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October 04, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-04

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1913.

PRICE ]IVE

t

r BACKFIELD

I I

OPPOSE

E ELEVENI

ill Rely Upon Speed Instead
Weight Behind Heavy
Line,
IS kNOWN ABOUT
VISITING TEAM'S WEIIxT.
Meighing 14C, Will Be Light.
Fullback Ever Starting
for Michigan,.

'fetgreatest footbiallrecord of *
* any active football coach be- *
* longs to a Michigan coach. Field- *
* ing H. Yost has won 87 games
* with his Michigan teams in 12 *
S years, lost 9 and tied 7. Case *
* plays Michigan today. It is the *
* 104th game for a Yost-Michigan *
* machine. *
* You will want to know the lat. *
est about that team. -You can *
* subscribe for The Daily today *
at the tent on the campus, or at *
* the office across from the Najes- *
* tic. *
* * * * * * * * * * *
LA W FRATERNITIES COMBINE
IN N ATIONAL ORGIANIZATION
D elta Theta Phi, a national law fra-
ternity, was organized at a meeting
held at the Hotel La Salle, Chicago, re-
cently, when Lambda Phi, Alpha Kap-
pa Phi and Delta Phi Delta, letter fra-
ternity were also formed.
Theodore E. Rein, for Alpha Kappa
Phi, represented Michigan and re-
sponded td a toast at the banquet con-
cluding the two days conference.
The organization possesses a total
membership of 2,500 and has forty-one
chapters.

IILLU 141 UUIUn j

1,00 Attend

"Open House;' Membership
Soars to Total
of 2137.

GIANT RECEPTION
uin A ET |uu

INi

INFIRMARY NEWS
TO BE PUBLISHED
Booklets Explaining System Will Be
Shortly Iistributed About
Campus.
THREE PHYSICIANS IN CHARGE.

y

When Michigan meets Case this af-
ternoon, Coach Yost will send one of
the lightest backfields that ever has
represented the Maize and Blue
against the time honored first-game
opponent of the Wolverines. j
With Hughitt at quarter, Bentley at
fullback, and Catlett and Gault at the
halves, the quartet that is expected to
narch the ball over the Scientists' goal
ine several, if not innumerable, times
till average only 152 pounds. Hughitt
ips the scales at 142 pounds, Catlett at
156, Gault at 165, and Bentley at 145.
kentley is probably the lightest full-
back that has ever started a game as a
egular.
To offset Michigan's light back-
ield, Coach 'Yost has a squad of husk-
es from which to choose his linemen.
The men who were due to start today's'
mgagement average 189 from end to
nd. Torbet at left end weighs 172;
dusser, left tackle, weighs 205; Licht-
er, left guard, 171; Paterson, center,
19; Allmendinger, right guard. 198;
Pontius, right tackle, 192; and James,
ight end, 164.
Yesterday's practice consisted only
f a running over of the formations
hat will be used against the Cleve-
and eleven. The entire afternoon's
ession was spent in polishing off the
lays, with the lineup that is expected.'
o start against the visitors.
The Case. team was due to arrive
his morning by way of Detroit. Little
s known of the visiting eleven, but it
s expected its line will be much light-
r than Michigan's, and its backfield
s heavy if not heavier.
The tentative lineups of the two
levens follow:
fichaiganCase
'orbet............ L... .Boley or
Allen
usser........... L.T Diver or Zellner
ichtner.......... L.G. ..... .Perkins
aterson(Capt)... C. .Whelan(Capt.)
ilmendinger.R.....G. Byers or Wertz
ontius.........R.T..Franz
or Stanley
ames............R.E.........Kenyon
ughitt.........Q........ Parshall
atlett........... .L.H. Jenkins or
Powell
entley........... FB.B. ...Bronson
or Mitchell
ault .......:. ..R.H. .. Whitacre
or Fisher.
Referee-Ralph Hoagland, Prince-
n; umpire-Donald Henry, Kenyon;
me of quarters-15 minutes.
OUIS EICH, '12 TO INSTRUCT
EN6LISlI IN ANN ARBOR HIxH

*

* * * * * *

*

TO ORGANIZE BIG CAMPAIGN.
Michigan men to the number of 1,000
crowded into the Michigan Union last
night at the annual "open house"
marking the affair as the greatest re-
ception of the Union's greatest year.
The crowd started to assemble at
7:00 o'clock and in a short time an en-
thusiastic throng of men had filled the
large hall. Professor Robert Bunker
of the law department spoke briefly
of the scope of the university. "The
university does not consist of buildings
or a faculty," he said, "but it consists
of a great student body and an alumni
body."
The distribution of the new Michi-
gan Union song books added consider-
ably to the enthusiasm. Edward Kemp,
last year's president of the Union, led
the crowd in singing a large number
of favorites, and try-outs for cheer-
leader aroused plenty of enthusiasm
for the Case game. Cider and dough-
nuts were prevalent.
Patrick Koontz, '14, as chairman of
the reception, and Selden Dickenson,
president of the Union had general
charge of the meetting.
Membership soared again yesterday
making a total roll of 2,137 in com-
parison to a 1678 membership at the
same time last year. The house to
house canvass for members will be1
conducted next week in charge of H.
Beach Carpenter, '14. A new commit-4
(Continued on page 4.)
FRATERNITIES MAKE
HIGHER STANDINGS

Case.
Sixteen Yeears of Michigan vs.
-0-
M C
1894 18 8
1898 23 5.
1899 28 6
1900 24 6
1901 57 0
1902 48 6
1903 31 0
1904 33, 0
1905- 36 0
1906 28 0
1907 9 0
.1908 167 6
1909 3 0
1910 3 3
1911 24 0
1912 35 0
* * * * * * * * *

:*
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Pamphlets which will contain all
information concerning the new stu-
dent infirmary, were prepared yester-
day at a meeting of Doctors H. H.
Cummings, Clyde Stouffer, and L. C.
Pratt, and will be distributed among
the student body as soon as they can
be obtained from the printers. Posters
will also be printed and will be dis-
played at prominent places. These
bulletins will contain all information
as to the hours at which the dispensary
will be open, and as to the nature of
treatment which may be obtained.
Although the building for the dis-
pensary will not be completed until
about October 15, students in need of
medical attention may call on any of
the three doctors who are in charge
of the work. Students living south of
the campus are advised to call Dr..
Cummings, telephone 1349-L and make
appiontments to see him at his home,
723 Church street. Students living
north of the campus are advised to
call Dr. Stouffer, telephoneh1896, and
make appointments to see him in his
temporary offices in the old homeo-
pathic building across from Hill audi-
torium. His office hours will be from
9:00 to 12:00 and from 2:30 to 4:00.
During these hours he may be reached
by telephone through the university
exchange. University women should
call Dr. Pratt, telephone 233-J, and
(Continued on page 4.)
ALL-FRESH PLAYERS
HAVE FIRST MIX-UP

REGENTS PASS
FAVORABLE ON
EDIFICE PLAI
Board Approves Work of Arch
Albert Kahn on Drawings
For New Science
Building.
DRAW UP RESOLUTION WISHI
)R. ANGELL SPEEDY RECOY
Accept Summer School Treasw
Reports; Give Out Many
Degrees.

CHEER LEADERS TO
MAKE INITIAL BOW
The first attempt to give the com-
petitive system for selecting varsity
cheerleaders a real test, will be made
at this afternoon's game. Beginning
today, aspirants from the senior class-
es are to lead the cheering for three
games, and according to the plan
adopted last spring by the Athletic As-
sociation, the rooters are to vote for
their first and second choices at each
game. By a process of elimination, the
best are to be retained, and from these,
after the. third game, the final selec-
tions will be made.
This system takes the place of the
old methods of selection of cheer lead-
ers. The past few years men who had
won their "M" on the various teams
were asked to instill the necessary
"pep" in the rooters. This plan,
however, was not a success, with the
result that the present competitive
method was introduced.
Ballots will be included in the pro-
gram, and every rooter is requested to
signify his preference. The candidates
will be distinguished by number only,
and the voter will merely have to write
the number of his favorite in the des-
ignated place and drop the ballot in
the receptacles at the gate on the way
out. The counting of the votes will be
done by the student council.
PRES1 lE NT HUTCHINS Tuo GIVE
OPENIN Y. III. C..A LECTURE
':Pres. Harry B. Hutchins will open
the series of Sunday evening services
given under the auspices of the Y. M.
C. A. by an address to college ,men.
According to a custom the president
of the university takes this opportuni-
ty to greet the incoming class and ex-
tend a welcome to them.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the Med-
ical department is to be the speaker
the following Sunday. Noted theologi-
ans and members of the faculty will
appear during the year.
Newberry hall has been secured for
the meeting, which will commence at
6:30 o'clock.

For the school year 1912-1913 the
Kappa Beta Psi fraternity heads the
list in scholarship among the men's
general fraternities, while the Kappa
Alpha Theta sorority ranks first in the
organizations for women. In compar-
ison the sororities stand higher in
scholarship as a unit, than do the fra-
ternities. The Delta Upsilon fraterni-
ty and the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority
have maintained unusual records for
the past two years, both organizations
holding positions on the scholarship
chart well ,above the "ideal standing"
line.
The standing of the general fra-
ternities is as follows: Kappa Beta
Psi, Delta Upsilon, Delta Kappa Epsi-
lon, Acacia, Alpha Tau Omego, Alpha
Sigma Phi, Psi Upsilon, Sinfonia, Zeta
Psi, Kappa Sigma, Alpha Delta Phi,
Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, Beta The-
ta Pi, Theta Delta Chi, Phi Kappa Psi,
Zeta Beta Tau, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Gamma Del-
ta, Chi Psi, Delta Tau Delta, Phi Kap-
pa Sigma, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Del-
ta Chi.
The sororities rank as follows: Kap-
pa Kappa Gamma, Sorosis, Alpha Phi,
Chi Omega Pi Beta Phi, Gamma Phi
Beta, Delta Gamma, and Alpha Chi
Omega.
Taken all in all, the fraternities and
sororities have made a higher record
in studies for 1912-1913 than in previ-
ous years.
New Picture Theatre Will Open Soon.
Another motion picture house will
be opened to the public at 326 Main St.,
about Octotber 15, with a seating ca-
pacity of 800. Beginning next year,
vaudeville will be shown in addition to
the pictures, but at present this is
impossible, as the constrtuction of
the stage is not complete.

Picking two teams from his squad of
fifty candidates for the freshman team
and sending them through a half
hour's scrimmage yesterday afternoon,
Coach Douglas had his first opportuni-
ty to size up his men.
While the playing of both elevens, as
teams, was somewhat ragged, the
coach was satisfied with the workout.
The showing of several of the individu-
al players was such as to warrant the
belief that the yearlings will have a
strong, fairly heavy line, and a fast
backfield.
Splawn, a fullback from Dallas,
Texas, looks like a genuine find as a
kicker. .He gets his boots off quickly,
places them well, and is getting great-
er distance behind them than the var-
sity performers.
Hubel, a Menominee quarterback,
and Herbert, of Detroit, are also doing
well with the spirals.
McNamara, a halfback, and Whit-
marsh, either a half or end, are two
other men who lok likely to place.
The fight for the center promises to
be a lively one. The two leading can-
didates are evenly matched. Skinner,
of Lansing, or Nienar, of Menominee,
will hold the pivot position. The lat-
ter is a much lighter man, but is the
more accurate passer.
Patterson,,of Detroit, is showing bet-
ter than any of the other end candi-
dates, with Gratz possibly the next
best. Pierce, of Ypsilanti, and Fink-
biner, of Toledo, are playing strong
games at the tackles.
Rehor, of Hastings, the heavyweight
of the squad, looks to have the call at
one guard, but the filling of the other
is a problem. Daily scrimmages, with
frequent evening rule quizzes, will be
the order for next week, and by a
week from today it is expected the
makeup of the team will be decided.

SOPHOMORE FINED FOR PETTY
LARCENY BY JUDGE DOTY.
A colored student registered in the
second year class of the Pharmacy de-
partment was fined $5.00 and costs at
Justice Doty's court Yesterdayafter-
noon for stealing a hair brush in Daw-;
son's drug store on Huron strteet. Af-
ter pocketing the article, the student
was apprehended by Officer Kuhn of
the city police force while making his
get-away toward the campus.
NUMEROUS RACES
AMONG STUDENTS
One hundred and thirty foreign stu-
dents representing 27 different nation-
alities are registered in the several
departments of the university accord-
ing to the statistics being compiled by
the board of Advisers to Foreign Stu-
dents.
China leads with a representation of
53, while Porto Rico sends a delega-
tion of 24. Holland is represented by
12 students, and Poland by ten. South
Africa and Armenia have nine each;
but the number of Japanese has de-
creased to seven. For the first time,
Turks, Persians, and Egyptians are
enrolled Other nations represented
are Germany, India, Cuba, Hawaii,,
Scotland, Switzerland, Australia, Ar-
gentina, Bulgaria, Columbia, British
Columbia, Brazil, Russia, Canada, Ja-
maica, and the Republic of Panama.
The engineering department has the
largest of foreigners, numbering 54.
Lits rank with 36; and medic third
with 21. The dentistry department has
an enrollment of 11 foreigners, while
these departments of law and pharma-
cy have four each.;
These students will be reached per-l
sonally by the four members of the
board of advisors to foreign students
appointed by President Harry B.'
Hutchins and will be taken care of
by the advisors during the year. Thea
board is composed of Prof. J. A. C.
Hildner of the German department,;
who is also the chairman of the board,
and one of the directors of the Cos-i
mopolitan club, Prof. Ewald A. Boucke'
of the German department, Prof.
Charles P. Wagner of the Spanish de-i
partment, and Prof. James P. Bird,i
secretary of the Engineering depart-I
ment.
PARIS PROFESSOR TO SPEAK
UPON "SUCCESS OF AVIATION."

Plans for the new science building
submitted to .the Board of Regents at
their meeting yesterday by Albert
Kahn of Detroit were approved and
the architect was authorized to con-
tinue work upon them. Additional
routine business was transacted. At
noon the Regents went over to the
Hill auditorium to hear a recital-given
by Earle. Moore on the rebuilt organ.
At the opening of the meeting a res-
olution was passed reading: Resolved
that "the Board ofDRegents extend cor
dial greeting to Dr. James B. Angel
and express our deepest wishes for
continued convalescence and a speedy
return to complete health."
Acceptance was made of the report
of the summer school, the treasu'er 's'
report, and the literary facu'lty rec-
ommendation that members of the lit-
erary department give extension lec-
tures for the benefit of the school
teachers in Detroit.
Degrees of L.L.D., Master of Science
and a large number of graduate A.B.'
and B.S.'s were given. Faculty chang-
es were sanctioned, embalming certifi-
cates issued, as well as hospital train-
ing school certificates. Several fellow-
ships were also renewed.
DEAN VAUGHAN SPONSORS PLAY.
Richard Bennett is Asked to Produce
"Damaged Goods" Here.
Maintaining that the sociological
play "Damaged Goods" will prove a
potent factor in advancing the stand-
ard of public and private morals, Dr.
V. C. Vaughan of the medical depart-
ment has asked Richard Bennett to
produce his play before the students
of this institution. No definite date
for the first performance of this dra-
ma, whch deals with the social evil,
has been fixed, as the play has several
engagements booked for an indefinite
period at theatres in the larger cities.
That it will be given in Ann Arbor is
a certainty. Whether the manage-
ment will follow the precedent found-
ed in New York city of limiting the
audience of the first night to those
who have received special invitations
is not known at this time. In New
York, Washington and Chicago invi-
tations were sent to the officials of
the state and city, to leading physi-
cians, clergymen and teachers and to
men and women prominently identi-
fied with social -welfare work for the
first performance.
CROSS COUNTRY RUNNING
TO BE REVIVED BY ROWE.
The re-establishment of cross-
country running on the standard
which it enjoyed in the years 1905-0-
07 is the plan of Coach Floyd Rowe,
famous Michigan two-miler, and the
officers of the Cross-Country Club.
Of recent years interest has flagged
and an absence of winning teams has
resulted in small squads and no com-
petition.

Louis Eich, '12, has accepted a po-
tion with the Ann Arbor high school
s instructor in English. Before com-
g to Michigmn, Mr. Eich spent one
ear at the University of Cincinnati.
nce graduating, he has been enrolled,
iring the summer sessions, in the
aduate school in Ann Arbor.

Su'sBand Plays "Varsity."
Sousa's band played "Varsity" as
opromptu selection at the concert
hitney theatre last night.

Dr. Angell is Much Improved Friday.
Dr. James B. Angell passed a quiet
day yesterday and was able to breathe
more freely. He was able to lie down
for the first time since he was taken
ill.

Professor L. Marchis, director of the
aviation laboratory at the University
of Paris, will lecture in French upon
the "Success of Aviation," consisting
of two talks illustrated with lantern
slides.
He is expected to arrive in the city
this morning and will be the guest of'
Dean Guthe during his stay here. The
lectures will be given next week at
dates to be announced.

an
in

NO

ADMISSION TO TODAY'S GAME-
Unless Students present Athletic Book at Gate.

Coupons may be ex-

changed for Athletic Books at Association Office, 424 So. State St., up to 2:30 p. m. today.

Game Starts 2:30 P. M.

General Admission 5

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