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December 17, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 191 PRIC

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hlool at

Rest

gan Daily For Michigan"
i 38 years of 't_ existence,
epairtment of the Universi-
an has sent into Hit world
sful dentists. There are
ons which account for this
ental department at Michi-
es the finest and most com-
museum in the world; it
tic which is second to none
ed states; no American
utistry has a better build-
acilities, a higher standard
ance and actual work. No
hool has a better faculty

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Senior Lit Dinner Dance at Union,6:00
o'clock.
Tan Beta Vl Dinner at Union, 6:00
o'clock.
Engineering Society Meeting, Room
>48, New Engineering Building.
Forestry Club Meeting, Room 407, New
Engineering Building.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Chrisfmas Celebration at Union, 7:30
o'clock.
Peace Oratorical Contest, University
Hall Auditorium, 8:00 o'clock."
,lrnior Engineering Party at Barbour-
Gymnasium, 8:00 o'clock.
Saloon Cases Will Be Tried Today
The cases against George Schaible
and Lawrence J. Dammr, the saloonists
charged with selling liquor to stu-
dents, which were to have come up for
trial in the circuit court yesterday
morning, were postponed, and will be
tried at 9:00 o'clock this morning.
TO DELIBERATE ON
SELF-RULE PLANS

SENIOR LITS VOTE
TO CARRY STICKS
The cane problem was disposed of
by the senior lits at their class meet-
ing yesterday, when a resolution fa-
voring the adoption of the custom, was
carried by a strong majority. The
pipe and cane committee was instruct-,
ed by the class to meet with represen-
tatives of the other senior classes, to
consider the feasibility of adopting an
all-senior cane
After hearing the report of the fin-
ance committee, the class vocel an as-
sessment of $2.00 on each member. A
motion iavoring the presentation of
numerals to the class football team,
for winning the departmental cham-
pionship, was lost, the class feeling
that such an action would be contrary
to the athletic association syste:n. The
picture committee was abolished on
the grounds that it now had no func-
tions to justify its existence.
The following committee appoint-
ments were announced:
Memorial: Lester Rosenbaum, chair-
man, Eric Kohler, Reuben Peterson.
Harold Tallmnadge, Alice Burridge. Ma-
leta Mcore and Jessic Cam-ron.
Pire and Cane: Cordon C. Eldredge,
chairman, Hiiugh Allerton, Felix Church
Gleed Miller and Rzoe:;ce Spencer.
S:n : Bruce Bromley, chairman.,
Kingsley Gould, Kenneth Westerman,
Lyle Clift, Roy Parsons and Homer
Shaffmastei.
Souvenir: Bruce Miles, chairman,
Charles Wattles, Myron Watkins, Emi-
ly Gilfillan and Frances Green.
Paul Blanshard was appointed
chairman of the cap and gown commit-
tee, but the rest of the committee has
not been selected.

NO-HOP EDICT MET
WITH RESIGNATION
The Senate's resolution to prohibit
a Junior Hop this year has met with
the regret, but with the resignation of
the student body. Those concerned in
the presentation of the petition have
expressed regret that the plan was not
given a trial.
It has been learned that the discus-
s:on of the hop in the Senate centered
around the idea that, if the students
involved had time to stop and consider
longer than they have, they would ap-
preciate morethoroughly the undesir-
able side of so big a thing as the Jun-
ior Hop. The general sentiment ex-
pressed by members of the Senate was
that the plans were painstaking, and
worked out in good faith, but they
were not considered, because it was
thought inadvisable to have a hop this
year.
Willis A. Diek,Ia, '14, chairman, of
the 1914 hop committee, which drew up
th' petition, made this statement. "I
am sorry that the Senate has decided
not to re-instate the Junior Hop. I
believe the hop that would have been
a credit to Michigan could have been
given this year. Although the univer-
sity has grown to such an extent that
a question has arisen as regards the
l racticability of having one large uni-
versity function of this kind, I should
have liked to have seen the new
.cchemO, as outlined in the committee's
petition, given a fair trial. However,
the action of the Senate is final, and
no doubt. based on good reasons. The
1914 committee will make no further
efforts to get another Junior Hop."

d-Mitchell dental musum was
;ift of the late Prof. Corydon
and Dr. William J. Mitchell,
rofessor :ord, although a
of anatomy, was greatly in-
in dentitry, and it was
his efforts that the dental col-
founded at the University of
. Dr. Mitchell, who studied
ofessor Ford, built up a com-
ve practice in London and ac-
considerable fortune. Diur-
ears of his active practice, he
his specimens of dental anat-
I on his retirement, he pre-
e entire collection to the Uni-
f Michigan. He also present-
is time, a large number of
British dental journals to the
tal library, which now con-
ost every known work on the
ience.
all of the dental work for
students of the university, is
the seniors of the dental
With a clientage of this type,
mands work of the highest
t exacting quality, the stu-
prepared for the best quali-
rk. During the past year,
parate operations were per-
y the students in the clinic,
.ndividual patients numbered
n 4,500. Thus, each student-
: an average of 230 individuals
s in his last preparatory year.
dental school in America
students as many hours of
ndamental work as does the
y of Michigan. More than
)rth of gold was used last
the dental department in its

01'1'N(' ANNOUNCES ITONQR ROLL
TChree Michigan PIlayers Gct Places
Onl Poster.

An open meeting of the Women's
self-government committee will be
held in conjunction with the class vice-
presidents, in harbour gymnasium at
4:00 o'clock this afternoon, to discuss
definite plans for the establishment of
self-government for the women of the
university-.
The committee which has been work-
ing in closed sessions since the first
of the semester, is ready to present
and receive suggestions for its fur-
ther proce lure. Tentative plans for
the organization are to have an equal
number of members from each class,
and a judiciary committee of three,
which will hear cases brought to it
through the executive committee, or
through individuals. According to the
present plans, the dean of women, and
the president of the women's league,
will sit upon the self-government
board, but without the power of vot-
ing.
Questions manifestly concerned with
self-government will be discussed by
the committee, and it will suggest the
possibility of bettering studying con-
ditions, and the use of books in the li-
brary.
No measures will be adopted until
they have been submitted in full to all
'>f the women, and approved by them.
A short mass meeting will be held
immediately after the Christmas vaca-
tion.

HOLIDAY
AND MI

Ht

Three Michigan players, Craig,
Hughitt and Paterson, are mentioned
on the Honor Roll or football men, se-
lected by Outing.
The plan of Outing is to choose for
the' Honor Roll men who have been se-
lected for national honors by two or
more coaches. Craig is placed on the
list of halfbacks, Hughitt fourth in the
list of quarterbacks, and Paterson
third in the roster of pivot men.
The entire Honor Roll will be pub-
lished in the January issue of Outing,
for which The Michigan Daily is In-
debted for the above information.
Gym Classes Adjourned Until Jan. 8
Regular gymnasium classes for men
will begin on Thursday, January 8.
The Thursday and Friday sections do
not meet this week, so the Monday and
Tuesday sections of the week follow-
ing the holidays will be excused to ev-
en up the work.
CRIMSON CONTEST
FAVORED BY YOST
NASHVILL[, TENN., Dec. 16.--
Though not conversant with the term
under which the Michigan-Harvarc
football game for next season has been
arranged, Coach Fielding H. Yost, of
the Wolverine eleven, has commented
favorably on the prospects of the
Maize and Blue meeting the Crimson
"Nothing could suit me better than
a schedule of two games with Harv-
ard, one to be played at Cambridge,and
one at Ann Arbor," declared Yost, ii
discussing the preliminary announce-
ment. "It would be a great game next
year, and closely contested.
"We had a good team during the past
season, one that would have fought
Harvard on equal terms, and I 'an'
looking for another good one nexi
year. Percy Haughton's team will alsc
show some improvement, according tc
all indications.
'We have always been willing tc
meet eastern teams, provided we car
get a return engagement, and I hope
such an arrangement can be made with
Harvard."
While Yost was not familiar with the
terms or date of the Harvard game.
cited as .disadvantageous from the
Michigan viewpoint by some of the
athletic authorities, it, is evident that
he regards the argument that Michi-
gan will have a green team next year
as invalid. He regards next year's
prospects with favor.
ADMINISTRATIVE BODY WILL
MEET WITH COS OPOLITANS

WILL BE

4,U1n ellbers1 M_ ay
Clumre to Christmnas
to lie Given 'roni

by

FIESI[ LITS INVITE OTHERS
TO "JOIN 'HOWIDY' MOVEMENT
To bring the entire freshman class
into the "howdy frosh" campaign, in-
augurated by fresh lits last week, at
a meeting yesterday afternoon the
class drew up invitations to be sent
to the other freshman classes on the
campus, inviting them to join in the
movement.
GYM REVEALS TWO
PERFECT FRESHMEN
There are two "perfect freshmen"
this year. Ralph S. Delbridge, of Jack-
son, Mich., and Cecil F. Cross, of
Wayne, Mich., have been selected from
the 911 first year men examined this
fall for compulsory gymnasium work,
as the best examples of physical ex-
cellence.
Although the gymnasium authorities
have selected the "perfect freshman"
each year, heretofore there has always
been one individual who stood above
his fellows. This year, however, two
men are so evenly matched that no
distinction could be made between
them. The two perfect men average
70 inches in height and 171 pounds in
weight.
MICHIGAN PLAYWRIGHTS NOT
ALLOWED TO ENTER CONTEST
Michigan will not be allowed to com-
pete in the prize play contest, in which
the management of the Princess thea-
ter of New York city offers $500 for
the best one-act play written by an
undergraduate of specified eastern in-
stitutions. Arthur Cohen, '14L, has re-
ceived this notification from the Prin-
cess management, having applied for
the admission of the university in the
contest. Another contest is to be held,
however, in which Michigan will'be al-
lowed to compete.

POPULAR EVENT WILL TAKE
PLACE OF REVUALAR CONCERT
Following the Senate council's re-
fusal to allow the J-Hop to be reinstat-
ed, the management of the glee and
mandolin club announced yesterday
that a popular concert, taking the
place of the usual J-Hop appearance,
will be held in the new Hill auditorium
about the middle of January.
TO CHOOSE OPERA
MELODIES TONIGHT
Music for the 1914 Union opera has
all been submitted, and the pieces will
be chosen at a meeting tonight by the
following committee: William How-
land, Prof. Albert Stanley and Mr.
Earl V. Moore of the school of music
faculty. Twenty-five selections were
handed in by nine students, and from
this number seven will be selected.
When the competition was opened
about a month ago, the seven lyrics
that had been written for the show,
were given out to the prospective writ-
ers, some of whom have put all of their
effort on a few pieces, while others
have worked on all of them. These
seven lyrics do not include the pre-
lude and finale, the music for which
is being written by Willis A. Diekema,
'1-4.
The committee will endeavor to
make the final choice tonight, and the
pieces selected will be sent immedi-
ately to Zimmermann and Co., music
publishers, of Cincinnati, who will get
out the score. The cover of this year's
score will be printed in three colors
and black. The nine competitors are
requested to meet at 7:15 o'clock to-
night, at the school of music, to play
their selections for the committee.
German Society Initiates 25 Members
Twenty-five new members were ini-
tiated at the general meeting of the

Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Harv-
ard are the only three schools in
America whose students may enter
British dental schools on their diplo-
ma, and receive a degree after one
year's work. Graduates of all other
American schools are compelled to
take examinations for entrance. Only
3.6 per cent of the Michigan graduates
have failed to pass their state board
examinations the first time, and in this
record Michigan stands above all oth-
er American schools and universities.
All students of the dental department
are compelled to study histolo y, and
bacteriology under such international-
ly famed teachers as Doctors Tuber
and Novy.
For the past five years, the dental
department has been compelled to re-
fuse admission to all but the highest
type of students. The increased fees
which are now the highest of any de-
partment of the University, had no ef-
feet whatever in cutting down the
number of applicants. An extra year

BURNT CORK SHOW PLANNED
AS PRINCIPAL ATTRAC2
Berius Kline to Be White Flani
Ii. terloentor; 1I1ll Have
Four End Men.
"Free," is the pass word to the
Christmas party and minstrel s
for Union members tomorrow ni
According to President Selden I
inson, '15L, it has always been the
bition of the Union officials to pre
some really big stunt such as ton
row night's celebration, with
charge.
The minstrels will form the b
ground for the rest of the celebra
Bernus E. Kline, '14, in white flan
and otherwise appropriately bedec
will be the interlocutor. His bl
faced supporters will include the
lowing popular campus entertain
Waldo Fellows, '14, Gordon Eldre
'14, S. L. Adelsdorf, '14L, Lyle (
'16L, J. Kingsley Gould, '14, Geo
McMahon, '16, Cecil Johnson, '141
0. Williams, '14E, L. J. Scanlan, '
J. H. Wilkins, '14, R. M. Parsons,
and A. S. Palmer, '16, the first
acting as end-inen.
Two pieces have been written e
cially for the occasion, the "Saxoph
Rag" and the finale. The "colo
gen e61-me --me 1-peiform as individ
in the roles for which they are alre
famous. The members of the "g
tooth" quartet will also get toge
for several numbers.
Holly and evergreen, will disp
the present decorations in the big h
and Christmas trees will be scatte
about the bunding. Something spe
in the line of refreshments is pro
ed.
NON-SENIORS MAY PROCURE
TICKETS TO DANCE TONI(
Tickets for the senior lit Christ
dinper-dance, to be held at the Ui
tonight, will be on sale at the Un
desk today. Several extra dance ti
ets will be sold to students, not mi
bers of thebclass,tat 75 cents.
dance will begin at 8:30 o'clock.
dinner, which is open only to seni
will begin at 6:30 o'clock. Tickets
the combined function are $1.25
those holding season tickets to
dinners, with an extra charge of
cents for others.
This will be the biggest senior p
ty previous to events at the end of
year. Some of the decorations for
Christmas celebration, to be 1
Thursday, will be up in time for
affair.

in the department of literature is be-
ing contemplated, both to raise the
standard, and to cut down entrance.
Mo transfer of students from other
universities is desired by the faculty,
ind only those who come with the
Iighest recommendations are accept-
Ad. More than 100 applicants, who de-
sired to take the last year of their
course at Michigan, after having pre-
pared at other schools, were refused
last year, and about six per cent of
the members of last year's freshman
class transferred to 'other colleges of
dentistry, that they might obtain a de-
gree of some sort.
Michigan's reputation in dentistry is
international. Michigan has more
graduates from her dental department
practicing in Germany than any other
American school; Michigan has more
graduates in the British posessions,
with the exception of Australia, than
any other American college of dentist-
^y. Michigan's American reputation in
dentistry is second to none.

Final arrangements for the Y. M. C.,
A. banquet, to be given in Newberry
hall at 12:00 o'clock Friday noon, to,
enable foreign students to meet the
university administrative body, have
been completed. President-emeritus
James B. Angell, Pres. Harry B.Hutch-
ins, Regent Junius E. Beal, John Bo-
nilla, '15M, and V. T. Maw, '14E, will
be the principal speakers. Paul Blan-
shard will act as toastmaster.
Eight members of the board of re-
gents, Secretary Shirley W. Smith,
Supt. Fred L. Keeler, and other prom-
inent faculty members and students
will be present. The whole number
of 164 foreign students have been in-
vited. Those intending to attend the
affair must mail the cards sent to them
to Edgar Crumpacker, '16E, before to-
morrow night.'
Deutscher Verein last night. Mrs.
Lydia H. Johnson, '14, was elected sec-
retary to fill the place vacated by Mil-
dred Nuchterlein, '15. Members-elect
who failed to attend the meeting will
be initiated at a later date.

I)IRECTORS ADVOCATE NEW
ORGANIZATION FOR TECHI
A report, advocating the radical
organization of the Engineering soc
ty and a change in the managem
and policy of the Technic, will be su
mitted by the board of directors at
meeting of the society to be held
5:00 o'clock this afternoon in roc
348 of the new engineering buildir
The publication of the Technic 1
been authorized by the advisory boa
but future plans of the editors depe
upon the result of this meeting.

________________________________________________________________________________________________ U U

I

FOOD

IS VP,

WE RAISE
YOU FIVE!

Gargoyle

Y'KNOW,
Food

AND THE

Number

OUT TOm

DAY.

So

Mxzst be gobbled up at 15c per gobble.

S E T

it

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