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November 30, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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OIL AND WATER, DON"

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

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ON

B

FREUSH WIILL STUART SEASON
WITH AFTERNOON0: DANCING
Social activities of the freshman lit
class will commence with a "freshman
round-up," to be held in Barbour gym,
Friday, December 5. Dancing, lasting
from 4:00 until 6:00 o'clock, will fea-
ture the amusement program. The
committee is planning a number of
features pertaining to yearlings in
general, and intends to supply a suffi-
cient quantity of eats.
Following this, on Monday, Decem-

GIVES OUT PLANS
FOR ARMY COURSE
President Hutchins Tells of Summer'
Camp to Be Established in
Michigan.j

MICHIGAN SOCCER'
TEAM IS WINNER
Ypsilanti Normal Aggregation Defeat-
ed in Second Encounter With
Wolverines.

SCORE STANDS 5 TO 1.1

itons

UNIVERSITY MEN ARE ELIGIBLE. I FINAL

Exist

FOUNDERS OF PUBLICATION
FAIL TO ASK PERMISSION.
Authorities Claim Right to Supervise
and Regulate All Student
Activities.
The right to existence of the new
publication, "Student Life," which re-
cently appeared on the campus, has
been questioned. Registrar A. G.
Hall, faculty editor of university pub-
lications, has notified the business
manager, J. S. Rich, '17, to- confer with
him about the right to publish the
magazine.
It is stated that the founders of
the new publication have not yet con-
sulted with the non-athletic commit-
tee, nor have they received permission
from the board of control of
student publications. Permission
from one. of these bodies is esseritial
before an activity of this kind can be
started.
Even if such permission had been
obtained, J. S. Rich, being a freshman,
it is claimed, would not be allowed to
hold the office of business manager un-
der the eligibility rules.
According to Registrar Hall, the
university has the unquestion-
ed authority to supervise and
regulate student's activities of
any kind. Under this ruling it is be-
lieved that an organization such as
"Student Life" must have recognition
from the authorities before it can ex-
ist.
MORE SONGS NEEDED FOR
CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION
Final Plans Will Be Made at Meeting
Tomorrow Night-Committee
Announced.
Several songs have been received
for the Christmas celebration to be
held free for Michigan Union mem-
bers, Thursday night, December 18.
Much material is still needed, how-
ever, and will be received until 6:00
o'clock tomorrow night. The commit-
tee desires minstrel librettos, songs,
jokes and any other material suitable
for a minstrel performance. At a meet-
ing of the committee tomorrow night,
final plans will be outlined.
According to present plans, two per-
formances of the minstrels will be giv-
en with a short intermission, during
which a few vaudeville numbers will
be staged. The committee for the
celebration is as follows: Cyril Quinn,
'14, chairman, Eugene Bigelow, '16E,
Louis M. Bruch, '16L, Leo Burnett, '14,
Douglas Donald, '15, Harry Galt, '15,
Arthur Janes, '15E, Harold Schradzki,
'15L, William C. Thompson, '15E,Lynn
Van Fleet, '16E, and J. Herbert Wil-
kins, '14.
COMMITTEE WILL ENCOURAGE
LOCAL INSPECTION OF FOOD
Local supervision over the quality]
of food used in the Ann Arbor board-
ing houses will be encouraged by the
campaign committee of the working
students in Ann Arbor. At present,
the inspection is made by a state meat-
inspector; but the general impression,
according to the committee, is that1
the state officer is inefficient. The
body will co-operate with the Univer-
sity health service in an attempt tos
place the work of inspection into the
hands of some expert.

ber 8, a smoker
Union, to which
be invited.

will be given at the
all fresh lits are to

ALLEGED RIOTERS
TO BE ARRAIGNED
Daniel Newton, '17, I. S. Olson, '164,
J. S. Green, '17E, and John Carmody,
of Detroit, the four alleged rioters ar-
rested in connection with the demon-
stration after the Penn game on No-
vember 15, will be arraigned before
Judge E. D. Kinne in the circuit court
tomorrow morning on a charge of ri-
ot, and the date of their trial set.
The cases of Lawrence J. Damm and
George Schaible, the saloonists charg-
ed with selling liquor to students, will
also come up at this time and the date
of their trial set.
NOTED Y. M. C. A. SPEAIXER
WILL TELL HIS LIFI4 STORY
E. C. Mercer Will Deliver His Famous
Address at Majestic This
Evening.
"Down and Out and Up Again"-
Mercer's life story, will be the subject
of the address by E. C. Mercer, under
the auspices of the Y.M.C.A. in the Ma-
jestic theater at 6:30 o'clock tonight.
More than 300,000 college men in
E. C. MERCER.

A short course in military training
as a means of materially increasing
the present inadequate personnel of
the trained or partially trained mil-
itary reserves of the United States, is
the object of the summer camp that
will probably be established in Mich-
igan, in July, by the United States ar-
my. Details of the arrangements were
announced on Saturday by President
Harry 13. Hutchins.
Only those will be allowed to attend
who are students in good standing in
a first-class university, college, or in
the graduating class at high or pre-
paratory schools. Students must have
attained the age of 18 years and none
over thirty will be accepted.
Regular army officers will be in
charge and regular army discipline
will be in force. Courses in map mak-
ing, with especial attention given to
road sketching, will be offered. The
theoretical principles of tactics, in-
cluding advance and rear guards, pa-
trols, outposts, and combat will be
presented by informal talks and war
games conducted by competent offi-
cials. Actual firing, with the service
rifle, will be held on a regular target
range. To those making the necessary
qualifications over the prescribed
course, the National Rifle Association
will give badges.
Physical drill, marching, camping,
tent pitching, breaking camp, loading
and unloading wagons, field cooking,
and first aid to the injured will be
taught by practice. Those successful-
ly finishing the prescribed course will
receive certificates from the War de-
partment and recommendations as to
fitness for future command will be
kept by the federal authorities.
General Leonard Wood says, "We
can teach the college man more in five
weeks than we can the average re-
cruit in three years: It is the number
of available officers that we wish to
increase. Students in these camps
will have full cadet status; that is,
treated with all the courtesy due pros-
pective officers, but subject to all rul-
es of the camp and the disciplinary
measures."
Expenses at the camp will be $17.50
for board, the government furnishing
tents, cots, blankets and a complete
infantry equipment for each man.
Each student, however, must purchase
the regulation olive drab uniform and
leggins.
Michigan Grad Joins Benedict Ranks.
Otto F. Steufer, '13E, formerly of
West Point, Nebraska, was married to
Miss Eunice Bauman, also of that city,
last night. The groom was a member
of Les Voyageurs, Corn Huskers Club,
and played on his class basketball
team during his college career. After
several weeks the couple will be at
home in Cleveland, Ohio, where Mr.
Steufer is employed by the National
Electric Company.

University of Michigan soccer play-
ers finished their season without a
defeat when they won from the Mich-
igan State Normal College team of
Ypsilanti, on Ferry field yesterday af-
ternoon, 5 to 1.
Yesterday's contest was the second
one between the two aggregations,
the former resulting in a 1 to 1 tie. In
the second game, however, the Michi-
gan players completely outclassed the
Normalites, and won with comparative
eVse.
'he vii i : h d M< i ',o a sin-
A. score i, the first half, but the su-
perior condition and endurance of the
locals asserted itself towards the end
of the game, which was played on a
slippery field during a drizzling rain.
-Ypsilanti scored late in the game
wlien Hurst slipped one past the Mich-
igan goal keeper. Pan was the star
of the Michigan team, his skillful drib-
bling and passing carrying the ball
down within scoring distance time af-
ter time. Coryell kicked two goals and
Watts one, while both missed several
others by narrow margins. The Wol-
verine backs presented a practically
impenetrable defense. Gretenburger,
at center half, was the star of the
risitors.
The lineup and summaries:
Michigan (5) Ypsilanti (1)
Glenny.......... O.R.. ........ House
Shutes.........I.R...........Hurst
Pan .. ..........C. . ......Gordon
Coryell.......... O.L. ........Harder
Watts (C) .......I. L. ......Brundage
Cohen ........... C.H. .. Gretenburger
Deliefde.........R.H.......Sherman
Li............... L.H. ........Cripps
Robertson ...... R.B.........Chase
Tripolitis.......L.B...........Ghee
Stalling......... G. .........Wood
Summaries: Goals, Pan 2, Coryell 2,
Watts 1, Hurst 1; time of halves, thir-
ty-five minutes; score at end of first
half, Michigan 1, Ypsilanti 0; referee,
Leech, Detroit.
CITY CIVIC FEDERATION TO
AID MUSIC SCHOOL PLANS..
Ann Arbor Boosters Ready to Assist
In Making Possible Enlarged
Quarters.
By a unanimous vote, the education-
al committee of the Ann Arbor Civic
association, yesterday passed a resolu-
tion to raise $25,000 for the purpose
of securing a new site and building
for the University School of Music.
The organization plans to close an op-
tion on property costing $50,000 and
to remodel it into practice studios, li-
brary facilities, rest rooms, and quar-
ters for physical culture.
More than 75 per cent of the stock
subscribed to the purpose in 1892, has
been surrendered, and the new proj-
ect will have a small surplus to begin
the campaign for additional funds.

COACHIIF A RELL W11ILL URGME
""REHENINT TRACK WORK
Track Coach "Steve" Farrell will
speak before the freshman gymnasium
classes next week, in an effort to
arouse interest in the approaching in-
door season. The yearlings will be
represented, as usual, both indoors
and out, this season, and the coach
hopes to have this year's All-Fresh
track team especially strong. There
are several first year men in school
of exceptional ability, and the compe-
tition has usually developed unknown
men into the Varsity caliber,
DENTAL FACULTY
SUSPENDS JuNIOR
Lynn I-. Tingay, '15D, of "Albion,
Michigan, was suspended f!m the
university for the rc semes-
ter,. o" Ol tal de-
a l , at a special n' ug Friday
afternoon. The charges u~ipon which
it is stated the suspension was based,
were mainly two,-disorderly con-
duct and intoxication.
This is the third suspension result-
ing from an alleged private celebra-
tion by three men on the night of Mon-
day, November 17. D. T. McKone, '17,
has been suspended for the rest of the
year, and R. J. Miller, '16, has been
given a like sentence for the balance.
of the semester by the faculty of the
lit department, as a result of their al-
leged participation in the jollification.
* * * * * * * * * *L *

*
*
*
*
*

HEAD) COLDS AND HOW TO
PREVENT THEM.
by
Dr. Howard Hastings CiumImings
* * * * * * * * ~*

*
*:
*
*
*

1. Work and sleep in well venti-
lated rooms.
2. Avoid exposure to cold winds
and draughts.
3. Avoid changes from heavy to
light wearing apparel.
4. Avoid sitting in class rooms,
when the feet are wet and cold.
5. Do not associate with those af-
fected.
6. Keep the body in good physical
condition by proper eating, regular
elimination of waste material, daily
exercise and bathing.
7. If the cold grows serious or if
you suffer from them frequently, re-
port at the University Health Service.
Acute rhinitis or cold in the head
is a mild, communicable disease which
affects the lining or mucous membrane
of the nose. The symptoms are ma-
laise, slight chilly sensations, head-
ache and a low fever. The nose feels
stuffy and there is a sensation of full-
ness in the forehead. Soon a watery
discharge comes from the nose,breath-
ing is impaired and sneezing is com-
mon. The nostrils and lips become
red and irritated from the discharge
and the friction of the handkerchief.
It is almost certain that this preva-
lent and uncomfortable ailmentis due
to an infection because of the frequen-
cy with which it travels from one per-
son to another, particularly members
of the same family or people occupy-
ing the same rooms.
The infiamation often spreads from
the nose to the air spaces in the head
causing abscesses, and the tubes from
the throat to the ears become involved,
causing earache, discharging ears and
even deafness. The tear ducts may
convey the inflamation to the eyelids.
The vocal cords and the lungs suffer
from the descending infection. So
the ordinary head cold is not a harm-
less disease.
.[Editor's note: This is the first of a
weekly series of articles by Dr. Cum-
mings dealing with the prevention of
common ailments. The second will
appear in this -same space next Sun-
day.]

YOSTCOACHED
Michigan Style of Attack Responsib
in Large Degree for Army's
Clean-cut Victory
Over Navy.
MIDSHIPMEN WERE UNBEATEN
UNTIL YESTERDAY'S BATTL
Forward Passes Feature Contest Whk
Upset Eastern Football
Critic's Dope.
(Detroit Free-Press News Service.
Coach Fielding H. Yost tickled t
Army mule and it kicked clear ov
the traces of the football dope, deci
ively beating the previously undefea
ed and, supposedly invincible Na,
team by a score of 22 to 9 at the Po
Grounds in New York City.
The influence of the Michigan coai
was seen throughout the batle. T1
soldier men departed entirely fro
their old custom of a few plung
through the line to gain ground a
relied on end runs and all kinds:-
forward passes. It was the kind
game that the Michigan mentor h:
taught his Wolverines and it prove
effective against the midshipmen
Annapolis.
The Army, just squeezing out a 7
6 win from Colgate and a 2 to 0 deci
ion from Tufts earlier in the seaso
was recently slaughtered by Not:
Dame 35 to 13, and conceded to 1
much weaker than the Navy.
The Middies, although held to
scoreless tie in the first game of t
season by Pitttsburg, had since defea
ed every opponent by decisive sore
including the strong Penn State tea
An easy win over the Army had be
expected.
Pritchard and Merrillat, quarte
back and right end respectively on t
Army, featured the. winner's scori
machine. Once a 45-yard run by t
flanker took the ball to the 5-yard li
from where Captain Hoge plung
over. Another time a forward pa:
from Pritchard to Merrillat while t
latter was standing back of the go
line added six points to the Army t
tal. In the fourth quarter anoth
pass with the same two men in ti
stellar roles resulted in the fin
counters.
Local interest in the contest w
keen, owing to the fact that th W
verine coach had been at West Po:
since the Yale-Harvard game, aidii
the host of Army coaches in polishii
off the supposedly weak cadets.
BASEBALL SCHEDULE KEEPS
ATHLETIC OFFICIALS BU
Regular Spring Jaunt Through Sou
Is Planned for Michigan
Ball Tossers.
Arrangements for the spring trai
ing trip of the baseball team are oc
pying the athletic officials these da
Several tentative outlines for t
southern jaunt during the Easter v
cation have already been drafted, a:
contracts will soon be closed for t
early season games.
The schedule next spring will
similar in outline to that of rec
years, but several new opponents w
be met. In April the team will swi
through the south in its. first half d(
en games, returning with the openi

of the university for several weeks
games at home.
The eastern trip will probably co.
about the middle of May, followed
games on Ferry field.

America have heard this lecture dur-
ing the past seven years.
I Tr.Mercer has been visiting sever-
al fraternities and holding conferences
with students and faculty, since Wed-
nesday. He will go to Detroit to speak
before the Y. M. C. A. Sunday after-
noon, returning for the address at
6:30 o'clock.
Mr. Mercer will hold consultations
with those who desire to see him in
Professor Cross' office in Memorial
hall, from 2:30 to 4:00 o'clock tomor-
row, leaving for-the east late Monday
night.
Music Will Feature Program at Union
Union members have been urged to
attend the regular Sunday afternoon
program at the club house at 3:00
o'clock today. While no speaker has
as yet been secured several good mu-
steal numbers have been arranged for,
including violin, mandolin and vocal
solos.

"Sone cperplexing questions
asked by the disciples and
answered by Christi
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:30 A. M.
6:30 P. M., C. E. Young people welcomed.

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Union Guild

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Thuoarce

SChii

Series

CHURCH
South fourth Avi

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Of Pittsburg, Pa.

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