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December 09, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-09

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ucn igan

Daly

THINK OF ATORCH
IPARADE FOR I. SC]

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

ETITION
NEPLACED
IE SENATE

ouncil Fails to Take Definite
ion on Petition Fir
Reinstatement of
Dance.
STUDENT COUNCIL
1IITTEE ENDORSES PLAN
f Annual Dance Thini Action
f Governing Board Is
Favorable.
nate council, at its session
, failed to take definite action
atter of the petition asking
e-instatement of the J-Hop,
eferring the whole question
iversity senate, which meets
day. The action of the coun-
ver, is looked upon as favor-
e question, in that the mem-
not pre-emptorily turn dowr
on.
)t considered that either the
915 Hop committees, or the
tudent council committee,
any action until after the
eets next week. The 1914
members feel that they
e all that they can do, and
whole matter is now up to
e. The 1915 committee may
.e time this week to effect
I of organization so as to be
act as soon as it is known
will be a Hop, should the

LACK OF UNDERSTANDING IS
CHIEF CAUSE OF TROUBLE
K. S. Ind, Former Michigan Honor
Orator, Tells of True Sentiments
in Japan.
Lack of understanding and selfish-
ness were the main reasons given by
K. S. Inui, '06, former Michigan orator,
for the dissension between the East
and West, in his reading on "America
vs. Japan" in University Hall, before
an appreciative audience last evening.
Mr. Inui developed his subject in an
interesting and logical manner, enliv-
ening it with touches of humor and
human experiences. Conflicting views,
the vast difference between the East
and West, exaggeration and suspicion,
were the four underlying reasons for
this misunderstanding, according to
Mr. Inui. He stated that never was
Japan so far from wanting war with
the United States, but on the contra-
ry had great confidence in America.
"The Japanese in America are bet-
tering themselves all the time," he
said, "and are trying to become good
citizens. If we went to war with you
it would be the weakening of one or
the other, and Japan is in no condition
for weakening."
MAY SEND THREE
TEAMS TO GAMES
Possibility That Michigan Will Have
Trio of Relay Squads at Annual
Penn Meet.
1IANY RECRUITS TO TRY OUT.

WILL

ENGLISHMAN WILL
SPEAK ON 'PEACE'
Bernard Noel Langdon-Da-ies to Talk
in Economics Lecture Hall
at 4:30 'clock.

BE G(UEST AT BANQIJET.

Mr. Bernard Noel Langdon-Davies,
secretary of the Garton Foundation,
London, England, will give a public
lecture under the combined auspices
of the university and the Cosmopoli-
tan club, at 4:30 o'clock this afternoon
in the economics lecture room. His
subject will be "The Basis of Interna-
tional Peace."
Mr. Langdon-Davies will be enter-
tained by members of -the Cosmopoli-
tan club at a banquet to be held in
Newberry hall following the lecture.,
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins, Kiyo Sue
Inui, '06, founder of the local chapter
of the Cosmopolitan club, Professors
Jesse S. Reeves, of the political science
department, Thomas C. Trueblood, of
the oratory department, Regent J. E.
Beal and Pres. Henry Hurwitz of the
Intercollegiate Menorah association
will talk at the banquet.
Mr. Langdon-Davies is on a lecture
tour throughout this country under
the auspices of the American associa-
tion for International Conciliation,
where he follows Senator de'Estour-
nelles de Constant of France, and Bar-
oness Von Suttner of Austria, as vis-
iting lecturer.
The English peace advocate will
speak from the impressions of the
present peace situation on the conti-
nent of Europe, in the light of those
ideas which are not based upon moral
consideration, but from the viewpoint
of economics.
Mr. Langdon-Davies is master of
arts of Cambridge 'University, Eng-
land. While in college, he was pres-
ident of the Cambridge Union, winning
the highest honor a Cambridge under-
graduate can gain. He was also a
member of the Cambridge varsity
crew.
NOTED OCHESTRA
TO PLAY TONIGHT

PHI BETA KAPPA
OPENS MEETINGS
Ionor Society Will Allow junior and
Senior .hits to Attend
Sessions.
FIRST OPEN MEETING TIURSDkYT
Phi Beta Kappa, departing from
time-worn custom, will invite the
members of the senior and junior
classes of the lit department to attend
its meeting Thursday evening in Sar-
ah Caswell Angell hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Prof. W. A. Frayer, of the history de-
partment, will give a talk on the his-
tory, nature and purpose of the so-
ciety. Professor R. M.'Wenley will al-
so speak.
The society has decided that in the
future it shall be its policy to allow
members of these classes to attend the
different meetings of the society, to
allow the campus to become more fa-
miliar with the workings and nature
of the society.
This is an extreme departure from
the past rules of the organization, and
marks a progressive step in honorary
institutions.
I"A(CULTY FE NCER S DEFEAT
STU~DENTS IN FOIl1 MATCHES

"ROWDY F1ROSI1" AD)OPTED) AS
First Year M11en Start dew Tradition
Wlhichl They Rope to Make
Permanent.
The resolution, drawn up by the
fresh lit traditions committee, that ev-
ery freshman shall, from now on, greet
his classmates on the campus with the
words "howdy frosh," was enthusias-
tically received by fresh lits at their
class smoker at the Union last night.
The originators of the idea hope to
push the campaign through in such a
manner that a permanent campus tra-
dition will be established.
A committee, composed of Glen How-
land, Donald A. Finkbeiner, Willis D.
Nance, Harold F. Korn, Ward Harry-
man, Perry Holmes and John Parker,
was appointed to promote the move-
ment in every possible manner. This
committee will get in touch with the
freshman engineer class, and attempt
to gain its cooperation.
In line with this work creating class
unity among the freshmen, the tradi-
tion committee appointed at the be-
ginning of the year, made a report.
They have printed cards outlining the
most generally known traditions to be
observed by new comers, and distrib-
uted these at the smoker last evening.
SIMPLE SPELLING
LEARNE EAILY
German and Italian Childreai Learn to
Spell in Less rTime, Says
Propagandist.
WILL SAVE ONE TO TWO YEARS

council committee, to
added representatives
r lits and junior engi-
I the proposed plan at
t evening, previous to
the senate council, and
as made known to Prof.
the non-athletic com-

Owing to the fact that the senate
council members deemed it harmful
to make public the proposed plans, the
nature of the recommendations will
probably not be made known until af-
ter the senate meeting next week.
TAN7O CAUSES TROUBLE IN
RANKS OF FORESTRY CLUB
Embryo Rangers Threaten to Bar
Dance From Program in Coming
Festivities. .
Whether or not the tango shall be
admitted to the Forestry club dance
is causing worlds of trouble among
the would-be forest rangers. All are
agreed that they want a dance, but
whether it shall be "an honest-to-
goodness dance," as the straight two-
step and waltz advocates put it, or
whether the later steps shall be per-
mitted, is the all-vexing problem.
The club placed the problem before
the foresters at a recent meeting and
five spoke for, and five spoke against,
the tango, with the result that no ac-
tion was taken. However, now' the
supporters of the "straight two-step
and waltz dance" have petitions in the
field to overcome the strength of the
tango artists. Final judgment will
not be passed until the Forestry club
meets again.
SENIOR MARINE ENGINEERS
WILL HOLD FIRST BANQUET
Quarterdeck, the senior marine en-
gineering society, will hold its first
banquet of the year at the Union at
6:00 o'clock, tomorrow evening. H. L.
Iewis, chief engineer of the mechan-
ical laboratory, will speak on "En-
gines." L. C. Campbell, '14E, and Louis
A. Baer, will speak.
DETRO1T MASON TO SPEAK
TO CRAFTSMEN AT BANQUET
Hon. F. B. Stevens, of Detroit, thir-
ty-third degree Mason, will be the
principal speaker at the annual
Craftsmen banquet, which is schedul-
ed for 6:30 o'clock Saturday evening,
December 13, at the Masonic Temple.
Tickets may be obtained from W. H.
Gordon, '15M, F. S. Rosenthal, '14L, E.
W. Conover, '14E, H. R. Hildebrandt,
'1511, E. C. Luebben, -'15, and H. H.
Jackson, '16D.r

Michigan's chances. for developing
one, two and four mile teams for the
annual Penn relay games are said to
be the best in many seasons. Trainer
Farrell has all but one member of
last year's title-holding two-mile quar-
tet, and a wealth of younger material
to fill out the other teams.
Although "Hap" Haff, last year's
Wolverine leader, has been on the
Varsity track team for three years and
is not eligible for dual meets or the
intercollegiate championships, the star
quarter miler is eligible for, the relay
carnival events.
Haff finished for the two mile team
last spring, doing the half in a little
over 1:56, while Jansen, Brown and
Haimbaugh did nearly as well. Haim-
baugh is the only member of the team
not eligible this season, but as the 880
is a little out of the two miler's line,
it is anticipated that several suitable
youngsters can be found to take his
place. Carver, Griest, Ufer and Mur-
phy are all possibilities for the vacant
berth.
Quarter milers are about the scarc-
est article at Michigan this year, and
as a consequence both Haff and Jan-
sen, intercollegiate point winners in
the 440 last year, may be shifted to
the mile team, should one be taken
east. Lyttle and Lamey will likely
try for this team.
Trelfa, Fox, Richards,Brown,Young,
Watts, and Shapero are among the
most promising distance men from
which Farrell hopes to pick four mil-
ers who can again win the classic four
mile race,-in which Michigan holds the
record..
FRESH TRACK CANDIDATES
TO GET TOGETHER TONIGHT

Under the baton of Leopold Stokow-
ski, the famous Polish conductor, and
assisted by Thaddeus Rich, violinist,
the Philadelphia Orchestra will give
the second concert of the Choral Un-
ion series, this evening at 8:00 o'clock
in Hill auditorium. This organization
stands in the very forefront of the
world's orchestras, and under its
famous conductor has made an envia-
ble record in its home city and
throughout the country.
The following program will be ren-
dered:
Symphony No. 5, E minor, Op. 64 ..
..................... Tschaikowsky
I. Andante. Allegro con anima.
I1. Andante cantabile, con alcuna
licenza.
III. Valse. Allegro moderato.
IV. Finale. Andante maestoso.
Concerto in D. minor, for violin and
orchestra, Op. 22 .... Wieniawski
I. Allegro moderato.
H. Romanze.
II. A la Zingara.
Thaddeus Rich
Overture and Venusberg music from
"Tannhauser" (Paris version) ...
..........................Wagner
Y. M. C. A. SPEAKER TALKS
TO 50 STUDENTS SUNDAY
"Going Down" was the subject of the
address delivered by Lincoln McCon-
nell, at the men's meeting in the Ma-
jestic theatre, Sunday evening. He de-
scribed the power of mental sugges-
tion and gave several humorous illus-
trations. More than 500 attended the
service, given under the auspices of
the Y. M. C. A.
Many New Books Added to Library
During the first three weeks of No-
vember, 160 new books were added
to the university library. Among the
more important books are 11 on -dif-
ferent economic subjects, four books
on journalism and newspaper work.
Fully a third of the books are written
in German.

The first fencing tournament of the
year between the University club, a
faculty organization, and the Michi-
gan Fencer's club, held yesterday af-
ternoon at Waterman gymnuasium, re-
sulted in a victory for the faculty men
in the foils, by a score of 8 to 1, while
the students won in duelling swords,
4 to 2.
In the foils match, J. R. Hayden,
Rene Talamon and S. P. Lockwood de-
feated Carl Mattson, '15E, Julius Mar-
tinek, '14E, and E. R. Theiss, '16. Matt-
son and Theiss won over Hayden and
Talamon in duelling swords. All of
the matches were closely contested,
most of them being won by one touch.
The next match will be held next.Mon-
say.
TO ELECT VARSITY
MANAGERS IN JUNE
Varsity baseball and track manag-
erial elections will be held the second
Saturday before the final examinations
in June hereafter, according to a
change in the athletic association con-
stitution, adopted at a meeting of the
board of directors yesterday after-
noon.
The matter of holding these elec-
tions in the spring, instead of in the
fall as heretofore, has been under con-
sideration for a week, and yesterday
met with the approval of the board
members. The action is taken as a
result of the recent agitation over the
disfranchisement of freshmen, as it is
felt that first 'year men will be well
qualified to vote for candidates for
these offices after a residence in the
university of over a semester, the
same as they are well qualified to vote
in the regular January elections.
The point was also raised that the
outgoing seniors will be able to vote
in the track and baseball elections if
they are held in the spring, and a more
representative vote can be obtained.
iICHIGAN PLAY-WRTERS
WILL TRY FOR CASH PRIZE
Five hundred dollars in cash has
been offered by the management of the
Princess theatre, of New York, for the
best one-act play written by any stu-
dent in several of the leading eastern
institutions specifically named in the
offer. The manager of the Comedy
club wrote yesterday, to New York, re-
questing that Michigan be included in
the offer. An answer is expected in a
few days.
Several of the students who sub-
mitted manuscripts in the competition
conducted by the Comedy club this
fall, have already signified their in-
tention of trying for the prize.
Daily Feature Used by Japaese Paper
"The Michigan Daily for Michigan"
series is being used by the Japanese
American, a Japanese newspaper pub-
lshed in San Francisco. .

"It taks the average English or
American child 1,000 hours more to
learn to spell than the average Ger-
man, and 1,500 hours more than the
average Italian child," was the state-
nent made yesterday by Mr. Henry
Gallup Paine, editor of the Simplified
Spelling Bulletin and office manager
of the Simplified Spelling Board. Mr.
Paine arrived in Ann Arbor Monday
and will leave tonight.
"The adoption of simplified spelling
in our schools," continued Mr. Paine,
"would shorten the school life of ev-
ery child from one to two years.
"There are three main arguments in
favor of the adoption of simplified
spelling. It is, first of all, a saver of
time and space, and, when taken in
the aggregate,.this is a matter of con-
siderable importance. In the second
place, it is the reasonable and scien-
tific way to spell. There is no reason
why spelling should not conform to the
rules of reason and logic as well as
mathematics. Finally, by shortening
the time necessary to learn a mere
tool to knowledge, more tim could be
spent on the acquiring of Aowledge
itself.
"At present we are trying only to
make spelling more uniform by apply-
ing the laws of analogy, and by drop-
ping silent letters. We want people
to get used to the appearance of words
spelled in this way. After all, the on-
ly test is intelligibility.
"More than 100 members of your
faculty, nearly 300 magazines and pub-
lications, and several college presi-
dents are converts to simplified spell-
ing, and the numbers are growing ev-
ery day."
When asked whether the transition
would make much confusion, Mr.
Paine said, "There can be no more
confusion than we have now, and the
simple way will be no more confusing
than our present complicated system."
Mr. Paine, who is one of the fore-
most authorities' in the United States'
on this subject, is traveling in thei
middle west in the interests of the
Simplified Spelling Board. H will
leave for Chicago tonight.
German Club Chooses New President

TWO STUDENTS
ESCAPE FINES
IN RT TRIAL
On Recommendation of City Offic
Two Alleged Rioters Are
Freed-Other Two
Fined.
J. S. GREEN AND I. S. OLSON
MERELY LECTURED BY JUD
l). B. Newton, Third Student Aen:
as Result of Penn Game Riot,
Fined $25.
Upon recommendation of Chief
Police J. T. Kenny and Mayor R.
M~acKenzie, J. S. Green, '17E, and I.
Olson, '16L, two of the students
raigned for trial in the circuit co
yesterday on a charge of riot, were
leased from custody.. D. B. Newt
'17, and John Carmody were fined
each, which they paid.
These cases arose out of the alle
rioting which occurred in front
the Whitney theatre, during the ce
bration following the Pennsylvai
game on the night of November 15.
When the case was called, Attort
Arthur Brown, asked leave to wi
draw the pleas of "not guilty"
Newton and Carmody. The co
granted the request and the two ent
ed pleas of "guilty."
Attorney Brown then addressed t
court, and speaking on behalf
Green and Olson, requested that t
charges against them be dismissed.
"Their classmates have paid n
money for settling the damages," sE
Attorney Brown. "These bills ha
been paid with one exception, whic
am now investigating. I have talk
with the officers, and they are willi:
that further proceedings against Gre
and Olson be discontinued. They we
members of a large crowd, and inn
cent of participation in any overt ac
Prosecutor Burke suggested th
Green and Olson state the nature
.their participationin the riot, and a
cordingly they were called. Both
gretted that they were present at t
scene of the trouble.
Chief Kenny was called on and st
ed that Attorney Brown had express
the views of the police department a:
they were willing to withdraw th
complaints. Mayor MacKenzie cc
curred in this statement.
Judge E. D. Kinne then delivered t
opinion of the court, part of which fo
lows:
"The subject matter of this prosec
tion, from every angle, is a lamental
affair. There is no controversy b
tween the town and the gown. The
is as much regret and indignati
with the university authorities,
with the general public. Undoubted
the great body of students now atten
ing the university are there for e
nest and conscientious work. Unfc
tunately the wayward, the lawless, t
rowdy and the outlaw, are omnipr
ent.
"Such Proceedings would be a sca
dal and a disgrace to the most unciv
ized hamlet in the country. Genero
allowance should be made for yout
ful exuberance, but when, witha
provocation, the rights of property'a
disregarded, the authorities of the ci
and the fundamental laws of the st
are all set at defiance, and human 1
imperiled, it is high time for gover
mental action.
"The people of this state are n
willing and do not intend to be tax
to support and educate desperado

It is possibl-e that in the past the mi
nicipal authorities have been too lei
ient. Be that as it may, I now, for t
future sound a note of warning.
"The regulations and laws of th
community will hereafter be respect
and obeyed, and whether the pleadin
come from above or below, malefE
tors will receive their swift and me

Michigan's 1914 track season will be
formally opened this evening in the
trophy room of Waterman .gymnasium
at 7:15 o'clock, when all freshmen in-
terested in track affairs will gather in
the annual "pep" meeting.
The youngsters will be addressed by
Trainer "Steve" Farrell, Director P. G.
Bartelme, Intramural Director Floyd
A. Rowe, and Captain Kohler, of the
Varsity track team.
The outlook for the All-Fresh track
team will be canvassed, and an at-
tempt made to arouse sufficient inter-
est to bring out all available material
for the yearling squad.
In addition to the handicap inter-
class meet, and the annual Varsity
meets, it is probable that at least one
dual meet, both indoors and outdoors,
will be arranged for the freshmen, if
sufficient material to warrant the com-
petition comes out.

William J. Hiller, '15, was clected ited punishment."
president of the Deutscher Verein last
night, at a regular meeting of Former Michigan Daily Man is in
the society. Thirty-seven students George W. Beadle, '04, a fo
were elected to membership: 24 wom- Michigan Daily man, now represe:
en and 13 men. The resignation filed the Inlander, was in Ann Arbor
by.Lawrence Clayton, '15, president of terday. Mr. Beadlle was on the
the organization was formally accept- when Uan McGugin, at present (
ed. Several committees were also ap- of Vanderbilt University, was bus
pointed. matager of the paper.

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