100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 10, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11

I'

"C

igan

a

ly

IN ANSWER TO OBST

A

T

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

-i

i

PRESENT
NJ OF ARC"
PAGEANTRY

[SENIOR LITS PREPARE FOR
CHRISTMAS DINNER PARTY
Tickets for the senior lit Christmas
party to be held at the Michigan Un-
ion next Wednesday are sell-
ing rapidly. Cards admitting to
both the dinner and dance may
be procured for $1.25 by those holding
series tickets to the dinners. For
others there will be an extra fee of 60
cents. Admission to the dance with-
out the dinner will be 75 cents.:
The affair will be the biggest of in-
formal senior functions. Some of the
decorations for the Christmas celebra-
tion to be held Thursday, will be up
in time for the senior function. John
I. Lippincott, '14, will act as toast-
master at the dinner.

I

GRADUATES ELECT
COUNCIL MEBE

I

borate Presentation to
by University Women
May Festival
Time.

Be Staged
About j

lION WILL BE UNDER
CTION OF PROF. KENYON
A bout Palmer Field Will
ow Event to Be Given
There.
Arc, in the form of an elabo-'
ant, will be held by the Wom-
.e, on Palmer field about the
e May Festival. This produc-
h is the first of-its kind ever
inn Arbor, will be under the
of Prof. Herbert A. Kenyon,
aclude more than 350 women
versity. The actors will be
y competition, to be started
he spring.
irandebury; '14, is chairman
ecutive committee, which is
the whole affair, and the
nmittees will soon be an-

TO TEST, MEN FOR'
OPERA TOMORROW
Tryouts for speaking positions
in the 1914 Michigan Union
opera' will be held at 7:00
o'clock tomorrow night in the
Adelphi rooms on the fourth floor of
University hall. All men must try for
positions, whether members of previ-
ous opera casts or not. Each tryout is
urged to come prepared with a brief
and appropriate selection, the reading
of lengthy and serious pieces having
retarded previous tryouts considera-
bly.

At a special meeting of the members
of the graduate department yesterday
afternoon, John C. Brier was elected
as graduate school representative to
the student council, in accordance
with the council's invitation, which
was extended at the last regular meet-
ing of that body.
The action taken is the resultO of
considerable agitation. It was felt
that as the members of the graduate
department were not affiliated with
any regular class which had council
members, that it was unjust to be sub-
jected to council decrees. Although
there was some opposition to the
movement among the graduate stu-
dents, the motion that a representa-
tive be elected, passed by an almost
unanimous vote.
Brier will represent the 230 grad-
uates as a department, and not as a
class, as the council's suggestion that
the graduates organize, by electing
regular class officers, was not adopt-
ed. It was felt that the Graduate club
takes the place of a regular class or-
ganization.
Readers Will Present Free Recital.
A public recital will be given byl
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister's class in in-
terpretive reading at 8:00 o'clock to-{
night in room 302 north wing, Uni-
versity hall. No admission will bel
charged. The program will consist of
18 short popular selections.
LANGDON-DAVIES I
ASKS FOR PEACE,

ATHLETIC TUTORS
COUNSEL. 1917 MEN
If numbers and enthusiasm point to
anything, freshman track athletics are
due for a record year. The first year
track men turned out last night in
greater numbers than in any other
year, and were given short talks by
the athletic guardians of the universi-
ty.

DRAMA LEAGUJE IS TO BACK
.THREE SUPERIOR COMPANIES
The Drama league, whose aim is to
encourage better plays, has arranged
to bring three productions to Ann Ar-
bor this season, by guaranteeing ex-
penses.
George Arliss has been booked in
his latest play, "Disraeli," while the
Irish Players, and the Repertoire Co.,
from the Fine Arts Theater of Chi-
cago, have also consented to come.
All students desiring to get good seats
at these plays may sign a list at the
Union desk.
There is no charge, and those sign-
ing the slip will have first choice of
seats. The productions will all be
staged at the Whitney theater, and if-
they are well supported, the Drama
league will book more for next year.

DANCERS

BE REST

Trainer "Steve" Farrell made the
longest speech to the newcomers, in
which he outlined the work of the in-
door season, and a few ideas for pre-
liminary training. Director Bartelme
spoke of the schedule, which he hopes
to arrange, including an indoor and an
outdoor meet.
Captain Kohler told the men that
the work this year is to prepare them
for the Varsity of the next season, and
that they could be sure of the coopera-
tion of Trainer Farrell and himself in
this. Coach Rowe and "Pat" Crowe,
Varsity track manager, also spoke.
Each speaker impressed the fact on
the yearlings that their first duty is
to keep up their studies, and that the
actual track work in the gymnasium
and on the field should be only second-
ary.
As the freshmen left, their names
and "prep" school records were col-
lected, and notification will be sent out
after the holidays, when the real work
of conditioning will begin. A captain
for the All-Fresh track team will not
be elected until the season is well un-
der way, probably not until the;middlel
of January.1
COLLIER'S HONORS
VARSITY PLAYERS

BY- NEW RI
Committee Compiles Complet
Suggestions at Gather:
Held Yesterday
Afternoon.
VULGAR VARIETIES ARE
DESCRIBED BY REFI

Asked

That Greater Disen
Exercised in Choie
of Music.

Earl Moore has been chos-
charge of the music, and
or story of the play is now
en. The library has order-
selection of books on the
Joan of Arc, and these will
ced on the general reading
encourage the reading of
there was an agitation for
this nature, but the lack of
e around Palmer field made
le. Sufficient money has
raised from the women's
, three fifths of which the
,ided shall go toward the
it of Palmer field, so as to
building of a wire fence to
ie entire grounds. It will
$600, and will be put up

e winter.

CATION.

(The Michigan Daily assumes no re-
sponsibility for sentiments express-
ed in communications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Your notice of the Phi Beta Kappa
meeting, to be held in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall, on Thursday evening at
7:30 o'clock, contains several miscon-
ceptions. Plainly, a meeting of any so-
ciety can be open to members only.
But (1), last year, at its annual gen-
eral meeting, the chapter resolved to
call all seniors and juniors to hear
some facts about the society. (2) The
purpose of this gathering is, to ex-
plain the nature of the society, and to
inform students just what the basis
and methods of election are. (3) As
a further effort to bring the society
into more direct contact with the stu-
dent body, the annual general meeting
also resolved to make the initiation
address, by a distinguished guest, open
to the public. It will be held in one of
the halls of the campus, and not at the
banquet, as in previous years. All in-
terested will be free to attend. (4)
Your leader, on personality, also sug-
gests misunderstanding, and I will,
take occasion to refer to this question
in my address on Thursday evening.
' R. M. WENLEY,
President of the Michigan Chapter.'
DARTMOUTH MUSICAL CLUBS
DESIRE COMBINED CONCERT
Word has been received from the
Dartmouth musical clubs, by H. Beach
Carpenter, '14, of the Glee and Man-
dolin clubs, proposing that a' combin-
ed concert be held at Ann Arbor next
April. Michigan was forced to turn
the offer down, because of a conflict
with the western tour which will be
taken at that time. It may be possible,
however, that another date may be
agreed upon, if it can be scheduled at
such a time as not to interfere with
the date already tentatively reserved
for the musical clubs of the university

The elimination process will be us-
ed, and if the number remains too
large after tomorrow night's weeding,
a second trial will be held. Men will
also be tested for singing ability, al-
though there are some of the cast
parts which do not require it.
All music for the show must be in
by Monday, and positively no compet-
itive selections will be received after
this date. There are several men of
recognized musical ability working on
the melodies, while the prelude and
finalle are being composed by Willis
A. Diekema, '14,. who wrote a large
share of the music for "Contrarie
Mary."
ORVILLE WRIGHT MAY SPEAK
TO AERONAUTIC STUDENTS
Negotiations have been opened with
Orville Wright, famous aviator, of
Dayton, Ohio, in an attempt to bring
him to Ann Arbor, under the auspices
of the Aero club and the Engineering
society, immediately after Christmas
vacation.
At the first meeting of the Aero club
after vacation, C. S. Fliedner, eng.
special, will explain the construction
of the Wright air-boat, and describe
the Wright factory in Dayton, the
greatest of its kind in the country.
DR, ANGELL AGAIN
ABLE TO LECTURE
For the first time since his recov-
ery, President-emeritus James B. An-
gell spoke at the banquet given by
members of the Cosmopolitan club
last night, in honor of Mr. B. N. Lang-
don-Davies, secretary of the Garton
Foundation of England, and Kiyo Sue
Inui, '06, the Japanese peace advocate.
The guests of honor and President
Henry Hurwitz, of the Intercollegiate
Menorah association also gave short
talks at the gathering.
Osborn Sends Hippopotamus Torsil
The university has received the fos-
sil of a Madagascar hippopotamus,
sent by Chase S. Osborn, who is now
traveling in that territory. A letter
from the ex-governor says that he is
leaving Natal,South Africa, for Ceylon,
Burmah and India.

SYMPHONY MUSIC
CHARMS AUDIENCE
A perfection of finish and detail, a
delicacy of nuance and shading, char-
acterized the playing of the Philadel-
phia Symphony orchestra last night in
Hill auditorium, under the leadership
of the noted Polish conductor, Leopold
Stokowski. Such ensemble has rarely,
been heard in Ann Arbor before. The
appreciation of the audience was evi-
dent, if prolonged applause may be
taken as a sign of satisfaction.
Tschaikowsky's superb Fifth Sym-
phony formed the central part of the
program. From the melodious Andan-
te, through to the stirring finale, Mr.
Stokowski's men played with rare in-
terpretative feeling. Equally well
done were the overture and Venusberg
music from "Tannbheuser"; "Wagner's3
glowing melody and vast climaxes ry
ceiving sympathetic treatment.1
The soloist of the evening was Thad-
deus Rich, who played a Wieniawski
concerto with orchestra accompani-
ment. His style was that of a concert-
master rather than that of a solo play-
er, who-is accustomed to conjole and
humor an audience. Tonal beauty, and
poetical insight were revealed in his{
playing.-
IOWANS GIVE SUCCESSFUL
PRODUCTION OF "SCARECROW"

"The United States, perhaps alone
of nations, can declare that its public
opinion is on the side of sane, reason-
ed paciflism," said Mr. B. N. Langdon-
Davies on "The Economical Waste of
War" yesterday afternoon.
"The moral force of America is in-
valuable for our campaign in Europe,
because the peace ideal in this coun-1
try is so strong, and here European
affairs seem to be in perspective.
"Europe is going bankrupt," contin-
ued the lecturer, "and the reason is
her waste expenditure. England alone
spends every year $400,000,000 on ar-
mament. Ten million of her 45,000,000
of people are in poverty. The burden
of taxation is ever on the increase.
Thatathere is no benefitfor thepeo-
ple, all sane men, who think of these
things, are agreed. It is the special
duty of the student of the world," he
added, "to solve the problem." The
English peace advocate gave an ex-
haustive refutation for the arguments
in favor of armament.
Following the lecture, the speaker
was tendered a banquet by the mem-
bers of the Cosmopolitan club. He
was the guest of President Harry B.
Hutchins at the Choral Union concert
He left at 9:30 o'clock last night for
Detroit. He will speak in Cleveland
today. He has also consented to- be
the associate editor in England of the
Cosmopolitan Student, the organ of
the International federation of Stu-
dents, which comes to Michigan next
January.
Glee Club Elects Assistant Manager.
Wilson Shafer, '15, was elected as-
sistant business manager of the Glee
and Mandolin clubs at a meeting of the
executive committee of the combined
clubs, held at the Union Sunday.
President to Address Detroit Alumni
President Harry B. Hutchins will
speak tonight in the Edelweiss cafe, in
Detroit, at a luncheon of the Detroit
Association of Michigan Alumni. He
will go to Lima, Ohio, December 16, to
attend a dinner of the Michigan alum-
ni of that district.
Toastmasters Club to Dine at Union.,
Toastmasters club will hold its reg-
ular monthly dinner at the Union at
6:00 o'clock tonight. Wintred Cook,
'14E, will preside.

Collier's Weekly, in its current is-
sue, publishes an All-Western football.
team, selected by E.C. Paterson. Craig,
Pontius and Paterson are the Wolver-
ines honored by places on the first
team.
Chicago also has three players on
the first eleven, the remainder of the
selections being distributed as fol-
lows:Minnesota two, and Wisconsin,
Notre Dame, and M. A. C. one each.
No Michigan men are placed on the
second team, although Allmendinger
and Hughitt are given favorable men-
tion.
The first team is as follows:
Player Position Institution
Solon . . ......... L.E. .....Minnesota
Pontius ......,...L.T.......Michigan
Shaughnessy,....L.G....... Minnesota
Des Jardien..C......Chicago
Paterson......R.G.......Michigan
Butler........ ,R.T. .....Wisconsin
Miller........R.E.......M. A. C.
Russell........Q.B.....Chicago
Craig. ... ..L.H......Michigan
Norgren.......R.H.......Chicago
Eichenlaub. F.-.....Notre Dame

Subsequent to the investigations p
taining to the objectionable featur
of dancing, made by the committee
late dances, the following suggestio
were compiled and presented yeste
day afternoon, with the view to i
fluence student sentiment in favor
better dancing conditions.
Division One.
1. To all committees handling dan
es, let it be known that vulgar dan
ing will not be tolerated. What is, an
what is not vulgar dancing, we shb
not attempt to define. We feel that
cannot be defined, and that it can 1
eliminated only by a desire on th
part of the individual to.keep dancin
at an unquestionable standard.
2. That only such music be procu
ed that will tend to cultivate prope
dancing.
3. That efforts be made to hol
more afternoon and dinner dance
than late evening dances. This wil
eliminate some of the mid-week pa
ties.
4. That members of the faculty r
spond more readily to the requests
chaperone dances.
Division Two.
1. All mid-week dances should 1
avoided wherever possible. Where
has been found impossible to holy
dances on Fridays, holidays, and night
preceding holidays, they shall stk
not later than 12:00 o'clock midnigh
2. All dances held on Friday night
and nights preceding holidays, sha
stop not later than 2:Q0( o'clock, excej
on the occasion of dances traditiona
with societies.
3. All informal dances given in ti
evening by the different classes, soc
eties or other campus organization
should commence at 8:00o'clock.
4. Persons requested to chaperor
dances shall refuse to do so, unles
such parties are conducted in accord
ance with the rules adopted.
Signed:
ROBERT STURTEVANT, Chairma:
FRANK MURPHY.
J. HERBERT WILKINS, Jr.
A. O. WILLIAMS.
MAURICE LOHMAN.
That the calling of the conventk
on late dances is warranted, these tec
facts are presented.
The books of the Michigan Unic
and Granger's show that the majoril
of the evenings for each week of th
semester are engaged for dances, mar
of which last from 2:00 to 3:00 o'cloc
in the morning. Because of the rel
tively small number of women, in con
parison to the number of men attend
ing these dances, it was found tha
frequently women average three o
four dances a week.
NUMERALS WILL BE AWARDED
TO DESERVING SOCCER ME

DATES BOOKED FOR CORNELL
MICHIGAN BASEBALL GAMES
Cornell's baseball team will appear
on Ferry field May 13, and Michigan
will play at Ithaca May 23, according
to the schedule issued yesterday by
the athletic authorities of the eastern
institution.
Last year Michigan won both games
from Cornell, on May 14, defeating the
Red team here 6 to 2, and on May 21,
humbling Cornell at home, 5 to 3. The
dates indicate that the eastern trip
will come at approximately the same
time this season as last.
Conference Decides Not to Expand
The Western Intercollegiate Confer-
ence decided that it was inexpedient
to enlarge that body at its recent
meeting, thus disposing of the matter
of admitting Nebraska and Notre
Dame.
Pontius Gets Mythical Tackleship..
Michigan is given a place on the
All-American team, selected by Parke
H. Davis, of'*the football rules com-
mittee. Pontius is picked as one of
the two premier tackles of this fall's
teams.

Members of the two literary socie-
ties at the University of Iowa com-
bined last week to present the "Scare-
crow," by Percy Mackaye, the same
production which will be given Janu-
ary 16 by the Comedy club. The Io-
wans, like the Michigan dramatists,
experienced much difficulty in hand-
ling the elaborate stage equipment de-
manded by the play, but in spite of
this handicap, those in charge seemed
highly pleased with the result.
CONTEST ATTRACTS
SEVERAL ARTISTS
Competeition for three prizes in the
Comedy club poster contest will end
at 6:00 o'clock Friday night. A dozen
men have already signified their inten-
tion of submitting posters, and three
are now in the hands of the publicity
manager of the club. With the en-
trance of several of the illustrators of
the Gargoyle, competition promises to
be brisk.
The three prize winners will be
announced next Monday, at which
time the selected poster will. be
sent to Detroit, so that everything
will be in readiness for printing im-
mediately after Christmas vacation.
BOAT CLUB MEN TO SMOKE
AT UNION TOMORROW NIGHT
The Michigan Union Boat club will
hold a get-to-gether smoker at the
Union, tomorrow night. G. P. Bailey,
'16, will officiate at the piano and a
special quartette will sing. Profes-
sors Hus, Reighard, and Kenyon, H.
S. Hulbert, '14M, and H. S. Parsons,
'15E, will speak. Tickets for the
smoker can be obtained from the fol-
lowing committee: J. C. Abbott, '15E,
chairman; E. K. Hill, '17E; A. V. Mc-
Iver, '14E; A. Chipman, '14; E. W.
Bisbee, '16, and J. W. Finkenstaedt,
'16E, or at the Union desk.

At a meeting of the Board of Di:
tors of the athletic association, M
day night, it was decided to aw
the members of the soccer squad v
their class numerals. The men h
worked hard all season, and h
been successful in their ga:
with outside institutions.
The State Normal school at Ypsil
ti held the Michigan artists to a 1 t
tie in their first encounter, but w
completely outclassed in the sec
contest by a score. of 5 to 1. The ]
tie Creek school of physical train
fell before the Michigan- players I
hard fought 1 to 0 game.
Director Floyd Rowe and soc
manager Glenny will select the 15
cer players, who will receive the c
eted insignia.

Aiany Aspirants for Oratorical Play
Thirty-five are trying out for "She
Stoops to Conquer," the play to be
given by the Oratorical association this
year. The cast is now being selected
by Prof. Richard D. T. Hollister, of the
oratory depatrment, who is directing
the production.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan