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October 05, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



Several Michigan men took advnm
tage of the summer vacation to visit
foreign countries. Ralph Snyder,
'14L, who with Russel Judson, '14,
toured England and the Continent,
said last night:
"By taking advantage of cheap tick-
ets and using passes, we were able to
make the trip for $150 apiece. Going
over we passed a huge ice-berg within
a few miles of where the Titantic dis-
aster occurred. We visited Belgiuin,
Holland, Germany, France, England,
and Ireland, meeting several Michigan
men abroad, and we found our Union
pins of great assistance in making

acquaintances. At a dance in Paris
we met Jim Watkins, and had quite a
reunion, until the entrance of Jack
Johnson broke it up. At the Louvre
we saw Professor Pillsbury and Mrs.
Pillsbury." Snyder and Judson also
inet Wn. Allard, 'ilL, and Hl. Clark,
17M.
Claire Straith, '17M, who went
across the ocean in a cattle boat re-
ports a fine time in England, Belgium,
and France. In Paris he met Coach
Yost. Straith estimated the cost of
the trip as less than $125.
Frazer Clark, '15, also was abroad
and saw Jim Watkins and Earl Moore
in Paris. All the men who went
abroad were enthusiastic about their
experiences and think that more Mich-
igan students should spend their sum-
iners in this way,

Vest Pocket Note Books
%tvidaents Ca n't, Affa rd to he Wilhoxat Thern

A Genuine
Flexible
Leather
Cover
Three pads 50 .
sheets each, size
2 x4 complete.
25c

,
,
I
k.r
,,

A VEST POCKET
memorandum with
removable pads and
perforated sheets.
When a pad is used
up insert another.
You pay for one
cover only, the cost
of extra pads is tri-
vial.

I

THE MAVER-SCHAIRER
STATIONIERS-PRINTERS-BINDERS-STUDEiNTS' SUPPLIES-112

CO
S. MAIN ST.

m - srrr~ ..e9.-e,.. - -- - Vim ;- sr ,t c 1E

BOARD IN CONTROL
TO CONSIDER BAND
The fate of the University band will
be settled at the meeting of the Board
in Control of Athletics which will be
held on the eleventh of this month.
As things stand now the band is hold-
ing out for partial scholarships for
the different members, or a money
payment for part of their tuition from
the athletic association. The student
subscription taken up in former years
have generally proved unsuccessful,
and the board of regents, not wish-
ing to create any precedents, has re-
fused to take any action on the mat-
ten '.
The band which will attend the Case
game will not be the regular Varsity
band of former years, but will consist
of musicians paid for this special
occasion.
According to Ike Fisher there is
fine material in the University at the
present time' for a band of twenty
pieces, which is the maximum number
that partial scholarships are now de-
sired for.
SWMA DELTAPSIMIGHT
PLACE NEW CHAPTER HERE.
Sigma Delta Psi, an athletic fra-
ternity established at Indiana in 1912,
is anxious to establish a chapter at
Michigan.
The athletic association is in re-
ceipt of a communication from the
central board of the fraternity, en-
closing the constitution, and asking
that the matter be placed before the
student body. If Michigan' athletes
are interested, it is asked that a rep-
resentative be sent to a meeting at
Indianapolis to be held during the
Christmas vacation.
Athletes who wish to become mem-
bers of the fraternity must compete in
live athletic events and do better than
certain established marks in each.
The requirements include running the
hundred yard dash in 11 3-5 seconds,
negotiating the 120-yard high hurdles
in. 20 seconds, high jumping 5 feet,
broad jumping 18 feet and putting the
16 pound hammer 30 feet.
Professor A. S. Whitney, Director
Bartelme and Director Rowe all speak
well of the idea and will give the mat-
ter consideration.
HE ALTH SERVICE Tro PROBE
ROBT. UDY'S RECEN T DE ATH
As a result of the death of Robert
Udy, '17, of Bluefield, W., Va., who died
Wednesday morning from blood pois-
oning contracted in a barber shop in
Bluefield, the University Health Ser-
vice officials will correspond with the
health officer of Bluefield and explain
the nature of his death. By thus
bringing to light the unsanitary con-
dition of the barber shop in which
Udy contracted the disease, the Uni-
versity Health Service aims to extend
its usefulness beyond the city of Ann
Arbor.
Lockers to be Sold for Fall Season.
As soon as the Varsity football, ten-
nis and track men are taken care of,
lockers at the Ferry field house can
be secured for the fall season ending
November 15, at $1.00 each.
The new club house when completed
will have free lockers' and cold show-
ers for all.

STUIDENTS DRAFT DE LUXE
MAP FOR BUSINESS MEN.
The enterprise of a couple of Mich-
igan students has resulted in the
publication of a de luxe map of Ann
Arbor, for the use' of business men.
About fifty of thes* maps were put
out during the summer,-wholly the
work of James Hurley and John P.
Parsons, late of the literary depart-
ment, now freshman medics. The
map gives the number of all lots and
additions, and the owners of all as
yet unplatted, including several out-
side the city. While the printing is
not all that was desired, the work is
well executed; and the authors con-
template extending their idea to other
towns in this vicinity. A zinc etching,
reduced, is now being prepared for
the exclusive use of real estate men.

FORESTRY DEPARTMENT TO
STRENG THEN CURRICULUM,
Six new courses have been added
to the forestry department this year.
Course 3 in identification of woods and
Course 23 in forest protection are
merely enlargements of similar work
done last year. However, the courses
in woodlots and forest parks, forest
improvements, silvicultural practice
in the Lodgepole and the Douglas Fir
types, Forestry for civil engineers,
and forestry for teachers are new this
year, and with the new facilities for
thorough instruction, both in the lab-
oratory and in the field the depart-
ment is holding its own, if not sur-
passing such standard forest schools,
as the Biltmore, and Yale.

Wednesday, October 8

Matinee and Night

1.

Return Engagement of the Magnificent Spectacular Drama
Presented by the Original and Only Company Appearing in This Great
Romance of Early Rome

Whitney

Theatre

TO RUN CLASS RELAYS THIS FAL
Events to be Staged Between Halve
of Some Football Gamne.
The inter-class relay race betwee
four teams-the all-seniors, alt jur
iors, all-sophomores, and all-frest
men-will be featured between th
halves of one of Michigan's home foot
ball games, as 'last year. Directc
Rowe stated yesterday that plans fo
the holding of the fall race were a
ready worked out, and that the me
who wish to participate in the race
should begin their training immediate
ly. The only restriction is that win
ners of track "M's" shall be barre
from competition.
Director Rowe will consult any me
wishing to begin running this fall a
his regular office hours.

'TH E
SMOOTH EST

GORGEOUSLY

MASSIVE
SCENIC

A GUARANTEE OF MERIT
So absolutely certain is the management of The Light Eternal
of its power to please all classes that this guarantee of merit is
given. Any patron not thoroughly satisfied may "have the pur-
chase price of tickets refunded on application,at the box office
during the performance or after the final curtain. Refund will be
made cheerfully and no questions asked.

LAVISH
COSTUMING
BEAUTIFUL
EFFECTS

VERY freshman wants to start right.
E Put hire next to Velvet-the college
smoke. It's the real, time-Inatured
tobacco with a smooth,
delightful flavor - a
taste that never palls
on you-doesn't bum
hot.
Velvet is superb tobacco-
aged two years-an ideal
smoke. Today-tomorow
-whlenever you do smoke
it, tha day will bring you
a new version of pipe pleas-
ure. You will become a
Velvetarian. Just keep it
in mind. At all dealers.

EQUIPMENT

(. Y

Conceded by all Authorities to be THE GREATEST DEVOTIONAL DRAMA OF ALL TIME; A MASTERPIECE IN STAGECRAFT

11

What the Critics Say
(The following excerpts are taken from
reviews of "The Light Eternal" as present-
ed by the identical company to be seen
here.)
"Of powerful influence and elevating
nature."-Chicago American.
"A splendidly impressive play."-St.
Louis Globe Democrat.
"No offering of the season so well re-
ceived."-Cincinnati Times-Star.
"A thrilling, moving. inspiring draina."
-Cleveland Plain Dealer.
"An impressive play and notable cast."-
Detroit journal.
"A masterpiece in stagecraft."-Milwau-
kee News,
"Br i lli ant and artistic."-Pittsburg
Leader.
"Thrilling, appealing and devout."-Phil-
adelphia Press.
Masterful and masterfully handled."-
Boston Globe.
"Forceful, fervent and cincere.-Toronto
World.

A Better Play Than Beng-Hur

11

(The following uusoliFited indorsement is of exceptional worth, coming as
it does from a world famous commentator on the religious drama. Rev. Hughes
is the author of'The Biblical Play" and "The Stage from a Clergyman's Stand-
point.")
MANAGERS '"THE LIGHT ETERNAL" CO., Majestic Theatre, New York City:
Gentlemen: I witnessed the excellent presentation of "The Light Aternal"
on Thursday night with great satisfaction and profit. When I compare it with the
religious plays I have already witnessed and criticised, notably "Ben-Hur," "Quo
Vadis," "The Shepherd King,"and "The Sign of the Cross,"y.i feel "The Light
Eternal" is to be preferred to any of them. There are in this play no scenes of revelry
so repulsive to the Christian mind, and which I so severely censured in "The Sign
of the Cross," although that play was endorsed by the Archbishop of Canterbury
and the late Mr. Gladstone. And yet "The Light Eternal" conveys the same teach-
ings and gives us a graphic delineation of the spirit of martyrdom which establish-
ed the Christian religion as a great historic fact before the days of Constantine.

11

V

0c

THOS. P. HUGHES; D. . L. D.

New York City, Dec. 14, 1908.

I

Full two ounce tins

"The Light Eternal" was presented at the Whitney Theater, Ann Arbor, on April 19 and 20,
1911, and again on Feb. 5th, 1912, by the same cast to be seen here Wednesday. This
attraction merits the support of every theatre goer and church member of Ann Arbor.
PRICES: MATINEE 50c-25c; NIGHT $1.0O-75c-50c-25c

11

l T

Ih

11

EAITHEATRE, EES
WIHITNEY TETE IH ATURDAY,

OCT. 11

THE SVCCESS

OF THE CENTVRY

WILLIAM A. BRADY'S Production of Louisa M. Alcott's
Imrmnortal Story.

LITTLE

wo

Et

Dramatized By Marian de Forest

By Arrangement with Jste Bowstelle

MEG, JO, BETH AND AMY STEP
ALIVE OUT OF 'BOOK

Direct from . Six Months' tun i.t the Playhouse, New York

11

NIGHT: $1.50, $1.00, 75c 50c
P RIA E S MATINEE: $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c

MAIL ORDERS Seat Sale Ope
NOW THURS., 10 A.

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