryouts a
now familiar with the lines.
The next tryouts will be held son
time next week, the exact days- <
pending on the time when Direci
Bert St. John will be in Ann Arb
The men who were picked at the p:
liminary trials, with the exception
a few who were definitely chosen
first will be given another trial. Pa:
will be assigned immediately after
Chorus tryouts will also be he
next -week, and on account of t
greater number, the elimination w
probably be more difficult than in t
case of the cast performers. All m
in the chorus of the 1914 show w
be more elaborately outfitted than
the case of previous operas.
Considerable work has also be
done on the music during vacath
Willis A. Diekema has most of h
work in final shape, having writt
the prelude and finale, as well as so
of th. eodies. Songs by seve
other men' were tentatively chosen 1
fore vacation, and the advisiability
all of the compositions will be definil
ly determined' previous to the fi
tryout next week. The selections w
be used at this time, and. then sent
the printer to be incorporated in t:
score.
UNION AND COSMOPOLITAN
CLUB TO MEET AT SMOKI
Affair Will Be Held Tomorrow; Pr
gram Arranged by Members
of Both Organizations
For the first time since their orga
ization, the Michigan Union and t
Cosmopolitan club will hold a combi
ed smoker, tomorrow evening at 7:
o'clock at the Union, in the form of
"get-acquainted" gathering. A pr
gram to be given by members of bo
cangknizations will be presented.
William James, '16D, who has be
a professional-actor for more th
eight years, will sing a few song h
from his favorite plays, while W.
Pan, '15E, will execute several "gra
es" of an exhibition of shuttlecoc
the common game in Chinese schoo
Chase Sikes, '16E, will render a voc
solo. S. L. Adelsdorf, '14L, one of t
stars in last year's opera, is schedul
to give a German monologue, and Be
jamin Weuling will also recite sor
selections. An orchestra under t
direction of Martin Ten Hoor, '13, w
feature several international airs.
Harry Gault, '15, and Ten Hor, a
chairmen of the special committe
appointed by the Union and the Cc
mopolitan club respectively.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC ACQUIRES
SITES FOR FUTURE ADDIT(
With the purchase of the Hartley a:
Whiting properties for $8,000 a:
$6,000 respectively, the Universi

Musical society has taken the initi
step toward erecting the propos
$200,000 addition. This sale was e
fected Saturday, and recorded Mo
day afternoon. The property is loca
ed on Williams and Maynard stree
The purchase will give the society po
session of the entire south side of W
liams street, from Maynard to the Ce
gregational church.

e year

3. Hinsdale, who received
aduate degree at Hiram
later graduated from the
hospital college of Cleve-
?n dean of the department
is a frequent contributor
hic journals, and was last
at of the American Insti-
eopathy.
ewey, secretary of the de-
d professor of therapeut-
ria medica, is chairman of
of Medical Education, and
d four books on homeo-
ts, one of which, "Essen-
eopathic Materia Medica,"
rough four English edi-
s published in German,
Portugese.
'ed and sixty-five students

amination, the selection being upon With the monthly membership din-
scholastic excellence and personality. ner to be held at the Union next Wed-
The- committee of selection compris- nesday the dinner committee hopes to
ed: President Harry B. Hutchins, maintain the standard set at the caba-
chairman, Chief Justice Steere, of De- ret dinner held in December. Chicken
troit, Dean J. R. Effinger, President will again be the central feature on
B. W. Anthony of Adrian College and the menu. An orchestra will play
President Samuel Dickey of Albion during the meal, and the tables will
College. be arranged in cabaret fashion. Tick-
ets will probably go on sale Saturday
Professor R.T. Crane Ill With Typhoid at the Union desk.
Prof. Robert T. Crane, of the polit- Mimes will provide a skit, a mando-
ical science department, who was seiz- lin club quartet will furnish several
ed with an attack of typhoid fever numbers, and Prof. A. L. Cross, of the
during the holidays, is now reported history department, has promised to
as recovering. His condition will pre- speak. A clogging number will be
vent him from meeting his classes furnished by ,A. O. Williams, '14E, and
during the remainder of the semester, H. C. Tallmadge, '14. Other numbers
however, and Professor Jesse Reeves will be booked, all of the events being
has taken his place. short, and' of a vaudeville nature.

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