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December 07, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

1L

nigan

10

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r

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, DECEM BER 7, 1913.

PRICE FI

'I,

ENRY HURWITZ TO ADDRESS
MENORA R MEETING TONIGHT.

Makes

The Michigan Menorah society will
hold an important public meeting this
evening at 8:00 o'clock in Newberry
hall. Henry Hurwitz, of Harvard
University, president of the Intercol-
legiate Menorah Association,will speak
on "The Nature and Purpose of the
Menorah Movement in American Col-
leges and Universities."
President Hutchins will address
the meeting on behalf of the universi-
ty. In addition, Professors Wenley,
Sanders, and Sharfman will speak,
respectively, on "Horizons," "Meno-
rah Activity as an Aid to Biblical
Study," and "Loyalty." Nathan M.
Kaufman, '16L, accompanied by Wil-
liam H. Altman, '14E, will render

RICE IS STRONG
FOR WESTERNERS
Michigan Ranks first with Three Men
on His All-American
Eleven.

Detroit Mlanufacturer Submits
to Regents to Employ
Job-Seekers.

Plans

BRIVI{LEY IS ONLY

EASTERNER I IS FATHER OF FIRST YEAR MAN

OFFERS PLANT TO
EMPLOY STUDENTS

Grantland Rice, the poet-sport writ-
er, has picked an All-American, which
from its fairness, is recognized as an
excellent selection of players for an
honorary team.
Mr. Rice has placed three Michigan

Plans for opening a factory, giving
employment to students at Michigan
in the near future, were laid before
the board of regents, in a letter sent
by L. D. Smith. owner of the Detroit
Fireless Stove company. Smith is the

0
ENCED

WRESTLERS BEGIN TRAIMING
FOR CHAMPIONSHIP MATCHES
Under the direction of Heavyweight
Champion Lichtner, the Varsity foot-
ball player, Michigan's wrestlers com-
menced active training yesterday for
the annual campus championship
bouts, scheduled for the fore part of
the second semester. Assisting Licht-
ner are Watson, runner-up to the
champion, and Champ, the lightweight
title holder of the university.
Followers of the sport have started
an agitation for outside competition
for the university grapplers, but un-
less some official support for their
movement develops, the possibilities of
any title matches are considered slim.
Nevertheless the interest in wrestling
this year is proving far greater than
ever before.
TO HOLD TRYOUTS
FOR OPERA CAST
Sixteen Speaking Parts to Be Filled
With Many Candidates in
the Field.
POSTER MEN MEET TOMORROW

rill Pledge
Paid

NOT ACC

RUMORS AS
SCHEDULE

men on his eleven, selecting more I fatter of Clark D. Smith, '17. The ac-

"Kol Nidre" on

the violin.

t halls will be erected
needs of the women of
Plans for two are al-
l, and a campaign for
the other has been
Detroit association of
ae. Work of wrecking
on Maynard street for
1 of the first hall will
The contract for the
that it will be com-
?r 1, 1914.
halls are made possi-
.e donation, amounting
made by former Sec-
avy Truman H. New-
ier, John F., and his
ry B. Joy, of Detroit,
elen Handy Newberry,
tier. The other donor
either his name, nor
his contribution be
he incomes from these
: the support of the
rent of the Women's

K.S.INUI, '06 WILL
SPEAK TOMORROW
Noted Orator and Hunmorist to Talk
on "The Japanese and
California."
WILL BE GUEST OF REGENT EAL
The next number on the program of
the Oratorical association is a lecture
at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow evening in
University hall, on "The Japanese and
California" by Kiyo Sue Inui, '06, gen-
eral secretary of the Japanese Associ-
ation of America, vice-president and
oratorical delegate of the Great Lakes
International Arbitration Society, and
famous lyceum lecturer, traveler and
humorist.
Mr. Inui's successful career as an
orator began in 1906, when he won the

players from the Wolverine institution
of learning than from any other col-
lege. Incidentally not a Yale man is
given a place.
Mr. Rice's choice of men follows:
Center-Des Jardiens, Ckicago.
Right Guard-Allmendinger, Michi-
gan.
Left Guard-Leonardson, Michigan
Aggies.
Right Tackle-Pontius, Michigan
Left Tackle--Butler, Wisconsin.
Right End-Rockne, Notre Dame
Left End-Wagner, Pittsburg:
Quarterback-Dorais, Notre Dame.
Right Half--Craig, Michigan.
Left Half-Norgren, Chicago.
Fullback-Brickley, Harvard.
H. I. Haskins, '11, Married in Saginaw
The marriage of Harold I. Haskins,
'11, and Ann H. Hanchett, was cele-
brated at Saginaw on Friday, Decem-
her 5, at the home of the bride's grand-
mother. Mr. Haskins was a member
of the Chi Psi fraternity, and of many
campus organizations. V
COMEDY CLUB HAS
POSTPONED SHOW

tion is a response to the working stu-
dents' campaign committee, which, in
cooperation with the Ann Arbor civic
association, is trying to bring to this
city a factory which will furnish em-
ployment to stndents during odd
hours.
The Detroit business man intends to
move his stove factory to Ann Arbor,
if the scheme meets the approval of
the board. A sales office will be es-
tablished in connection with the plant,
and students may allot a fixed portion
of their time to work in it. The owner
of the factory believes that no article
offers profit, or sale possibilities, bet-
ter than the electrical goods, which
are sold on the "money back if not
satisfied" basis.
rwo other local concerns have sub-
mitted plans to the working students'
committee to use studeut help in their
factories. Regularity of time of work
in the factories is the chief difficulty
in the plans offered, as students ex-
pect to drop their work during exam-
ination days.
M' CONNELL WILL
LECTURE TONIGHT

Cast tryouts for the 1914

Union

e on residence
steps to aid the
push forward
hird edifice. It
butors, and call
riptions. The
f 1912 pledged
's in individual
Women of the
g requested by

opera will be held Thursday night.
There are 16 speaking parts to be fill-
ed, and from the number of men who
ark in the field the eliminating will
be especially difficult. Many of the
men who played speaking roles in
Contrarie Mary will be back, but sev-
eral other positions will be open to
new talent.
Tryouts for the chorus positions
will not be held until after Christmas.
It is probable that the number of cho-
rus men will be made smaller than
last year, and that a greater amount
will be spent on the costuming.
All Union members who are inter-
ested in the poster contest for the
opera should meet at the Michigan Un-
ion at 7:00 o'clock tomorrow night.
At this meeting, the men will learn
the name of the show, and its plot will
be explained. As in previous contests,
a prize of $10.00 will be offered for
the most suitable drawing for. adver-
tising purposes. Second and third
prizes will also be awarded.
0. H. L. WERNICKE TO SPEAK
ON UNION PROGRAM TODAY

At the next luncheon given by the
women of the senior class, subscrip-
tion blanks will be distributed, and
pledges of $5 to be paid in full a year
from now, or $1 each year for five
years, will be solicited. This sub-
scription entitles the donor to a cou-
pon, granting her the use of the dor-
mitory in the future, at reasonable
transient rates.
Every woman is requested to use
her influence during the Christmas
vacation to interest her relatives and
friends in the campaign, and to come
back prepared to contribute something
toward the fund. Treasurers will be
appointed from the several classes to
take charge of the subscriptions.
DIRECTOR ROWE PLANS FOR
BIG HANDICAP TRACK MEET
Contest Will Take Place in February
and Is Arranged Primarily
For "Dubs."
Floyd A. Rowe, director of intramu-
ral activities, announced yesterday his
latest innovation for interclass con-
tests. His newest plans call for a
handicap meet, to be held sometime
in the middle of February and intend-
ed for those athletes heretofore com-
monly designated as "dubs." Neither
Varsity men, nor meinbers of the var-
sity squad will be allowed to compete
and a special effort will be made to
enter those men who have never be-
fore taken any part in either Varsity
or interclass athletics.
The meet will not be entirely con-
fined to track and field events but will
also include competition in gymnastic

Northern Oratorical League contest
against the competition of Chicago,
Wisconsin, Minnesota, Northwestern,
Iowa and Oberlin universities at Ober-
lin. Although the audience was in-
structed not to applaud, and it did not
until Mr. Inui spoke, it broke out in
spontaneous applause at his brilliant
oratory before he had spoken five min-
utes.
While in Ann Arbor, Mr. Inui will
ithe guest of Regent J. L. Beal and
l fessor T. C. Trueblood of the Ora-
tory department.
exercises. The object in including
the latter will be to enable those men
t , compete, who have shown profieie.4-
c in the various gymnastic feats.
'he meet, according to the ten-
tative plans already outlined by Di-
iector Rowe, will be strictly a han-
dicap affair, the handicaps to be de-
termined by means of trials held dur-
ing the week previous to the holding
of the final events. The meet is to be
open to every male student of the uni-
versity and Director Rowe intends to
take personal charge of entering from
two to three hundred men in the va-
rious events. -It has not yet been de-
termined whether awards will be giv-
en the winners of the various events.

After a week of correspondence and
negotiations, the management of the
Comedy club has finally succeeded ini
having the date of the producton of
the "Scare row' 'h iged to,-Friday,
January 16. This was only made pos-
sible by an agreement between Man-
ager Lane of the Whitney theatre and
Klaw and Erlanger company, of New
York, whereby "The Lure," one of the
K. and E. productions, has been shift-
ed from the 16th to the 17th.
Several things contributed to make
the postponement necessary, but chief
among these were the delays incident
to the shipment of the new scenery,
and the unforeseen difficulties in whip-
ping the new material into shape. The
properties are expected almost any
time, and when they arrive will be
put to immediate use. Especially in
the first act it becomes almost imper-
ative to the progress of the play that
the proper stage effects be used during
the rehearsals. .
The task of coaching and training
the newly selected cast is now at its
most difficult stage. The different plans
of stage business for every small scene
faust be worked out to the smallest
detail.

"Dead Lions" will be the subject of
the lecture of Lincoln McConnell at
6:30 o'clock tonight at the Majestic
theatre, under the auspices of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A. McConnell is a
famous southern lecturer who is mak-
ing a tour of the north under the
management of the Redpath Lyceum
Bureau. His lecture will be an inspir-
ational address based on a biblical
story. It is Mr. McConnell's oldest
lecture having been delivered more
than 500 times, and as many as three
times in one year to the same audi-
ence.
As a humorist and impersonator
McConnell is even more famous than
as a preacher. He has also been a
cowboy, and for several years held a
position as a police detective in Atlan-
ta, Georgia, where he is now pastor
of the largest church.
Tonight's meeting will open at 6:10
o'clock with motion pictures which
will run until Mr. McConnell's address
at 6:30.
Two More Peace Orations Submitted
Two more manuscripts of orations
for the Peace contest have been filed
with the oratory department. They
are: "The Leaders in World Peace,"
by B. J. Jonkman, '14L, and "The
Common People, Champions of Peace,"
by D. A. Graham, '16.

Several Musical Numbers Have
Been Secured. "Ike" Fisher
Will Play.

Also

Director Bartelme Is Endeavorhi
Complete Arrangements For
1914 Sehedule in
- Near Future
WINDY CITY ALUMNI WANT
PENN GAME PLAYED TH
One Report is that Five Game Coni
Has Been Signed With
Princeton.
Various rumors relative to M
gan's 1914 football schedule, cur
on the campus and treated in the
ropglitan press, have been bra
unfounded by a blanket denial is
by Director Bartelme of the Mich
athletic association.
"I don't know where all these
ports originate," stated Director I
telme, "but they are entirely wit
foundation. I intend to complete
1914 schedule just as soon as poss
in order to suppress false reports
ative to next year's opponents."
One of the rumors which has ga-
a foothold in metropolitan newspa
intimates that Michigan has sign
five year football contract with Pri
ton, two games to be played in .
Arbor, two in Princeton, and on
Chicago.
That there is a possibility of M
igan meeting Pennsylvania in Ch
go next season is the purport of a
ond report.
According to reports the Univer
of Michigan alumni of Chicago
making an organized effort to
the 1914 Michigan-Pennsylvania f
ball game staged in the Windy Cit
No doubt the Chicago alumni b
considered asking for the opportu
of seeing the Michigan team in act
but the idea that such a game as
Wolverine-Quaker contest can be
ranged is scouted by those in to
with the athletic situations at the
universities.
According to the plan of alterna'
games, Michigan is due to play P
at Franklin field, Philadelphia, x
fall. Even if the Michigan authori
were willing to play in Chicago, i
doubtful if the Pennsy managen
would consent to the game being t
en away from Franklin field.
A third rumor deals with the p
ability of a Harvard-Michigan ga
According to dispatches from C
bridge, Holy Cross and probably
other college will be ropped f'
the Crimson schedule. At the s
time it is stated that an effort is b
made to place the annual Yale-I
yard battle a week later next sea
This will give Harvard probably t
vacant dates to fill, and it is
Michigan and Virginia are being
sidered.
ASPIRANTS TO FRESH TRACK
TEAM MEEET TUESDAY NI
All freshmen interested in track
letics will have an opportunity
show their "pep" Tuesday ever
whenta meeting of first year track
pirants is called for 7:15 in thet
phy room of Waterman gymnasiu
This meeting, which has come. t
an annual affair, is for the benefi
the yiungsters entirely. Plans fo
All-Fresh track team will be consi
ed, and the prospects for the se
will be talked over. Trainer "St
Farrell, Director P. G. Bartelme,
tramural Director Floyd A. Rowe,
Captain "Tiny" Koliler will addr
the freshmen.

Among the popular speakers to ap-
pear on programs at the Union, is Mr.
0. H. L. Wernicke of Grand Rapids,
who will- speak at 3:00 o'clock today.
Mr. Wernicke has thereputation of be-
ing the foremost factory organizer in
the United States. He is president of
the Macey sectional bookcase company
of Grand Rapids, and is a member of
the Jackson prison board. In his talk
today, he will deal with, "The College
Student in Business."
Gerald Strong, '15D, will furnish vi-
olin selctions accompanied by "Ike"
Fisher. C. W. Ferguson, '15L, will
play on the violin, and the Varsity
quartet has promised some numbers.
Graham Taylor, of Chicago, who is
well known by previous lectures in
Ann Arbor will be next Sunday's
speaker. He is the founder and head
of the Chicago Commons, one of the
oldest social settlements. He is one
of the editors of the Survey, and is.
prominent in other social work.
President Hutchins to Talk in Detroit.
President Harry B. Hutchins will
attend the luncheon of the University
of Michigan club in Detroit, Wednes-
day evening, at the Edelweiss cafe. He
will deliver the address of the evening.

Presbyterian Church

Corner Huron and
Division Street

LEONARD A. BARRETT, MINISTER

10:30 A. 11. "The Master's Charge to the Dis-
ciples."

7:45 P. M.-

Frank W. Gunsaulus.

I Union Guild

Series

DrF

Fran.

. unsaus

PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH

T4

ht

Of Chicago, Illinois.

7

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