100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

a91

1ii

I_

C

F

r .

OEM=

1 J

____

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1913.

PRIEFIV

PR10E3 FIV]

it

CAST ROES THROUGH SKIT AT
FIRST MINSTREL REHEARSA.L

Y it

I

ORS

n Graduates Hold
)s Faculties
Country.
y For Michigan
has come to a
graduates of the
of the University

At the first rehearsal for the Union
minstrel show yesterday, the 13 men
who will compose the cast, went
through the musical part of the skit,
learning some of the new songs which
have been provided. The show will
last 45 minutes and two performances
will be given at the Christmas cele-
bration, to be held for Union mem-
bers Thursday night.
Among the musical numbers will be
"That Saxophone," a new melody by
Rowland Fixel, '12-'14L, and a med-
ley of Michigan songs, arranged by
Gordon C. Eldredge, '14. Rapid fire
interlocutions, bones and other burnt
cork stunts will be introduced into
next week's rehearsals.
ECONOMIST WEDS
TODAY IN CHICAGO-
Mr. S. M. Hamilton, of the econom-
ics department, will marry Miss Ednmi
Mae Bel Rickard, of Medina, Ohio, in
Chicago, at 8:30 o'clock this evening.

this department is
ghan, '75M, president
Medical Association,
nitation board in Cu-
nlish American wear,
rt in physiological
onorary member of
ungarian Societies of
arl Huber, '87M, pro-
y and embryology, is
the leading histolo-
ical world. Doctor
to open the discus-
;athetic Nervous Sys-
national Congress of
Londan last sum-
vy, '91M, head of the
tment, was the first
-:anosomna ,which
ness by artificial
ery led to the growth
ms in a similar2man-
in,'91M,professor of
Lde valuable contri-
cience, and showed
tuberculosis is her-
some children are

A TOUCH OF BLUES!
--
>t
II
"Iit

FOREIGNERS TO TAKE LUNCH
WITH .ADMINISTRATIVE BODY
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins, members
of the board of regents, ,Secretary
Shirley W. Smith and Fred L. Keeler,
state superintendent of public instruc-
tion, will be present at the luncheon
to be given by the Y. M. C. A. to the
foreign students in the university, at
12:00 o'clock noon on December 19, in
Newberry hall.
The affair aims to bring the for-
eigners into closer relationship with
the administrative body. Carl S. Metz-
ger, chairman of the committee on
foreign work, is in charge of the
luncheon. All students intending to
attend the affair, are requested to
communicate with Juan A.Bonilla,'15M,
A. E. Burbano, '16M, or C. P. Wang,

sEET THRE
MORE MEN F
PEACECONTI
Contestants Will Compete in IF
December 18; Winner t(
Represent Michigan at
State )feet.
UNIVERSITY HOLDS RECOM
O 1911 AND 1912 H
The three successful contest
last night's preliminaries fc

k

'14.

The wedding will take place in the
Cathedral Saints Peter and Paul, with
Dean Sumner of the divinity school of
the university of Chicago, officiating.
After the ceremony, a reception will
be tendered by the bride's parents, Mr.
and Mrs. George W. Rickard, in the
Auditorium hotel, Chicago.
The bride and groom will return to
Ann Arbor and take up temporary
quarters for the remainder of this
semester. A leave of absence for the
second semester has been granted by
the board of regents, and the honey-
moon will comprise an extended tour
of Europe. Miss Rickard is a gradu-
ate of Bucknell university, while Mr.
Hamilton graduated from Michigan in
1909.

TO TANGO OR NOT
TO TANGO-WHICH?.
Petitions, asking that the tango be
admitted to the annual (aance of the
Forestry club, were circulated in the
classes of the forestry department yes-
terday. The papers were put in the
field to combat the petitions circulat-
ed last Friday, asking that the dance
be restricted to a "straight two-step
and waltz program."
The discussion as to whether or not
the tango shall have life in the for-
estry department has now reached a
heated tempest. Supporters on each
side are busy endeavoring to outwit
the other side in the number of sig-
natures by next Wednesday, when the
Forestry club will formally pass on
the later dancing steps.
It is planned to hold the dance im-
mediately following the Christmas hol-
days.

Peace contest were C. O. Chai
HT. Goldstick, '15L, and W. E.
'1 2-'141-.1B. J. Jonkman, law
Was chosen alternate. Thes
men together with J. W. Hardi
and H. C. Tallinadge, '14, w
pete in a final contest on D
18, the winner of which will re
Michigan in the state contest
vet; and if successful at th
state contest at Cleveland, at
tional contest at Lake Mohon
The orators and their speec
ranged in the order of their
ance in the final will be asf
Harding-"The Price of Peac
the American Standpoint"; Y
"The Price of Peace"; Talln
"The Passing of the Soldier";
"The Unity of the World"; G
--". The World Crisis."
Harding, Tallmadge, and G
were successful in the prelir
last year; Goldstick is also a
bater. Chan is a Chinese gove
scholar. Morris was promine
debater in the University of
last year.
The final contest is a number
Oratorical association progr
which course tickets will adm
judges will be selected from th
ty of the university and of Y
N-ormal college, Some pro
member of the Detroit Alumni
ation will preside.
Michigan'srepresentative P
V. Blanshard, '14, won the n
Peace contest in 1911, and his 1
Paul B. Blanshard, '14, was vic
in the 1912 contest.

tead of the department of
id clinical surgery is Dr.i
ylard de Nancrede, late ma-
lef surgeon of the U. S. V.
one time held the senior
ency of the American Sur-
ty, and up to last year, was
rofessor of clinical surgery
mouth medical sehool. He
r of the French and Roman
cieties.
en Peterson, Bates profes-
rmacology, gynecology and
enjoys an international
in his division of the medi-
nd has brought his depart-
ational and international

Dr. William J. Mayo, '83M, one of
the most famous and skilled surgeons
in America, has founded and built up
the greatest clinic in the world, which
is attended by many noted surgeons.
Dr. William Pilcher, a surgeon of
Brooklyn, N. Y., founded the "Annals
of Surgery," the greatest medical
journal printed in English. Dr. John
E. Weeks, '81M, now practicing op-
thalmology in New York City, is the
discoverer of the bacterial origin of
conjunctivitis, and the author of a
comprehensive treatise on opthalmol-
ogy. Harlow Weeks, is a professor of
pathology in the famous Belleview
Medical College in New York City, and
is a frequent contributor to the lead-
ing medical journals.
On the medical faculty of the great
Johns Hopkins University are four
graduates of the Michigan medical
school. Dr. William J. Howell, recipi-
ent of an honorary degree in 1890, is
professor of physiology in the famous
Baltimore institution, and the author
of the text book which is generally us-
ed among English speaking people. Dr.
John J. Abel, '83M, professor of phar-
macology, has made brililant discov-
eries in his line of work, and is now
editor of the American Journal of
Pharmacology. Dr. Franklin P. Mall,
'8311, professor of anatomy, has
brought fame to his university by his

CHICAGO SOCIAL REFORMER
WILL TALK TO CHINESE CLUB
Prof. Graham Taylor of Chicago,
the noted social reformer, will open
the series of talks on social welfare
themes, to be given before the Chinese
Students' club, with an address on
'The Practical Application of the
Teachings of Jesus to Some Modern
Civic Problems," in MacMillan hall at
12:00 o'clock tomorrow noon.
A committee was recently appointed
by the club to cooperate with Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson, of the engineering de-
partment to secure men of national
and international repute to present the
lifferent phases of social work, in
which they have won their reputation
A similar program was presented
last year with success, under the
Tharge of the club committee and Prof.
Thomas E. Rankin, of the rhetoric de-
partment, and Professor Nelson.

thor of many popular articles on hy-
iene, is one of the most widely-known
graduates of the medical department.
Dr. Walter E. Courtney, '83M, now
chief surgeon of the Northern Pacific
Railroad, has made great advances in
the technique of the treatment of rail-
road injuries, and Dr. R. W. Corwin,
71M, has, for years, held the position
as chief surgeon for the Colorado Coal
and Fuel Company, which maintains
at Pueblo a hospital equipped to care
nor and treat its 30,000 employees.
Among the women graduates of the
medical department are Dr. Alice
Hamilton, '93M, pathologist and bac-
teriologist and an aid of Jane Addams
in her work of Hull House, who is
now doing federal research work in
lead poisoning; Dr. Lydia DeWitt,'98M,
research worker in anatomy and mor-
phology; and Dr. Bertha Van Hoosen,

BODY TO EXAMINE
SELECTION PLANS
Allan T. Ricketts, '15E, H. S. Hul-
bert, '14M, and T. F. McCoy, '14L, have
been appinted by President Cyril
Quinn of the student council, to exam-
ine the plans which have been sub-
mitted to the secretary relative to
changing the formation of the council,
and the methods of electing its mem-
bers. A report on the salient features
embodied in each, will be submitted to
the council at its next rneetiug, which
will be held after the holidays.
Paul Blanshard, '14, and Harry
Gault, '15, were appointed to draft a
tentative amendment to the student
council constitution regarding the
election of graduate department coun-
cil members..
WRESTLERS TO COMPETE IN
LOCAL AND FOREIGN MEETS
Outside wrestling matches for uni-
versity grapplers, will be considered.
at a meeting. of the lightweight mat
artists, to be held this afternoon at
2:30 o'clock, in the wrestling room at
Waterman gymnasium. The meeting
will be in charge of B. E. Champ, '14D,
one of the men in charge of the wrest-
ling activities this year. At a later
meeting, the men in the other classes
will be called together by H. G. Light-
ner, '14E.
Cups will be given for the champion-
ship in heavy, middle, light, and feath-
er weight classes this fall, the series
of elimination matches to begin short-
ly after the holidays. No outside
matches will be scheduled until after
the campus titles are settled, the men
winning the different events becoming
automatically members of the Mich-
igan team, according to the plans.

BOARD COMPLETES
YEAR BOOK STAFF
Associate editors of the Michiganen-
sian were chosen by the board in con-
trol of student publications at its meet-
ing yesterday afternoon. The following
men were selected: literary depart-
ment, Leo Burnett, '14, Morris A. Mil-
ligan, '14, and Miss Irma Hogadone,
'14; engineering department, George
W. Ballentine, '14E, and Francis W.
DuBois, '14E; law department, Harry
W. Lippincott, '14L, and John R. Ober,
'14L.; medical department, Q. 0. Gil-
bert, '14M; and the combined depart-
ments, E. J. Phillips, '14H.
COMPLETES AMERICAIN EDITION
OF FRESSEN'S "JOERN VUHL."
Prof. Warren W. Florer, of the Ger-
man department, has just completed
the preparation of the American edi-
tion of Fressen's "Joern Uhl." In this
work, Professor Florer has been assist-
ed by the author himself, who has
given him a complete account of his
life, and of the sources of his works.
The material has been inaccessible be-
fore, and will throw some light on
misunderstood problems in Fressen's
work.
The work has been made possible
only after extended correspondence
between the author and the editor. It
is now being printed by D. C. Heath
and Company.
SOPH ARCHITECTS DESERT
ENGINEERS; ELECT OFFICERS
Soph architects organized Thursday
evening as a distinct division from the
soph engineers, electing the following
officers: president, Sherwood Holt;
vice-president, George Everson; sec-
retary, R. B. Frantz and treasurer,
C. A. Stuchell. Harold L. Corsett was
chosen general athletic manager.

-Union last night. Donald F. Melhorn.
'14L, was toastmaster. The speakers
of the evening were Rowland W. Fixel,
12-'14L, Roy R. Fellers, '15, Karl J.
Mohr, '15, Werner W. Schroeder, '14,
and Faul B. Blanshard, '14, president
of the society. Edward G. O'Neill, '15,
rendered a piano solo.
TO STAGE NEXT BIG GAME
WITH AGGIES IN LANSING
Michigan will play M. A. C. at East
Lansing next fall, according to an in-
terview given out by Coach Macklin
yesterday at that city, in which he
stated that this contest. would be the
big game for the Farmers.
Macklin announced that no steps
have been taken to schedule another
game with Wisconsin, or any other
western conference team. The "Ag-
gie" coach had nothing to say in re-
gard to the rumored game with Wash-
ington and Jefferson.
To Talk on "The Transfigured Christ"
The Rev. Leonard Barrett, pastor of
the First Presbyterian church, will
give his sermon on "The Transfigured
Christ" at the usual morning service
omorrow. The sermon is one of the
eight lectures, given by Pastor Barrett
at the Y. W. C. A. conference last
summer. Four of these have been
popularized. The remaining three
will be given at the following Sunday
services.

SAYS "CO-OP" STORE NEEDS
$1,000 AND EFFICIENT M
"All that is needed for a Michig,
'co-op' store at present is $1,000 ca
ital stock and an efficient man to ri
it," said Werner W.Schroeder, '14-'16
of the council "co-op" committee ye
terday.
Schroeder expects to have tentati
plans completed for raising the mo
ey at the end of the holidays. I
thinks the money can be had in a w
similar to the Wisconsin system, th
of selling $1.00 shares of stock- a:
declaring a divident to stockholde
on their purchases. Like the Wisco
sin system, Schroeder does not inter
to cut prices directly and create nee
less opposition among booksellers.
FEATURES NEW YORK ALUMNI
IN NEXT ISSUE OF AUIINI
The December issue of- the Alun
nus, which appears December 15,
devoted to the Michigan alumni ass
ciations of New York. It includes
account of the history and work
both the men's and women's associ
tions, and lists of prominent wom4
graduates in the state. It also co
tains a resume of the football seaso

ADELPHI CELEBRATES FIFTY.
SIXTH BIRTHDAY AT UNION
The Adelphi literary debating soci-
Aty celebrated its fifty-sixth anniver-
sary by a banquet at the Michigan

research work in his subject. Dr. '88M, one of the leading practitioners
Henry Hurd, '66M, was, until recent- of Chicago.
ly, superintendent of the Johns Hop- The record of the medical depart-
kins hospital, and is an authority on ment is posted in the medical hall of
diseases of the nervous system. fame, and men of the same caliber are
Dr. Woods M. Hutchinson, '84M, au- now in the making.

and articles on the advisory sy
Sphinx Hold Fall Party at Union in use at the university. All se
Members of Sphinx, the junior liter- will receive copies.
ary society, held their annual fall
dance at the Union last night. Fifty Sweet-Laing Engagement Annou
couples enjoyed the dancing which The engagement of Miss Elizabe
commenced at 9:00 o'clock. Finzel's Sweet, '14, to C. Bruce Laing, '11
orchestra of Detroit furnished the mu- was announced yesterday by
sic and Prof. and Mrs. J. A. C. Hild- Sweet at a diner given at the
ner and Prof. and Mrs. C. P. Wagner Gamma house, and by Mr. Laing,
were the chaperones. Trigon and Phi Delta Phi house

ster
enio
mne
eth

U

RU

rose,

DE PA UW
UNIVERSITY

Methodist Ch

11

Sunday Ev

I
' _ l

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan