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December 03, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3 ,1913.

PRICE

1

t

PRY PLANS
IR TRYOUTS!
For (ast of U:nion Qpera
Be Given First and
ro bable 0nly Trial
Decebenr 11.

O LEY ELiECT ED TO
'RESIDENTIAL VACANCY
Will Be Stage (d at Whitney
and Not a1
University Hall.
meeting of the limes at
an Union last ight, the,
showed real signs of life.
.e cast tryouts and the pos-
were made. The entire
ead, the lines being inter-
Ray Melton, '13, the au-

i

GRADU:ATE NOW tANDIDATE
FOR STATE COVERNORSH P
Alexander J. Groesbeck, '93L, prom-
inent attorney of Detroit, who recent-
ly announced his candidacy for the
Republican nomination for governor,
was one of the youngest graduates of
the University of Michigan law de-
partment. He received his degree
when he was but 19 years old, and he
had the unusual distinction of being
admitted to the state ba r before en-
tering college, He has taken active
interest in university affairs and he
h as been present at many Michigan
functions since his graduation.
MONSTER CABA RET
DINNER IS ASSURED
'i'ransvaal Student to Sing Select ions
From "The 3Iikado7' Tickets
Nearly Exha uisted,.
VOS3l OPOLHTANS TO OFFECR S KITS

Player

Position.

Fritz..........L.E.
Balu n........... L.T.
Munns.......... L.G.
Simpson.. ......C.
Pennock........ R.G.
Pontius .........R.T.
Solon ............. R.E.
Hughitt.........Q.
Craig............L.H.
Norgren ........ R.IH.
Buckley.........F.B.

....... Cornell
.Princeton
......Cornell
P.ennsylvania
.Harvard
Michigan
... Minnesota
......Michigan
.. ..Michigan
.......Chicagoj
...... Harvard1

College,

YOST PICKS HDHTPONTIUS
i AND CRAIG ON ALL-AMERICAN

made for The Detroit Free Press, are
qualified, however, inasmuch as Yost
has only chosen men from those col-
leges who abide by the three year rule
for football players.
Three Michigan men, Craig, Hughitt
an d Pontius are picked for Yost's elev-
en, and two other places go to west-
ern players. Solon of Minnesota gets
an end position and Norgren of Chica-
go is placed at right half.
Though Yost has not seen all of the
players in action this season, he has
seen the aijority of them, and his se-
lections are based on keen judgment
of football men.

11W NlNE N1AY OPEN 1)0011
TA) REVEl VE C ORN II SKERS
Current dispatches from Chicago in-
dicate that Nebraska will probably be
admitted to the. Western Iute reolle-
giate Conference, and that Notre Dame
will probably be turned down.
The C ornhuskers this year defeated
Minnesota, going through their season
undefeated, and again winning the
Missouri Conference title. They have
track and basketball relations with
the Gophers during the coming sea-
son, but at previous ineetings of the
"Big Nine" their overtures have not
brought about favorable action.
COUNCIL ASKS FORJ
AN ELECTION PLAN

COMEDY CLDI
CHOOSES Cl
FOR 1914 S
In (losely Contested Tryout
Tilree hours Last Night,
Selections Were Tiade
"Scarecrow."
FIRST REREARSAL SCHED
FOR 7:00 O'CLOCK '1
T414et U-folded WillRankr
Above Hest Clu Zia
Produced.
In one of the most closely
tryouts ever held for parts in
edy club production, a full
chiosen last nlighlt to prey
"Scarecrow," one of Percy A
'st4erpieces. The tryouts 1
oyer three hours, and the co
for some parts was so keen
judges were forced to call
same scene several times,
Lee, of the engineering fac
Arthur Cohen, '14L, wereethe
tee which made the final cho
following is the cast which
called upon to present the p
Justice Gilead Merton .

For the first time in his football ca-.
reer, Coach Felding H. Yost has pick-
'eg an All American eleven. The above1
selections for an All- American team,+

IiaHviiias Ugedfo cudIdeas
('boos ug Co IHCiIlmen to
Siwetry

For

INTEREST KEEN IN
CLASS BASKETBALL,

MICHIGAN EXCELS
IN XMINOR SPORTS

romley, '14, was elected
>f the Mimes, Paul Dough-
having resigned at the last
George F. Young, '14, was
treasurer, to fill the office
E'dward Moseman, who did
to school this fall.
tryouts are arranged for
December 11, probably at
of music. There are 16
arts to be filled. Many of
ho played leading roles last
be back, but there will be
ces for new material. If a
umber of men turn out at
leeting, the final personnel
med without a subsequent
pirants for the chorus po-
1 not be given a hearing
Christmas vacation. The
1 be judged by a committee
Prof. William Howland and
of the school of music fac-
lert St. John, Ray Melton,
and Karl Hoch, '14, gen-
er, and active Mimes mem-

With the issue of the 200 tickets
practically exhausted, the cabaret
chicken dinner to be held at the Mich-
igan Union tonight, is planned as one
of the biggest Union dinners ever
held. The affair will begin promptly
at 6:00 o'clock.
"Just Over," the cabaret act to be
presented by the Mimes, has been re-
hearsed and is filled with situations
of the most laughable nature. The
characters are Waldo E Fellows, '14,
Clarence Otter, '17, Sam L. Adelsdorf,
'14b, Lyle E. Clift, '14,Bernus E. Kline,
'14, and Gordon C. Eldredge, '14.
The skit will be played about the
tables, instead of upon the stage. liar-
old Schradzki, '15L, has been chosen
to act as interlocutor. The Cosmo-
politan club promises two numbers,
the principal one of which will be a
cabaret dance by Durward Grinstead,
'161, and Jabin Hsu, '14. Both will
wear Chinese costume, Grinstead, Who
starred as a woman in "Contrarie
Mary," taking the part of an oriental
princess. William S. James, of Tra ns-
vaal, Africa, for six years upon the
metropolitan stage, wil singe selec-
tions from the "Mikado."
The "gold-tooth quartet" will sing,
Ralph S. Delbridge, '17, will furnish
selections on the piano. Chase B. Sik-
es, '16E, will furnish a baritone solo.
A student orchestra will play during
the dinner hour.
JUNIORS WORK FOR
HOPRESTORATIO11i

sixteen Teamns Sign Up For Series Director Rowe Says Wolverine Syslel
Which Will IDecide Campus * Produces Belter Teams Than
Chiampionship. E1stern etl ols,
MORE TTHAN 100 ATTEN I) FEETING IfUN I'0 IS CORN EL'S FORTE
Prophecies that interest in class Michigan's system of interclass ath-
basketball this year would be record .letic activities is far superior to those
breaking, were borne out last evening, of Yale, Harvard, Pennsylvania, Cor-
when the attendance at the first meet- nel. or Columbia, according to Intra-
ing in Waterman gymnasium over- mural Director Floyd A. Rowe, who
flowed the room originally chosen for has returned from an eastern trip of
the session. Sixteen teams signed up f more than a week's duration, during
for the championship season, which which he investigated the methods of
will open immediately after the holi- athletic training in vogue at the vari-
011s easterii institutiOns.
days, and there are probabilities of . i o
The entirely voluntary system used
at least one other team taking thea *m
atMichigan produces more teams,
floo. -brings out more individual athletes,
The large number of teams which and is superior to the systems of the
will take part in the series led to the eastern universities from every view

GIVE RUISI FLAGS 'FO SEtCURIS
Suggestions from any individuals
on the campus, regarding the best
method of selecting councilmen, will
be welcomed by the student council.
The decision was :,rde at the regular
meeting of the body last night. All
who have constructive ideas about the
selection are requested to send them
at once to Thomas F. McCoy, '14L
secretary of the council.
The suggestions will be read by the
secretary at the first regular meeting
of the organization in 1914, on Janu-
ary 6. The'y will be discussed, and
the best will be adopted.
Besides the decision, the council
formally awarded the flags to the win-
ners of the fall contest. A discussion
upon the recent riot case followed,. Nc
definte action was taken.

artists, wishing to submit posters,
will probably be called together this
week, and the nature of the show will
be explained to them. They will be
given until after Christmas vacation
to complete their drawings. As in
previous contests, a prize of $10.00
Will be offered for the most worthy
drawing
Although there has been rumor to
the effect that U niversity Hall might
be arranged to house the production,
Karl Hoch, general manager, states
definitely that the 1914 show will be
played upon the Whitney boards.
TWILIG H T ORGAN RECITAL
DRAWS AUDIENCE OF $ )o
The growing popularity of Earl V.
Moore's twilight organ recitals was
attested yesterday afternoon, in Hill
auditorium, by an audience of over
2,500 people. Conditions are now such
that these complimentary concerts bid
fair to rival the Choral Union series in
attendance,.
By substituting, upon request, Dvor-
ak's "Humoresque" for a Widor sym-
phony, Mr. Moore tended to lighten a
program which already contained the
barcarolle from "The Tales of Hoff-
man" and a gavotte from "Mignon."
Any criticism was dispelled, howev-
er, by the masterly way in which each
of these peremial favorites was ren-
dered.
FATE OF PAPER TO
BE DECIDED TODAY
The fate of the new publication,
Student Life, whose right to existence
has been challenged, will be determin-'
ed this evening, according to a state-
ment made last night by Editor Sidney
Kellar, when he will go before Prof.
A H. Lloyd, of the board in control
of non-athletic activities, for the pur-
pose of presenting his side of the con-
troversy, The decision on the ques-
tion will be determined by the board
of which Professor Lloyd is a-member.
Kellar, according to his statement.
is confident that the board will allow
the magazine to continue publication
in view of his claim that the publica-
tion of the paper is in no way a cam-

appointment of a committee of five,
which will attempt to secure outside
accommodations for practicing, in ad-
dition to the gym courts.
More than one hundred prospective
players attended the meeting, and Di-
rector Rowe's suggestion, that the
committee negotiate with various

point, in Director Rowe's opinion.
There is much more campus interest
in class contests at Michigan than at
the eastern schools. As an example
of this condition, Director Rowe cited
the fact that several hundred specta-
tors attended the last three or four in-
ter-class football games, whereas at

sporting goods manufacturers for the Cornell and Harvard, where he wit-
donation of a set of medals and tro- nessed several inter-departmental
phies, in return for ,the patronage of gaines, fifty spectators constituted a
the local basketeers, was adopted. liberal attendance. The final cham-
Four teams from the literary and pionship soccer game, at Cornell where
engineering departments, three from the association game is the only form
the law, two from the medic, two from of interclass football, .drew about 75
the dental, and one from the homeo- persons.
pathic departments signed up last ev- In discussing the characteristics of
ening. These aggregations will begin the different eastern universities vis-
preliminary workouts at once, under ited, Director Rowe stated that cross

Junior lits elected Cecil A. Brown
to represent them on the student coun-
cil committee, which will investigate
plans for returning the J Hop to the
roll of Michigan institutions. The
junior engineer class advisory com-
mittee will probably meet some time
today to decide on some course of ac-'
tion, and if it is decided to have the
class elect a representative, this elec-
tion will be held at a class meeting
Friday morning at 11:00 o'clock.
The 1914 Hop committee will pre-
sent its petition for the re-instatement
of the .Iop to the 1915 committee,
which can be chosen and organized on
short notice. If the 1915 committee
agrees to the propositions contained
in the petition, it will be presented to
the senate council at its meeting Mon-
day night for ultimate consideration.
The student council committee will
not have anything to do according to
this plan, unless the senate council
rejects the advances of the Hop com-,
mittees. The council committee does
not intend presenting a given plan,
but rather wishes to make certain that
th+.-plan submitted to the senate coun-
cil will be satisfactory to all classes
of students.

the various class managers.I
All players who are to remain in
Ann Arbor during the holidays, should
report to Director Rowe at once, as
practice teams will be organized for a
short series of matches during that
time. Dr. G. A. May has promised the
use of the gymnasium courts during
the vacation, and it is expected thatI
departmental teams will be organized
for these games.
P1L A N STRENUOUS WEEK ENP
FOR EXTENSION LECTURERS
Professor S. F. Gingerich gave an
extension lecture in Hillsdale last
night, on "The Humanism of Words-
worth." There will be two lectures to-
morrow night, Professor C. 0. Davis
Center," and Dean V. C. Vaughan in
in Jackson, on "Schools as a Social
East Lansing, on "Eugenics." The
schedule calls for five lectures Friday:
Professor J. R. Brumm, on "The Es-
cape From the Commonplace," in Or-
tonville; Professor H. R. Cross, be-
fore the Detroit Arts Guild; Profes-
sor J. S. Reeves, in Alpena, on "Our

country is the leading interclass activ-
ity at Cornell. Soccer football is play-
ed, but there were only seven teams-
this fall, as opposed to fourteen class
teams at Michigan. Each class at Cor-
nell furnishes five runners for the de-
partment cross country teams, but
this one branch of athletics is the only.
one highly developed at Ithaca. Di-
rector Rowe attributes Cornell's in-
terest in cross country running largely
to the fact that the men are allowed to
f work off their gym credit in this man-
ner.
At Columbia, basketball and swim-
ming are the leading interclass sports,
owing to the congested condition of
the outdoor field. At Yale there are
inter-departmental games, but fewer
teams and shorter schedules than at
Michigan. At Harvard, rowing and
tennis receive the emphasis in class
athletics. There are only four depart-
mental football teams, as compared to
the fourteen class teams at Michigan.
brey Tealdi in Grand H aven, subject
not announced; and Professor C. 0.
Davis, in Jackson, on "The School as

TO SPEAK ON NOVA SCOTIL
TO FORESTRY' CIJH TON1, ll'I'
An illustrated talk on ."Winter Re-
connaisance" by 0. F. Schaefer, post
graduate, will feature the smoker of
the Forestry club at 7:30 o'clock to-
night in rpom 407, new engineein-
building. Schaefer spent last winter
in Nova Scotia, and will tell his ex-
periences to the local foresters. A
short business session will irecede
the smoker.
'CO-OP' PLAN HAS
BRIGHT PROSPECTS
"Michigan has good prospects of a
'co-op' store," said Werner Schroeder,
'14, last night, one of the chief boost-
ers in the co-operative movement. "In
case capital is unavailing," he contin-
ued, "we can start business with a
second hand book exehange which is
very remunerative. Wisconsin's store,
which started its career with a small
stock of blue books, did business last
year to the amount of $123,000, and
saved the students 13 per cent on their
purchases.
Michigan had a "co-op" store nine
years ago, but failed because it could
not carry a line of supplies suificient
for student needs. By avoiding past
mistakes, and profiting by the others'
success, it is expected to give Michi-
gan an enterprise which wi'ill be profit-
able to all concerned.

L)i. Vwel
Goody Rickby .... 4uyllis Pc
Lord Ravensbane Thomas Mur
Dickon...........H. L. Nuttii
Rachel Merton ........ Mary
Mistress Cynthia Merton .....
.Louise Robson, L
Richard Talbot .. Louis Friedi
Sir Charles Reddington
Gordon Eldre
Mistress Reddington . Ethel Ke
Amelia Reddington .........
. Forence Wi
Captain Bugby .... Waldo Fell
Minister Dodge ..Bernus E. K
Mistress Dodge .... Helen Ba
Rev. Master Rand.........
.. Leon Cunningl
Rev. Master Todd ..H. Pilgri
Micah............Owen Wint
For the last three weeks th
bers of the club have been v
unflaggingly in the effort to fi
selves for the final test. Th
lhusiasm and energy has pra
overcome the lack of exp
.hich so handicapped them
the early part of the season,
was the unanimous opinion
judges that the talent display
rank the production above tl
that the Comedy club has yet
ed. The greatest cause of rE
that some of the members, of
tional ability, have been forced
ininor parts by being barely beo
for a character which they coi
ry most succesfully.
From now on the cast wil
down to the final grind. Parts
learned by rote, and the coach
devote their time to polishing
bolstering up the .weak parts.
The first rehearsal will be
7:00 o'clock tonight in the
Francais rooms.

Drama League Meets Tonight at Union
All students interested in the Drama
league should meet at the Union to-
night, after the cabaret dinner. The or-
ganization aims to promote better
dramatic taste, and to bring better
plays to Ann Arbor. Everyone inter-
ested in .the movement should- attend.

YPOST WILL COAC
TEAM NEXT Y
If there are any Michigan s
who doubt whether Fielding I
will coach the Wolverines aga
season, they may put aside thei
Michigan's mentor will undo
be on hand next year to tutor t
Varsity team.
The fact that Yost's actual c
with the Michigan athletic aut]
ran out a year ago, has cause
mor that- the popular coach mi
take charge of the WolverinE
season. Director Bartelme
however, that according to -a
agreement with Coach Yost,eitb
ty must give notice to the of
days 'before the close of the I
season, if a change is desired 1
lowing season. Yost coached tl
verines this year under this
ment, and as no notice has bei
by either party during the seas
Coach Fielding H. Yost will
charge of thei Michigan Varsi

Complicated Ballot"; Professor Au- I a Social Center.

s

For the
Rest of
the Year

s

Delivered
at your

THE MICHICAN DAILY

door

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