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January 07, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-07

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Shoes

II

LYN- Kodaks and Photo I

DON

Supplies

AMATUER FINISHING

Latest English Lasts

Pr

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More Comfortable than Slippers

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108 S. MAIN STRELT
ANN ARBOR

FF ON ALL MILLINERY
Beavers Excepted, at-
erty East DANA RICHARDSON

0,At The BEST TABLES
In ANN ARBOR
our Frozen Delioacles have a permanent
placeJ

CAiPtlltS Y BRIE1,F.,
--Fresh laws will hold their inaigu-
rance at 9:00 o'clock Friday night
atGrangers.
---Frank Pennell, '14L, editor of The
Michigan Daily last year, has resigned
his position as city editor of the Brad-
ford Era, at Bradford, Penn., to accept:
a staff appointment on the Cincinnati,
Western Underwriter. He takes up his
new work (t once.
-Dr. Das id Steiner, '8311, died in
his home at Lima, Ohio, December 27.
For four years Dr. Steiner was an as-
sistant professor in the medical de-
partment, and an interne in the uni-;
versity hospital.
-The Western college Newspaper as-
sociation, at its meeting in Chicago on
December 20, decided to hold its spring
meeting in Ann Arbor, May 1 and 2,'
at the same time at which Sigma Delta
Chi, the honorary journalistic frater-
nity, will hold its national convention
here.
-The December inmber o; The Cos-'
mopolitan Student, the last issue pub-
lished at Wisconsin, has made its ap-
pearance. Members of the Cosmopoli-
tan club may obtain copies from Fred
B. Foulk at The Michigan Daily offices.
--Iteporis of the Intercollegiate chess
match in Chicago will be given out at
the Chess and Checkers club meeting
at the Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight.
-During the Chribtmas recess Prof.
F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric department,
went to Cambridge where ha read a

SCHEDULE FOR 1914
PARTLY ARRANGED
While the list of playing dates for
the 1914 football schedule has not been
made public, it is generally known
that Case will open the Michigan sched
ule at Ann Arbor, October 3, a* that
Vanderbilt will follow the Ohioans on
October 10. The Wolverines will prob-
ably play at Lansing October 17, and
at SyracuseOctober 24. Though efforts
were made to induce the Methodists to
journey to Ann Arbor,the Orange man-
agement was reluctant to do so under
the agreement, and Michigan will un-
doubtedly play in the Salt city.
The Maize and Blue game with lar-
yard at Cambridge October 31 is an
assured fact, but the exact status of
the Pennsylvania and Cornell playing
arrangements is problenatical. It 4
believed that Penn will be induced to
play at Ann Arbor November 7. The
Cornell game was tentatively arrang
ed for November 14 at Ann Arbor, bu
inasmuch as playing Penn and Cor
nell on successive Saturdays at the
end of the season would give Michigar
two big home games in 1914, and jeep
ardize the 1915 schedule, it is no
known what arrangements will b
made. In other words, if Penn come;
to Ann Arbor, and relieves Michigan o
playing two hard games "on the road,.
it is a question whether Cornell wil.
be played at Ann Arbor cr Ithaca.
A rumyor to t"hn ffpn tbth F t-H

Join this discriminating class by
always serving our high qually
ICE CREAMS AND PUNCHES

MAIN STREET

MANY PHASES IN CAREER OF OLD
PRESIDENT.
(Continued from page 1.)
he managed throughout the Civil war.
lie desired to follow journalism, but
being unable to purchase the paper,
decided to accept a call to the presi-
dency of Vermont University. His
work here for three years was of the
standard to warrant the regents of the
University of Michigan asking him to
accept the presidency of the midwest-
ern school in 1869. He refused this of-
fer, as he wished to complete work
which he had started at Vermont, but
a second call in 1871 was strongly ur;-
ed upon him, and he accepted.
Dr. Angell began active work in Au-
gust of that year, and immediately
won the popular approval of the stu-
dents, and the people throughout the
state. For 38 years he was the helms--
man of the destinies of the university
i nterrupted only by his diplomatic ser-
vice.
His first diplomatic service was in
1880 when, as minister to China, he
negotiated two treaties relating to im-
migration and commerce, between the
United States and China. His services
were so effective that he was sent as
minister plenipotentiary on the com-
mission which made the. North Atlan-
tic Fisheries treaties with Great Brit-
Ain in 1877. He was chairman of the
dleep waterways commission in 1895-
and acted as minister to Turkey the
following two years when rel:tions ir
!he Ottoman empire were tense.
His scholarship has been universal-
.y recognized. No less than eigh'
schools have presen-e: him with th
LL.D. degree: Prown, Columbia, Rut
;ers, Princeton, Yale, John lhpkins
Wisconsin and liar, ard. IHe also is <
member of the Amerian Phicsophica
oetyof Philade phi, the American
ntiquarian Scciey i' Worcester, the
American Aca eay of Arts and Sl-
nmee, of Boston, and the American
istcr al assceiaten, o: wh:cb. he wa.
-:resident in 1893. Dr. Ang;ell wasmbn
harter member Cf the Ani en Acad-
erny at Rome, and of the society of In
ternational Law. He was a corres-
:onding member of the M sachusetts
:listorical society, and of ho Colonial
society of Massachusetts. He served
fcr many years as a regent of the
Smithsonian Institute of Washington.
His resignation as president was
tendered the regents in June 1905, but
was not acknowledged, so Dr. Angell
acted as pilot until June 1909, when
his resignatin was finally accepted,
and the honorary degree of President-
Emeritus conferred upon him. At this
time the Emperor of Japan decorated
him with. the Imperial Order of the
Sacred Treasure, a signal acknowl-
edgement of respect and admiration..
He has taken a great interest in
journalistic activities, and is an hon-
orary member of Sigma Delta'Chi, na-
.ional journalistic fraternity. His
leaning toward religion is strongbeing
a stalwart Congregationalist; and his
magazine writings typify him as a real
builder of democracy. And he is still
at it.

A gift of $10,000 was accepted by
the regents' at their meeting Decem-
ber 19, 1913, to establish a fellowship
in the graduate school that is open to
any student. The gift was made by
Mrs. E. L. Braun, of Toledo, in mem-
ory of her son Carl Braun. The sum-
mer school budget was passed, and
provision made for free wvater analy-
sis at the university for the entire.
state.
Former Student is Active on Stage.
Edward Moseman, '14, formeriy act-
ive in Michigan theatricals, is taki g
leading parts in a series of classical
productions being given this winter at
the Little Theater, Chicao. The Li-
tle Theater, situated on the fourth
floor of the Fine Arts luilding, is the
smallest playhouse in the world,
New ornet Is Discovered by Vraduat(
P. T. Delavan., '13, at the La Plata
observatory, in South America, has
discovered his second comet within
three months. The comet will b_,
known as "Comet Delavan." There is
some doubt as to its fumure, as the
body is believed to be moving awm
from the earth. Delavan is workin,;
with Prof. W. J. Hussy.
To Honor Former President by Reh i
A formal dedication of the bronze
relief of Ex-Pres. H. D. Tappan, will
be held during commencement wcee
next June. This relief will resenle
the bronze portrait of President-Emer-
itus Angell, in Memorial hail. The
relief of Ex-President Tappan was gi
en to the university 1,y a number of h's
former students, who by subscriptien
raised more than $6 ,20. the price o
the portrait. The same artist, Karl
Bitter, of New York, who designed
Doctor AngeWs relief, was the arst
for the new bronze por rait. .
AGED PRESIDENT-EMERITUS
EXTOLLED BY PROF. WENLEY
(Continued from page 1.)
membrance of it fresh till your lives'
end. Especially reflect that, after all
is said and done, human eminence
roots in character, in something infin-
itely beyond our poor persons, in
something, however, whereof a great
man is the vehicle, the foretaste, the
present manifestation. The world,
drab enough otherwise, is a proud
place because, now and then, men of
Dr. Angell's quality relieve its com-
mon clay, and evidence the victory of
the inner spirit over dull, leaden cir-
cumstance, by casting a bright beam
along the more excellent way. For, the
most inspiring thing given us to know
is the fine extract of human wisdom,
purified by old age."
R. M. WENLEY.

a

eRoasters and

Wholesale Grocers

Co.

Ltd., 2-14 S. MainaSt.

iguyL. Wooolk
exhibiting a full line of Imported. and
lic Novelties suitable for Christmas Gaits
te shop of A. Starr Best.
bit Shop at 326 S. State Street

paper December 28 on "Vowel Alliter- ;" W L 1iC1[ rLr
ation in '.Modern Poe~ry" befor the.had agreed to play at Ann Arbor ii
Modern Language association at its 1916, i fihigan's game at Cambrid;
annual convention. Eight other pro-- in 1914 and 1915 were satisfaetor
fessors representing Michigan attend- has gained considerable circulation iL
ed the convention. metropolitan newspapers. This repor
e is denied with emphasis by the Michi
MANEgan athletic authorities who have n(
MANY PROFESSORS WERE ('LC-
E USdefinite announcement to make rela-
LEAGUES. tive to the Michigan-Harvard relation-
(Continued from page 1.) shTin
member of the faculty in 1886. He Trainer Steve Farrell has had a pe-
continued in service as professor of nod of idleness during the holidays
as few track aspirantsreandr
physics until 1909, when he was re- As Ab tra in remained it
tired as Professor-Emeritus of phys- Ann Arbor to traim. The track tutor
ics. Ile is a member of the American expects to have his men out in a few-
Stiety, American Institute of Eec- days, however, and it is believed tha
SocityAmeica Intitte f Eec-Varsity prospects will form the chie'
trical Engineering, and is the author object ostec iterest.
of many textbooks on physics. objeCt of athletic s terest.
- Bradley Martin Thompson was ap- Class basketball is also expected.te
^ommand much interest, and inasmuch
pointed to the law faculty in 1887, a m
a lecturer on real property, and wa as the championships this year wilt
made Professor of Law in 1888. He be played under the same arrangemen
was retired in 1911 as Professor-Emer- as the inter-class football champion-
ship matches, it is believed that a fas
itus of. Law.''series of games will be staged in Wat-

(.
r
i
r.
r
S'
r
G
h
f
f

LET THE
ESH MAN

Press Your Clothes

Have you noticed
the distinguished appearance
a perfect fitting

I

HAND PRESSING
Be irsning Dec. 8th
SUITS 25c TROUSERS 10c

Dress Suit

I

gives one ? This is the only
kind we make..
Our fabrics are the newest.
WAGNER & CO.
Tailors State Street

erman gymnasium. As yet no defnite
plans have been arranged for the prac-
tice of the various class teams. -
Gym Classs For lien Will Start Today
Regular gymnasium classes for men
start Thursday morning with the 11:00
o'clock section. The 200 new lockers
are installed and ready for use. These
lockers are of the most recent design,
and are an improvement on the old
style from the standpoint of both hy-
giene and convenience.
KGA I RICK THEA1TRF
Detroit, Michigan
CEO. SCARBOR-
OUGH'S SENSA-
TIONAL. DRAMA THELURE

C. I. KID'17 Lit.

1%J

1112 S. University Ave.

I

All garments made
shop.

in our own

COMEDY CLUB SHOW POSTPONED
Conflict With Northwestern Debate
Makes Date Uncertain,.
Owing to a conflicting date with the
Northwestern debate on January 16,
the management of the Comedy club
has been again forced to postpone the
date set for the production of the
"Scarecrow."
It was thought before vacation that
some mutual, agreement could be
reached whereby both affairs could be
held upon the same night, but it is now
definitely known that the negotiations
have fallen through. Up to last night
no further date had been decided upon.
Present indicationsdpoint to the fact
that the followinig day, January 17,
will be chosen. This is the second
time the club has been forced to post-
pone its date this year. The first
change was only obtained after much
difficulty, for permission had to be ob-
tained from New York to shift the
date of one of the Klaw and Erlanger
productions scheduled at the Whitney
for January 16..

um

Temple
heatr e
The Favorite "Mov-
ie" Playhouse
Wednesday, Jan. 7

The Sea

I

art the New Year Right

If You FREIGH
Expect
PHONE US AND SAVE TROUBLE
Co E. GODFRIEY, 410 N. Fourth Ave. Phone 82-L

Eterna l
2 Reel Lubin Feature Film
HIS NEPHEW'S SCHEME
And Anether Reel
Three Reels of Pictures
Every Day
ADMISSION - - 10C

Buy your supplies at

IE UNIVERSITY AVENUE PHARMACY
COULDINC & WIKEL
1219 S. U. Ave.-
ugs, Soaps, Toilet Articles, Candy, Cigars,

III

D a

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Coliseum

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In Old Armory
OPEN EVERY AFTERNOON AND EVENINC

For Novelties
VISIT
The Exquisite Corset Shop
Bertha Noll 304 South Main st. :Marie Walker

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and Cigarettes.

Two Special Sessions every Wednesday and Sat-
urday morning, 9:30 to 11:30, Special
Crand March
Wed.evening, Jan.14 a Carnation March

:0

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US 4169

WE INSIST ON SATISFYING

PACKARD ACADEMY
Prof. Scott, official instructor for the State Normal and
leges, with his staff of lady assistants will instruct all
prope dancing. Private lessons by-appoirtment. Pho

ary Col-
sses in
'm* - a

..e

i

4

d " /n _ . Alp" Cats." I" "l ama iwo

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