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December 18, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TI{URSDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

....
a .

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Christmas Celebration at Union, 7:30
o'clock.

"

RULES PASSED
FOR SAR IN
STUETHELP

PI"EACE CONTEST
SCHEDULED TO
OCCUR TONIGHT

ed

Peace Oratorical Contest, University
hall And~orium, 8:00 o'clock.
Junior Engineering Party at Barboir
Gymnasium, 8:00 o'clock.
Faculty Concert at School of [1usic,
8:00 o'clock.
Gargoyle on Sale.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Y. M. C. A. Ti ncheon at Union, 12:00
o'clock,
Y. il. C. A. Luncheon to Foreign Stu-

Working
IUp

. '; i tio n s to Ciii? rn
w~iIy~ n

. i (.

i n Selected i Preliminaries,
Wil Strkie to Represent the
'n vtrsity, March 2,
i Stan c'oitest,

BASETBLLENTHUSIASTS
TO PLAY DURING HOL"DAYS
During the Christmas holidays, Wat-
erman gymnasium will be open from
10:00 to 12:00 o'clock every morning
for the use of any students who desire
to play basketball.
Mfore than 30 men have already sit-
nified an intention to avail themselves
of this chance at extra practice. Di-
rector Rowe requests that any others
who are interested call either at
his office, or at the gymnasium.
After a few days practice the men
will be divided up into teams and reg-
ular games will be played each morn-
ing.
Holiday Meetings to Cheer the Lonely
Open-house will prevail every week-
day night at Newberry hall, during
Christmas holidays. The lonely ones
will be cheered by a varied program
including music, readings, and games.

'['I !~E EA ~Tf~i~Y LANSMEE

s a poly-
tment of
and as a
76, was
study of

Negotiations Will Be Begun,
V w O c doaring Away
Few t)bjeciions.

Wil.,

I

dents at
o'clock

Newberry

maii, . # 2:v I

Illinois Club Leaves in1
1:1 o'clock.

Special Car atI

on this side of the Atlantic, and nas
since that time been a factor of na-
tion-wide importance in the develop-
ment which has replaced the old-time
apprentice method for pharmacists
with a four-year scientific course.
The part that Michigan has taken in
the rapid rise of pharmacy from a
trade to a science may be indicated by
the single significant fact that gradu-
ates of Michigan are at the heads of
12 of the 79 pharmaceutical schools in
the country. They are Emerson R.
Miller, '92P, Alabama Polyte:-hnic In-
stitute; Homer C. Washburn, '02P,
Mercer University; Charles B. Jordan,
'10P, Purdue University; Charles C.
Sherrard, '90P, Tri-State College of
Pharmacy; Arthur W. Linton, '09, Val-
pariso University; Wilbur J. Teeters,
'95P, University of Iowa; Wilbur R.
Jackman, '86-'87P, University of
Maine; Earnest R. Crandall, '11P,Kan-
sas City College of Pharmacy; Charles
H. Stocking, '07P, University of Okla-
homa; Charles O. Hill, '93P, Univer-
sity of Tennessee; Charles W. John-
son, '96P, University of Washington;
Rafael del Valle, '01P, College of Phar-
macy, San Juan, Porto Rico.
When the federal Food nd Drugs act
became effective a demand for compe-
tent pharmaceutical chemists to serve
as inspectors and analysists in the va-
rious government laboratories+
throughout the country was suddenly
created. It is a matter of history that
Michigan's school of pharmacy con-
tributed more men to this service than
any other school or university in the
country. This is explained by the fact
that from the first it has steadily raised
its standard to that of the other tech-
nical departments, instead of remain-
ing as at first a two-year course, with-
out the collateral work which is nec-
esary to make any professional career
effective, as mathematics, general sci-
ence, and modern languages for pur-
poses of research.
Not leasL among Michigan's well-
known graduates, have been the men
who have spent their later years a!
work in the school of pharmacy fromn
which some of them received their un-
dergraduate degrees. Chief among1
these is Albert B. Prescott, '64M, who
became professor in pharmacy in 1865,
and was dean of the ?epartment from
the time of its founding in 1376 until
his death in 1905. Dr. Prescott served
through the civil war, in the cspital
service, and was retired with the ranil
of captain, coming directly from the
south to take up his work in the uni-
versity.
Through the efforts of Dr. Prescott
the stendard of the school was con-
stantly raised by increasing the length
of the term and the variety of the
curriculun:, so that Michiean might1
keep up with the insistent demand for
better, and still better, men in the+
pharmaceutical field.
Upon the death of Doan Prescott in
1905 he was succeeded by his own pu-
(Continued on page 4.)

DISTINCTIVE CANE
FAVORED. BY"LAWS
Seniors Will Carry Sticks Similar to
1913 Choice, to Institule
Departmental Cane.
COM3IITTEE APPOINTMENTS MADE
With the idea of carrying out the
plan of the 1913 law class, the senior
laws have decided to adopt a class
cane similar to the stick of last year's
class. The purpose of the plan of
having the same stick every year, is to
establish the custom in the law depart-
ment, of carrying a cane which will
be distinctive of the department, for
all time. This action is contrary to
the attitude of the senior lit class,
which favors one style of cane for all
departments.
The following committee appoint-
ments have been announced by Robert
1. Curry, class president:
Auditing-V. W. Main, chairman, M.
T, Davis and M. H. Tinkham.
Finance-J. R. Ober, chairman and
G. E. Matthews.
Banquet-H. J. Plunkett, chairman,
I. L. Wilson, F. H. Dye, J. V. Lewis, R.
C. McLaughlin and F. C. Houston.
Cap and Gown-E. M. Sharpe, chair-
man, C. B. Hughes, C. C. Murrah, H. C.
Meyers and Wm. Percy.
Class Day-F. C. Houston, chairman,
S. E. Gifford, C. J. Goodrich, A. H.
Kinch and M. IH. Pontius.
Lansing-C. O. Olivier, chairman, IZ.
P. Davis, P. L. Potter, R. S. Day and'
C. W. Kingston.
Invitation-F. T. Findlay, chairman,
1., S. Hulbert, W. M. Laird, S. S. Gros-
'er and D. B. Maloney.
Memorials-S. W. O'Br'en, chair-
mn, J. W. Cory, J. R. Lackey, G. C.
7rismore and C. Weintraub.
Musical-C._ . Quaintance, chair-
nan, E. G. Kemp, H. K. Curtis, J. W.
Fowler, R. W. Fixel and T. E. H. Black.
Picture-J. A. McNeil, chairman, F.
M. Cook, S. B. Atwood, J. P. Harris and
0 T. Olds.
Pipe and Stein-F, M. Phinney,
shairman, W. A. Diemer, J. H. Jay, R.
Al. Pierson and T. G. Forney.
Promenade-T. F. McCoy, chairman,
A. F. Lamey, L. D. David, P. L. Lan-
dis and W. J. Wannemacher.
Reception-F. L. Stephan, chairman,
B. B. Shimmel, H. W. Lippincott, C. E.
'lement and M. L. Toulme.
Souvenir-J. P. O'Hara, chairman,
I. P. Blakeney, C. E. Zachman, R. T.
Gust and W. E. Dudgeon.
Washington's Birthday-R. M. Sny-a
der, chairman, H. A. Peterson, R. H. C.
Proffit, D. T. Melhorn and L. P. Haller.
Social-L. K. Wood, chairman, J. T.
Witherow, S. W. Symons, J. B. Helm
:md C. H. Hippler.;

* I. "A student is not expected *
* to-give more than three hours *
* a day, and not lss than two and *
* a half hours, for the three meals *
* obtained."
* II. "Workinj students should *
* be given the sanmo :o r as the *
* regular boarders, and as clean *
* places to eat in as regular din-
* ing rooms." *
* III. "Wo r k i n g students
* should pay foe dshes brohen*
* when violating definite instruc- *
* tions." *
* IV. "Working students *
* should not be disharged with-
* out at least a week's notice, un- *
* less for disobedience and dis- *
* honesty."
V. "The committee would .*
* recommend that the working *
* students be required to take a h
* physical examination before
* they are given employment."
* * * * * * * .* *. * *
Above are the res olutions passed by
the working students' coa mnitiee at its
meeting Tuesday night, to govern the
relations existing between boarding
house waitcrs and proprietor. The
rules were drawn up from the basis cf
the questionaire prepared by the com-
mittee and sent to the boarding ho s
employers and employees. More thn
100 responded to the call.
Investigation by the committee
shows that the sanitary conditions in
(Continued on page 4.)
"C-C" MEN ELECT
OFFICERS FOR 191I
Cross country men closed their ac-
tivities for the year, by the electien of
officers at a meeting at Waterman gym-
nasium yesterday afternoon.
The following were chosen:
President, F. L. Young, '14-'16L;
secretary, F. L. Walters, '16; captain,
T. C. Trelfa, '16E; members board in
control, G. B. Fox, '16; George Watt,
'17M; H. L. Carroll, '17E, and L. F.
Terry, '15E.
The only man lost by the club this
year is Captain H. E. Brown, '14. The
club tendered both the retiring captain
and Intramural Director Floyd A.
Rowe votes of thanks for their work
for the organization this year.
It was mainly through the efforts of
Director Rowe that the eastern trip
for the cross country team was made
possible this year. While the showing
in the eastern intercollegiate was not
all that it might have been, the mem-
bers of the club feel that a move in
the right direction was made.
Fresh Engineers Organizing Glee Club
A glee club of 18 members is being
organized by the freshman engineerin
class, as an outgrowth of the singing
at recent class dinners and smokers.
The club will be under the direction
of Kenneth Westerman, '14, of the
school of music faculty. .

ALLAN i. FRAZER OF DETROIT
ILL RE PRESIDING OFFICER
ud , 1 equested to B S3ated
Fii:iJ I1]t4 Befux'e 'S:00
O'elack.
The annual Peace cratorical contest
final, in which Mich gan's representa-
tive is selected for the state, and if
successful, to ihe inter-state and na-
tional Peace contests, will b held at
::0? o'clock tonight ir University Hall
auditorium-,under the auspices of the
Oratorical association. The au:ience is
urged to be seated by five minutes to
8:00 o'clcck, as no one'will be allowed
to enter after 8:0' o'clock, except be-
ftweer. speeches.
The five ora.tcrs selected for this
contest in the recent preliminaries,
end their orations are as follows: J.
W. Harding, '14L, "The Price of Peace
From the American Standpoint"; W.K
E. Morris, '12-'14L, "The Price of
Peace"; H. C. Talhnalgu, '14, "The
Passing of the Soldier"; C. 0. Chan
'15. "The Unity of the World"; N. .,
Goldstick, '15L, "The World Crisis."
Each of the orators has worked hard to
prepare for the contest, so that close
competition is expected in this final.
Speeches are limited to sixteen min-
utes.
Allan H. Frazer, a prominent De-
troit lawyer who was special prosecu-
tor in the alderanic graft cases, and
special council for the city in the re-
cent street car preblein aeitation, will
preside. Six judges who will deter-
uin: the winner ar : Professcrs E. A.:
Lyman and J. S. Lathers, of the State
Nornmal school at Ypsilanti; and Pro-
fessors A. H. Lloyd, J. L. Markley, and
S. F. Gingerich and W. A. Frayer from
(Continued on page 4.)
FREE PARTY BILLED
T UNION TONIGHT
All union mem ers are expected to
attend the big Christmas party and
minstrel show tonight. If the crowd is
large enough, the minstrel men will
give two performances, the first to be-
gin shortly after 7:30 o'clock. The af-
fair is absolutely free and is the first
of its kind the Union has ever attempt-
ed. Cyril Quinn, '14, chairman of the
committee in charge, promises those
who attend, a novel program and a
gene 2ral good time.
Bernus Kline, '14, as interlocutor
will start things among his black fac-
>d artists on the ends, Waldo Fellows,
'14, Cordon Eldredge, '14, S. L. Adels-
dorf, '14L, and Lyle Clift, '16L. They
will be assisted by eight other popular
entertairers, who will likewise be
adrned in minstrel style. Each rman
will give his own special "stunt," the
"gold tooth" quartet will render sev-
eral selections, and there will be two
or three ensemble numbers.
Rowland Fixel, '14L, has written a
special piece for the occasion, called
the "Saxophone Rag," and Eldredge
and Fellows, have worked up a medley
of popular Michigan songs for the
finale.
According to "Denny" the refresh-
ments will be the best ever. The
building will be bedecked with appro-
priate Christmas decorations.

The attendance at the
averaged 100.

affairs last yearI

WOMEN TO FORM
DRAMATIC SOCIETY
"W omen's lDraiatle Association" Asks
Non-Athletic Board For
Recognition.
TO GIVE PLAY NEXT SEMESTER
A new dramatic association, receiv-
ing its initial impetus through the ef-
forts of a group of older women in
the university, has petitioned the non-
athletic board of control for the rccog-
nition of its constitution.
The name of the organization is tc
be the Women's Dramatic Association
and its aim is to forward dramatic in-
terest among women students This
is an entirely new idea for women, anc.
its launching has been the result- of
careful and serious preparation.
An honorary circle of the organiza-
tion is to be established, called the
"Masque." Membership will be basee,
upon excellence in the work of the
dramatic association proper. This in-
ner circle will constitute the executivE
board of the organization, with th,
dean of women, and the president o.
the women's league, as honorary mem-
bers without the power of vote.
Charter members of the society are:
Mary Palmer, Louise Conklin, Emil3
Gilfillan, Isabelle Rizer, Marjorie Nich-
o'son, and Helen Brandebury.
A play will be given during the sec-
ond semester, tryouts for which wil
be held immediately after the firs:
official meeting of the new dramatic
association.
BASKETBALL MANAGERS PASS
RULES FOR CLASS CONTESTS
Managers of class basketball teams
adopted several novel rules at a meet-
ing at Waterman gymnasium yester-
day afternoon. The officials also ac-
cepted a trophy from Mr. Jackson
manager of the Ty Cobb Sporting
Goods store, of Detroit, to be awarder
to the winner of the campus series
which will be played following the
holidays.
According to the rules agreed tc
yesterday teams must appear on the
floor for regular games in distinctive
uniforms. The other rules concerned
eligibility, it begin decided that no can-
didates for the Varsity track team, or
any man who had been excused from
gymnasium work, might compete,
Board Refuses Claim of Assistant
The Ann Arbor board of education
has refused to pay to C. E. Wilson,
assistant instructor in the engineer-
. ing department, the sum of $37.5t;
which he claimed for past services.
Mr. Wilson was head of the manual
training courses in the high schoo?
last year.

MATERIAL FOR
1014 VARSITY
LOOKSSTRONG
In Spite of Loss of Six Stars, Roll of
Eligibles Gives Promise of
Good Wolverine
Eleven.
POSTER LISTS TWENTY MEN
FOR BACKFIELD POSITIONS
Scholastic Obstacles May Eliinate
Some, But Remainder Should
Prove Capable.
With a Harvard game practically ar-
ranged, and indications pointing to
one of the hardest football schedules
of recent years, Michigan students are
already beginning to size up prospects
for the 1914 season. In spite of the
oss of an even half dozen stars, in th-
persons of Craig, Pontius, Patersomi,
sorbet, Allmendinger, and Musser, a
consideration of the list of men who
ire expected to be eligible next season,
shows that the Wolverines will not be
:acking in material from which to
ick a capablo eleven.
A list of girdiron men who will form
:he nucleus from which Coach Yost
will make his selections for the 1914
Varsity has been compiled by Trainer
'Steve" Farrell. This list shows some
strong men, some players of lesser
,aliber and some men who will barely
pass muster, but on the whole the ros.-
er indicates that Michigan ought to
have a good team.
Trainer Farrell's list, however, can-
-tot account for men who will be lost
through scholastic ineligibility, or
:rom dropping out of college. Many of
he men may not be available for ex.t
year's eleven. But it is believed there
will be enough men left on the list to
show that the 1914 Varsity cannot bJN
considered a weak contender for hn-
ors.
The list follows:
Centers-Traphagen, Lichtner and
Nieman.
Linemen-Captain Raynsford, Coch'
Man, McHale, Rehor, Millard, Rhein-
:nan, Watson, Benton, Finkhelner, Cer-
aey, Skinner, Des Coudres, Dunne and
Y'Brien.
Ends-Lyons, James, Staatz, Huebel
and Graven.
Backs-Hughitt, Catlett, Galt, Bush-
aell, Maulbetsch, Benton,Splawn;Mead,
Rentley, Zieger, McNamara, Calvin,
Skinner, Quail, Roehm, Bastian, Cohn,
Davidson and Tuttle.
Discovered in class games-Lillie,
Payette, Peterson, Sharkey, McQueen
md Burton.
WORE THAN 60 WILL ATTEND
STUDENT VOLUNTEER MEETING
Final arrangments for the trip to the
international Student Volunteer con-
vention, at Kansas City, Mo., were
completed by the delegates at a meet-
ing in Newberry hall yesterday after-
noon. Michigan will be represented by
mnore than 60 persons. Both branches
of the Students' Christian association
are sending the quota allowed, and 15
Chinese students will be Included.
(03MITTEE DELAYS FINAL
DECISION ON OPERA MIJsC
The committee, consisting of Profes-
sors William Howland and A. A. St-
ley and Mr. Earl V. Moore, of ',e
school of music faculty which is to
pick the music for the Union opera,

met last night but did not come to a
final decision. They will not decide
for several days who the successful
,writers are, but will choose the pieces
so that the work of printing the score
may be started before Christmas.

- . -._

_ D_

||

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EAR KL
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