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December 05, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

J F RAAIZO)M TOFSE

ATTACK OF FORMER STU1)ENT
Resolution Censuring Offender Will
IO Be Ptiblished in Celery
{City.
DDAY efinite action concerning the at-
tack made upon the university by
Wallace B. Blood, formerly of the '15
f His lit class, in The Kalamazoo Advocate,
'ri dge recently, was taken by the Kalamazoo
club at its meeting held last night at,
the Union. Members of the club dep-
recated severely the attitude taken by
S; IS Blood as a former student of the uni-
MEMBER versity and member of the Kalama-
zoo club, and a committee, consisting
Regarding of Lester Rosenbaum, '14, and 0. Z.
Yli jIde, '15L, was appointed to draw up
resolutions censuring him for his
statements, which membeis of the
on-Davies, club believe are grossly exaggerated.
Leliver an Copies of the resolutions are to be
f Interna- sent to The Michigan Daily, and to
noon, De- the newspapers of Kalamazoo.
in room The sending of The Michigan Daily
Langdon_ to Kalamazoo College, the Western
of arts State Normal School and Kalamazoo
, where High school was authorized. The club
ege boat, also decided to take a page in the
v 'theMichiganensian-

IdeasI
Treaitlne

tngd
ill d
:Ct o
after
lock,
Mr.
er
:rsity
coll
denc
high
ate i
lis de

;y oi LI
est honor
s eligible,
gree with

he has been a
and writer. He is
;eful man of thirty-
:husiasm for the
as about peace and
he readers of Nor-
at Illusion" know
Li speak from first
.f the present situ-
of Europe, in the
, which are based
a sentimental or
n. but from the

RED, CROSS, SEALS.
TO BE SOLD TODAY
Committee Will Place 10,000 Stamps
Used in Tuberculosils Fight
on Market.

ARE

NOT GOOD AS

POSTAGEI

Davies comes to the Unit-
y the courtesy of the Gar-
tion, which is one of the
sting peace organizations
the directors of which are
n. Arthur Balfour, former-
inister, Lord Esher of the
of Imperial Defense, Mr.
gell, and Sir Richard Car-
ip through the United Stat-
made under the auspices"
'ican Association for Inter-
ncilliation, where he fol-
>r de'Estournelles de Con-
rance and Baroness Von
Austria as visiting lectur-
aopolitan club will enter-
ngdon-Davies at a dinner
ir at Newberry hall at 6:00
owing his lecture. Pres-
B. Hutchins and Profes-
eeves will be present as

Red Cross Christmas seals will be
placed on sale in Ann Arbor today.
Drug stores, postal stations, hospitals,
and Christian associations will handle
them. Dr. Jeanne C. Solis, is conduct-
ing the work for the fourth time and
has appointed seven assistants. The
initial allotment is 20,000, and half
that amount are ready for distribu-
tion.
The seal is used only as a sticker
on the back of mail matter, and is not
good for postage. Each one sold
brings a small revenue to 'the local
and state societies, engaged in the
1Stt AMERICAN ED
ARE YOU LTS1NG THESE?
campaign against tuberculosis.
The committee expects to exceed
last year's results, when $550 was re-
alized by marketing the stamps. In
case the percentage of the proceeds
proves sufficient, a visiting nurse will
be added to the force at work in
Washtenaw county.
WILL HAVE NO OBJECTION
TO SIMPLIFIED SPELLYNG
Mr. Otto C. Marckwardt, instructor
in rhetoric, in speaking to the fresh-
man engineers yesterday afternoon
about simplified spelling, said that
they should not confound simplified
spelling with misspelling, but that if
any students in his classes desired to
use simplified spelling, he had no ob-
jection.
As Mr. Marckwardt is not a "signer
of the promis," this statement will
be considered important by the advo-
cates of spelling reform, as there are
probably many more like him. Among'
the 200 or more "signers of the prom-
is" in Ann Arbor, there are nearly 100
professors and instructors of the uni-
versity.

TO TEACH ADVISEES
CAMPUS ACTIVITIES
In order that their freshmen advis-
ees may better understand the nature
of the various campus activities, the
senior advisors decided yesterday to
hold an "information meeting" some
time early in January. Representa-
tives of the various organizations will
be asked to deliver five minute talks,
setting forth the character and pur-
poses of the different institutions, and
explaining how new men may enter
the various fields of activity.
Dean J. R. Effinger addressed the
meeting and expressed his satisfaction
with the work and his expectations
for the future. That the advisory sys-
tem was being felt outside of Ann Ar-
bor was shown by Prof. C. O. Davis,
the chairman of the faculty committee.
He stated that he had received let-
ters from several other colleges, ask-
ing for details of the Michigan system,
and that notes of appreciation had
been received from the fathers of sev-
eral of the freshmen.
Prof. M. P. Tilley, of the faculty
committee, called upon several of the
seniors to tell some of their experi-
ences with the freshmen, and to make
any suggestions which had occurred
to them.
FACULTY MAN WILL LECTURE
BEFORE EVANGELICAL CHURCH
Prof. Warren W. Florer, of the Ger-
man department, will lecture before
the Brotherhood of the German Evan-
gelical church at 8:00 o'clock this ev-
ening. He will speak on the resolu-
tion recently adopted by the German
national council, according to which,
this church decided to take official hc-
tion, in working with the German so-
cieties in America, to awaken interest
in German culture and study.
Alleged Rioters to Be Tried Today..
Daniel B. Newton, '17, J. S. Green,
'17E, L S. Olson, '16L, and John Car-
mody, of Detroit, who were arrested
during the riot on Main street the
night of the Pennsylvania game, will
be tried in the circuit court before
Judge E. D. Kinne on a charge of riot
this morning at 9:00 o'clock. Attor-
ney Arthur Brown will appear as
counsel for the defense and Prosecu-
tor George J. Burke will represent the
state.
Bridge Will Occupy Union Loungers
The second round of the Union
bridge tournament will be played at
the weekly lounger tonight. Those
who have entered and did not play in
the first round may start tonight with-
out being handicapped, inasmuch as
the scoring will be done on the aver-
age basis, a minimum number of
rounds being necessary to qualify. The
playing will probably extend over
three months.
Two Pharmie Classes Elect Officers
At a recent election, made necessary
because of the ineligibility of several
office holders, the senior pharmics
chose E. H. Woodhouse for secretary;
R. Smith, historian and C. A. Madden,;
sergeant at arms.
A reelection in the freshman phar-
mic class, made necessary by the same
causes, resulted in the selection of H.
E. Weaver, president, and W. E. Feek,
treasurer.
Faculty Man Writes Booster Pamphlet
Assistant Professor J. R. Nelson, of
the engineering department, furnish-
ed the copy for the pamphlet, which]
the Ann Arbor civic association has

published to boost the city. The book-
lets, which have about 30 views, may
now be had at the bookstores for 20;
cents.

SAYS YOST SHOULD
SELECT BIG TEAM
Fielding H. Yost has the best right
to choose the mythical All-American
eleven this year, according to James
R. Crowell of the New York Telegram.
Crowell says, that unless a man has
seen the teams of both the western
and eastern sections in action, it is
useless for him to attempt an All-
American selection.
In addition to the western teams,
Yost has watched the play of most of
the best eastern elevens, including
Yale and Harvard, and on these
grounds, Crowell says that Yost's All-
American should be of the greatest
interest to sport followers.
In regard to the relative strength
of the eastern and western teams, he
says that in more than one instance
this year, it has been shown that west-
ern football had a visible edge on the
eastern style of play. The Army's vic-
tory over the Navy is cited as a proof
of this statement since it was the be-
wildering western system of attack
taught by Yost and used by the ca-
dets, that demolished the much touted
sailors.
COMMUNICATION.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Whereas, Wallace B. Blood, a form-
er student of the University of Michi-
gan and member of this organization
has maligned the university by his
grossly exaggerated article recently
published in the Kalamazoo Advocate
and,
Whereas, we are certain that his ar-
ticle was not written in a spirit of
unbiased criticism nor founded upon
definite facts, therefore be it hereby
Resolved, That this organization go
on record as deprecating the attitude
shown by the said Wallace B. Blood
as entirely unwarranted and unworthy
of a former student of this university,
and member of this organization, aid
be it further
Resolved, That copies of these res-
olutions be sent to the said Wallace
1. Blood, to The Michigan Daily, and
to all the newspapers of Kalamazoo.
(Signed)
The Kalamazoo Club of the Univer-
sity of Michigan.
LESTER F. ROSENBAUM, '14.
o. Z. IDE, '15L.
Committee.
M1U'ST SEN) ANNOUNCEMENTS
TO NEWS EDITOR THIS NOON
All announcements to appear in
next week's bulletin must be in the
hands of university news editor, Prof..
J. R. Brumm before noon today. The
copy must either be placed in the news
editor's box, in University hall, or be
given Professor Brumm.
The bulletin is issued every Satur-
day morning, and distributed around
the campus, and any organization.
recognized by the university authori-
ties, may avail themselves of this op-
portunity.
JOUR ALISSTIC FRATERNITY
ELECTS SEVEN NEW MEMBERS

NO MORE INVESTIGATION IS
MADE BY FACULTY ON IJOT
Student Council Continues Work of
Obtaining Evidence For
Some Cases.
No investigations of charges of r-
oting or disorderly conduct the night
of the Pennsylvania game, are being
conducted by the university faculties
at present. Action has been taken on
all cases probed, and unless new
charges develop, no more investiga-
tions will be made.
The student council is still contin.
uing its work of obtaining evidence.
Several cases were dismissed at its
last meeting, because of the insufli-
ciency of the evidence, but new facts
brought to light, has resulted in a
search for individuals whose descrip-
tions are known, but whose names re-
main unrevealed.
Michigamna to Enjoy "Rabbit Hunt."
Michigamua will enjoy its annual
"rabbit hunt" tomorrow. The event.
which is traditional in its history, tak-
es the form of an outing at Whitmore
Lake.
WILL LECTURE ON
RACIAL PROBLEM
Oriental Graduate to Speak Upon
:Japanese in California
Monday.
WAS IICHIGAN'S HONOR ORATOR
Kiyo Sue Inui, '06, the well known
Japanese lecturer, writer, journalist,
and traveler will speak on the pro-
gram of the Oratorical association in
University Hall, at 8:00 o'clock Mon-
day evening, December 8, on the Jap-
anese-California situation. As gner-
al secretary of the Japan ese associa-
tion of America with headquarters in
San Francisco, he is a widely quoted
authority on this subject.
While at Michigan, Mr. Inui was
first president of the Cosmopolitan
club, and honor orator in 1906, when
he won the Northern Oratorical
League contest. He has recently com-
pleted a lecture tour around the world
in the interests of international peace.
representing the Great Lakes Interna-
tional Arbitration society of Detroit
as its vice-president. On this trip, he
lectured in German, French, English
and his native language. Unlike most
Japanese speakers, he is very witty.
The Oratorical association has se-
cured Mr. Inui, as an extra to their
regular program, bringing him her
from Detroit where he is scheduled
to lecture seven times this week. Ad-
mission will be by rogular course tick-
ets or single admission of 50 cents.
SENIOR LIT CHRISTMAS PARTY
PASTEBOARDS ARE ON SALE
Tickets for the senior lit Christmas
party, to be held at the Michigan Un-
ion Wednesday, December 17, are on
sale, and a large number have already
been disposed of. There will be a din-
ner at 6:30 o'clock, followed by a pro-
gram and dance. Some of the decora-
tions to be used for the Union Christ-
mas celebration on Thursday will be
up in time for the 1914 functions.

J .HOP PETITION
TO GO TO I l
COMMITTEEME
[ast Year's Delegates Haae Apprq
of Sub-Committee's Plan
to Reinstate
Dance
,JIOR REPRESENTATIVES T(
DECIDE FATE OF DRAFT TO
Senate Council to Withhold Dee
Until Non-Athletic Board
Takes Action.
A petition for the re-instatemen
the Junior Hop, embodying refo
calculated to remove all objection,
Features as drawn up by its sub-c
mittee, was indorsed by the 1914
committee, at a meeting yesterday
ternoon. The petition will be pres
ed to the 1915 committee at 9
o'clock this afternoon at the Al
Delta Phi house. Junior engin
will meet at 11:00 o'clock today
elect a representative on the stu
council committee.
The 1915 committee has been cl
en by the fraternities represented
last year's Hop committee, to act
them in case the Hop is permitte
the faculty. The purpose of tod
meeting is to give the 1915 commi
a voice in the framing of the rm
which, if accepted by the senate cc
cil, will be binding upon this ye
committee. No independent has :
elected to the 1915 committee, bt
independent will probably be as
to attend today's meeting.
The senate council will not act
this petition until it has been pas
on and recommended by the nons
letic committee. Whether or naot
opinion of the student council comi
tee will be asked, depends on the
cision of the non-athletic commi
upon the presentation of the petit
The senate council will meet Mon
night.
PROFESSORS SUPPLY FIVE
STA TE LECTURES T'ONC1
Five extension lectures will be
en tonight in different pars of
state. Prof. J. R. Brum will deli
his address on "The Escape From
Commonplace," in Ortonville; P
J. S. Reeves will lecture in Alp
on "Our Complicated Ballot"; P
Aubrey Tealdi will speak in Gr
Haven on "Landscape Gardenin
Prof. R. M. Wenley will appear at
Lansing Public library, whore he i
give his talk on, "Changing Americ
Prof. H. R. Cross will speak at
Detroit Arts guild.
UNION PLANSFO
CHRISTMAS REVI
No tryouts will be held for the
of the minstrel show to b staged
the Michigan Union at the Christ

ECONOMIST WILL
WED INI CHICAGO
Mr. S. M. Hamilton, of the econom-
ics department, yesterday announced
that he is to be married to Miss Edna
Mabel Rickard of Medina, Ohio, in
Chicago, on December 13.
The wedding will be held in the
Cathedral Saints Peter and Paul, Chi-
cago, with Dean Sumner of the divini-
ty school of the university of Chicago,
ofiliciating. A reception after the wed-
ding will be held in the Chicago audi-
torium hotel immediately after the
ceremony.
Mr. Hamilton will return to Ann
Arbor with his bride, who is a Buck-
nell graduate and take temporary
quarters here for the rest of the sem-
ester. A leave of .absence for the sec-
ond semester has been granted by the
board of regents and the honeymoon
vill be spent touring Europe.
SENIOR DENT CLASS HEAD
APPOINTS THREE OMM0TTEES
Pres. W. E. Rice of the senior dent
class has appointed three standing
committees as follows: social, G. E.
Wittet, chairman, T. 1. Meyers, A. W
Farley, M. M. Scheaffer, and Miss Her-
tha C. larturg; auditing, O. Manchey,
chairman, C. 1I. Ryle, and J. A. Mot-
Iey; invitations, F. R. Jackson, chair-
imn, C. C. Schwartzbek, and J. G.
Shaffer. A cane committee will prob-
ably be appointed at the next meet-

Seven men were initiated into the
Sigma Delta Chi, national journalist-
ic fraternity, yesterday afternoon, and
Prof. J. R. Brumm was elected to hon-
orary membership. The men taken in
are as follows: Walter E. Nye, '15,
Guy Wells, '15, Reuben Peterson, Jr.,
'14, T. Hawley Tapping, '16L, Francis
F. McKinney, '16L, Bernus E. Kline,t
'14, and Oliver W. Hall, '15E. An initi-
ation banquet was held at the Michi-
gan Union last night. As the first
speaker, Prof. Fred N. Scott outlined
the scope of the fraternity~

Poster Tryouts Will Meet Monday.
All members of the Union who are
interested in the poster contest for
this year's opera, are to meet at the
Union Monday night at 7:00 o'clock.
At this time all necessary instruction
as to the methods of the contest will
be explained. The first prize offered
is $10.00, the winner to be picked by. a
committee familiar with this kind of
work.

celebration, Thursday .night, D
ber 18. Thirteen men, who are
ular as campus comedians, w
picked by the committee as in
cutor, end men and i:,embers o
chorus.
Several new piieces will be su-
the first tire, among them bein;
Wright, Play That Saxophone,
Rowland Fixel, '12-'14L. Many
ular songs will be brought int
vice, and a medley of Michigar
odies will constitute one of the
ing numbers.
Two performances of the sho
planned, with a few vaudeville
during the intermission. The
building will be decorated with
onable colors, and refreshment
be served. The ceertin"
open to all Union members u
charge.
My Land range Heet in Ann
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins.has
to go to Flint to use his influe
secure the 1914 meethiu of the
Grange for Ann Arbor. Both

ii

.

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Rest of
the Year

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