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December 14, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MESSAGE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1913.

PRICE FIVEC

LRD NEGOTIATES
ID FQOTDA LL GM

WALTER CAMP'S ALL-AMERICAN ELEVENS

First Eleven

Second Eleven

Third Eleven

CAMP GIVES CRAIG BERTH
FIRST ALL-AMERICAN EL

-

ng Michigan's
ast Night
at

MEETING
FOR STADIUM

I Steel Structure
Present Bleachers
of Wood.

Will

FRESH ARCHITECTS ORGANIZE
CLASS APART FROM ENGINEERS
With the election of officers Thurs-
day, the freshman architects organized
into a body separate from the remain-
der of the first year engineers. Here-
after the members of the class will write
"A" after their year number, instead
of the 'E" as the regular engineers do.
The following elections were made:
presidcnt, W. A. Bellows; vice-presi-
dent, C. Vanderhoof; secretary, L. T.
Ray; treasurer, Guy A. Bedell; foot-
ball manager, H. 1. Wilson; track
manager, J. U. Bosson; basketball man-
ager, A. Haskell; baseball manager, 1.
H. Waldo.
'M" CLUB W ILL
BE PERMANENT

End .......Hogsett, *Dartmouth Fritz, Cornell ..........Solon, Minnesota .
Tackle . . . .Ballin, Princeton .. . Butler, Wisconsin ......Halligan, Nebraska
Guard ....Pennock, Harvard .. Busch, Carlisle ........Munns, Cornell ..
Center ... .Des Jardien, Chicago Marting, Yale ..........Paterson, Michigan
Guard .....Brown, Navy........Ketcham, Yale ........Talman, Rutgers .
Tackle ....Talbot, Yale ....... Weyand, Army........Storer, Harvard ...
End ......Merrilat, Army .....Hardwick, Harvard .....Rockne, Notre Dam(
Quarter .. .Huntington, Colgate Wilson, Yale ..... .....Miller, Penn State .,
Half Back Craig, Michigan ...Spiegel, Wash. & Jeff....Baker, Princeton ..
Half Back Brickley, Harvard .. Guyon, Cirlisle .........Norgren, Chicago ...
Full Back .Mahan, Harvard .... Eichenlaub, Notre Dame.Whitney, Dartmouth
All-American Roster Contains
Seven Michigan Football Men.
Including his selections of this fall, 1 ed berths, due to their stellar work
Wlt t m hsc wa A ta.tofal of in the reat Minnesota game

i has made no final decision
the invitation of Harvard
to play a game of football,
Ige, October 24, 1914. Har-
tation was considered at a
the board in control of ath-
evening, but the only ac-
was the sending of a tele-
le Crimson athletic author-
:ontents of which were not

COSMOPOLITANS CHOOSE TWO
DELEGATES TO NATIONAL MEET
Fred B. Foulk, '13-'15L, and Juan A.
Bonilla, '15M,twere chosen delegates,
to represent the Michigan Cosmopoli-
tan club at the national convention of
the association of Cosmopolitan clubs
in North America, to be held at Iowa
City, Iowa, from December 26 to 29.
The names were recommended by the
board of directors of the club, and
were formally elected at the meeting
of the club Friday night.
By-laws were adopted at the meet-
ing; and Edward G. Kemp, '12-'14L,
and Charles S. Burt, from the Univer-
sity of Iowa, were admitted to mem-
bership.
SENTIMENT O
FACULTY PT
HOP IN DOUBT

dichigan made no def-
.e Harvard invitation,
at the athletic author-
avor on the prospects
he eastern institution,
test can be arranged
>e disadvantageous to
There seems to be
:tion over the date,,
s thwght that the tel-
to attempt to iron out

ORGANIZATION!

V a er Uaip na p ao ra, Ia a Ucv u,
21 positions on his annual All-Amer-
ican teams to Michigan players, since
his first selection in 1899. Of this num-
ber, seven have been chosen for the
first team, six for the second and eight
for the third.
"Willie" Heston was the first Mich-
igan player to make a place on one of
the eastern critic's teams. He was
chosen halfback on the third eleven
in 1901. Heston received the same
honor in 1902 and then came to the
front with a first team position in 1903
and 1904. Benbrook is the only other
Wolverine whowhas been honored by
a first eleven position two years in suc-
cession. Benbrook was chosen for
a guard in 1909 and 1910.
At no time, except in 1910 has Mich-
igan placed more than one man on the
first selection, but in that year, bothl
Benbrook and Wells landed the covet-t

gI 1Y.rta Y111"e.Ui s 1C.
Following is a list of all Michigan
players, who have ever been selected
by the dean of football for positions on
his mythical best elevens, and the
years in which they were chosen: 1901
-Heston, half, 3rd team; 1902-Hes-
ton, half, 3rd team; Sweeley, end, 2nd'
team; 1903-Heston, half, 1st team;
Redden, end, 3rd team; Maddoch, tack-
le, 3rd team; 1904-Heston, half, 1st
team; Curtiss, tackle, 2nd team; 1905
-Shulte, guard, 2nd team; Curtiss,
tackle, 2nd team;. Hammond, half, 3rd
team; 1907-Schultz, center, 1st team;
1909-Benbrook, guard, 1st team. Al-
lerdice, half, 2nd team; Magidsohn,
half, 2nd team; Casey, tackle, 3rd
team; 1910-Benbrook, guard, 1st
team; Wells, end, 1st team; 1911--
Wells, half, 3rd team; 1913-Craig,
half, 1st team. Paterson, center, 3rd

Michigan Star Gets Halfback Po
on Mythical Team. Is Give
Credit for Success of
Wolverines.
CAPTAIN PATERSON PICKED
AS CENTER ON THIRD '
Eastern Critic Mentions Pontiu
Hughitt 'on Season's Roll
of Honor.
Playing. in only two and one
games during the 1913 season,
B.. Craig, left halfback on the V
football eleven for the past
years, has been honored by 1)
Camp in his selections for the
All-American. Craig is given a
back's position on the first
along with Brickley of Harvard.
tain George C. Paterson was also
ored with the center's position c
third eleven.
In commenting on his selec
Camp, has the following to say
Craig:
"Craig of Michigan came to hi;
with a vengeance.
"Brickley and Mahan are both
er inclined to take the shortes
tance to the point they wish to r
while Craig is rather more fac
slipping the would-be tackler and
ing an opening. He was the mar
brought his team from a very med
beginning to the fruition of a con
success for Yost."
After discussing the qualities a
Jardiens, of Chicago center,
states that "Paterson of Michigar
Marting of Yale were both good
the latter particularly good in
charge."

Harvard offered the date of Novem-
ber 24 to Chicago a few days ago, but
the Midway university officials declined
to play at Harvard, because, it is stated
the playing of such a game would vio-
late western conference sentiment. It
was also intimated that the fact that
Harvard could not guarantee a return
engagement in Chicago in 1915 had
something to do with the refusal.
On receiving the Chicago declination.
Harvard offered the open date to Mich-
igan. According to newspaper stories
from Cambridge, Harvard had consid-
ered Michigan for the vacancy, but fi-
nally decided to submit the proposal to
Chicago. inasmuch is Chicago won the
-ejestern 'conference title this season,
and a game with>the Maroons would
mean more from an intersectional
title standpoint.
It is not thought, however, that the
uncertainty of a return engagement, on
the fact that Michigan appears to be the
second choice of Harvard, will m.ater-
ially actuate the final decision of the
Michigan athletic authorities. It is be-
lieved the matter will be decided ulti-
mately on whether the date Harvard can
offer the Volverines will be entirely
satisfactory from all Michigan stand-
points.
The greater portion of last evening's
meeting was spent in discussing the
plans for the new stands to be built
on Ferry field in accordance with the
action taken last spring, when it was
deemed wise to provide for the erec-
tion of a concrete seating structure,
which might in time be built into a
stadium. Several sets of plans and'
specifications were reviewed and the1
whole matter was finally put into the7
hands of a building committee, com-
posed of John D. Hibbard, Prof. A. S.
Whitney and John O. Murfin. This
committee will further investigate the
proposals before the board takes final
action on the proposition,
PERCY MACKAYE SENDS GOOD
WILL NOTE TO COMEDY CLUBa
"Best wishes for a most successful
performance of 'The Scarecrow' by the
Comedy club." This message was re-
ceived yesterday by the management;
of the club from Percy Mackaye,author

Secretary Rowe Sends Circular Letter
to All Wearers of the "M"
Explaining Purpose
of Club.
BARTELME OFFERS SECTION
OF SEATS AT ALL CONTESTS
Dues Consist of Nominal Entrance Fee.
Members Admitted Free to
Athletic Events.
In an effort to bring wearers of the
Varsity "M" into closer touch with
Michigan athletic affairs, steps have
been taken towards the formation of
a permanent "M' club.
Plans for such an organization were
first discussed at the time of the Penn-
sylvania game, when 13 "M" men met
at the Union and formed a temporary
club with Homer L. Heath, '07, as
chairman and Floyd A. Rowe, '08E,
as secretary and treasurer. Since that
time Secretary Rowe has compiled a
list of names and addresses of all men
who have ever won the Varsity letter
and is sending these men a circular
letter explaining the details and pur-
pose of the club.
With the end in view of making the
older men feel more at home, when re-
turning to Ann Arbor, Director Bar-
telxge has offered to reserve a certain
section of seats at all athletic contests,
to which "M" men alone will be ad-
mitted. Each wearer of the emblem
will be furished with a card which'
will admit him to all athletic events,
free of charge.
All members will be charged a nomi-
nal entrance fee, to take care of print-
ing and office expenses, but' beyond this
there will be no other fees or annual
dues. Several other large universities
have clubs of a similar nature and those
in charge feel confidant of the success
of the project here. A membership of
more than 500 is expected.
of the play to be given January 16.
Mr. Mackaye, who is one of the most
noted of the present day playwrights,
is an enthusiast for the civic theater
plan, and also for the present move-
ment to aid in the uplift of the drama.
"The Scarecrow" is one of the list of
plays that have been recommended by
the Drama League of America for both
professional and amateur production,
and is the first play from that list that
the Michigan club has attempted.

Unoficial Statements by Members
University Senate Do Not
Assure Recurrence
of Dance.

of

REFORMER TALKS
AT UNION TODAY
Graham Taylor, the eminent Chicago
sociologist, will address the members
of the Union at the regular Sunday
gathering at 3:00 o'clock, this after-
noon. His subject will be "Humaniz-
ing Industry and the Courts." Accord-
ing to Prof. C. H. Cooley, head of the'
sociology department,Mr. Taylor ranks
second only to Miss Jane Addams as a
leader of social work in the middle
west.
Profesor Taylor will speak at 6:30
o'clock, at the Majestic theater. Fol-
lowing his talk, he is to be entertained
by the Beta Epsilon fraternity.'
SENIOR LITS WILL VOTE
TUESDAY ON CANE QUESTION
The traditions committee of the sen-
ior literary class has completed its in-
vestigations, and will present a report
in favor of the adoption of canes, at
the class meeting, Tuesday afternoon.
Last year all of the larger senior
classes on the campus united in a re-
establishment of this seniordtradition,
the oldest and most persistent in the
history of the university. This year's
senior engineers have already adopted
canes, and if the seniors of the literary
department adopt them it is thought
that the tradition will be successfully
re-established.

SOCIOLOGY CLASS,
GOES TO JACKSON
The Michigan State Prison at Jack-
son was visited yesterday by more than
a score of men taking courses in soci-
ology. The trip was under the direct-
ion of Mr. A. E. Gillman, instructor in
sociology. The Michigan party was
jIoined at Jackson by a similar body of
students from Hillsdale College.
Chaplain E. H. Louden, who recently
delivered an address to the students in
this city, spent several hours with the
visitors. They were taken through the
cell blocks, hospital, school room, and
the many factories operated by the
prisoners.
The party visited the dining room
during the noon meal, where the 800 pris-
oners in the institution broke into an
open rebellion against the guards sev-
prison management was explained in
detail by the officials.
Norman Hill, '10, Talks, to Journalists
Norman Hill, '10, of the Detroit News
sport staff, was a principal speaker at
the Sigma Delta Chi luncheon at the
Michigan Union, yesterday. Hill was
a member of the local chapter while in
the university.

AUTHORITIES' RESOLUTION.
OPPOSES FAVORABLE ACTION;
Sponsors of Petition Claim That New
Proposition Eradicates Bad
Features.
According to unofficial statements
by members of -the university senate+
and by those closely conneted with
the situation, the petition asking for
the re-instatement of the J-Hop for
this year will meet with little favor at1
the session, of the senate on Monday,
and it is generally believed that the
board Wfill reject all proposals looking-
to a holding of the annual social affair
during the coming mid-semester re-
cess.
The action of the senate council,
last Monday night, in referring the
whole matter to the larger body, leav-
es the final settlement of the much-
discussed problen'to the vote of thej
faculty men at the coming assembly.
It is generally' believed that definite
action will be 'taken.<
The resolution, passed by the uni-
versity senate on February 14, is cited
by those interested in the re-instate-t
ment of the dance, as one of the rea-
sons why thi petition will be fruit-
less. The resolution contained the
clause:
"Resolved, That the Junior Hop be
discontinued until such time as th@
university authorities are satisfied that1
all. objectionable features will in the
future be discontinued."
Should the J-Hop be allowed for this
coming February, the terms of the,
resolution would not have been fulfill-
ed, in that there would have been no1
discontinuance, in the sense of the
resolution, of the annual affair. It is1
stated that the senate would not have
passed such a resolution had an im-]
mediate rescission of their action been
considered probable.
It is claimed by university authori-
ties that the committees in charge of
former hops have been especially act-

tion in the considera
son's list of quarter
PROF. H. E. RIGGS .
HIS DAUGHTER'S

Riggs, of the engineering depart
to Clarence D. Knight, '13L, of N
ton, Illinois, was announced a
former's home yesterday moi
Miss Riggs is a member of the I
Alpha Theta sorority. Mr. Knit
a member of the Trigon club and
in college was a member of the
sack and Barristers, honorary la
cieties.
OBERLIN PRESIDENT WILL
APPEAR ON UNION SERl
Dr. Henry C. King, presiden
Oberlin College, will be the speal
the Union Guild series in the Cc
gational church at 7:30 o'cloc
night.
one or more years, has been fe
those responsible for these fea
the university authorities, it is s
will hesitate to take any favorab
tion on the petition.
According to officials, there
possibility of a substitute J-Eop
in opposition to university auti
in view of the rule which give]l6
versity government jurisdiction
the students throughout the- c
year. Rumors that sli adance

"The Transfigured Christ"

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:30 A. M.

LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister.
12:oo-Student Classes. 6:30-C. E-

ive in attempts to eliminate the alleg- be attempted
ed evils of the big dance, but that they unfavorably o:
have been unsuccessful because of the denied officiall
inherent nature of these features reas it is b
which have come to be a part of the of the propos
affair. Until some salutary punish- big dance wl
ment, such as a discontinuance for under any gu

ed

_. - -

Congregational

Dr. Henry

Churchill

King

7:45 P.I

Church

President of Oberlin College

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