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November 29, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-29

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1913.

PRICE

ces

LAST NIGHT.
Michigan band
in adopting a

I

VALUABLE FOSSILS ENRICH
UNIVERSITY COLLECTIONS.
Eight boxes of valuable fossils have
been received by the university mu-
seum, from the State Geological Sur-
vey at Lansing. These fossils have
been collected by state geologists and
because of lack of space in the Lan-
sing quarters, they have been sent
here and will be set up and put on
display.
The head of the fossil rhinoceros,
which was received some time ago,has
been set up and is now on exhibition.
This fossil rhino from Mr.Harold Cook,
of Agate Spring, Nebraska, in ex-
change for fossils collected by uni-
versity geologists and is a valuable
specimen.
Prof. J. C. Mariam, of the University
of California, has made arrangements
with the museum here, to send it a
skeleton of a Saber tooth tiger and an
extinct wolf, in exchange for valuable
fossils. The skeletons were procured
from the asphalt deposits at Rancha
La Brea, over which the University of
California have control.
The fossils sent in exchange were
collected by Prof. E. C. Case, in his
expedition to Texas last summer. The
skeletons have not been received, but
will be put on display as soon as they
arrive.

LOCALS

WON ON TURKEY

SOCCE5R MEN PLAY
YPSILANTI TODAY
Team From Normal Town Appears
on Ferry Field Today in
Last Game.

>n itself, and
ntrol the num-
disbursement
h is controlled
e appointed by
n. The main
ition is to ad-
d activities of

DAY.I

executive
x officers
secreta-
,n, drum
d repre-
r is the
associ-
ard, ap-
ociation.

attends
Bord C ERCL E FRANCAIS
oard at
to. ss5- OUTLINES SERIES
are pro-
n as the
out only First of Series of French Lectures to
Class B Be Given by Prof. Levi
ers, and on Dec.. 9-
ie'mbers.
eligible SEASON TICKETS WILL BE SOLD.
e other
e tryout Cercle Francais will open its annual
r and a series of French lectures and other
I of mu- French numbers with a lecture by
Prof. Moritz Levi, who will speak in
Js and
alcltrant Tappan hall, on December 9, at 5:00,
d, unex- o'clock on "Le Theatre de Maeter-
nt cause linck." The play has not yet been

A soccer team composed of Michigan
students will this afternoon at 2:30
o'clock clash with the Michigan State
Normal College team from Ypsilanti
on Ferry field, in what is probably the
final game of the year for the local
devotees of the sport. The two teams
have clashed once before this year in
a tie game at the neighboring village,
1 to 1.
A team picked from the local squad
journeyed to Battle Creek Thanksgiv-
ing day, where it defeated the Battle
Creek Normal Training school 1'to 0
'in a hard fought game. The affair had
been arranged as a practice tilt, but
the west starters put up a rather,
strong argument. The only goal was
scored in the first half, when the lo-
cals had a slight edge, the second
half being more evenly played.
Although there has been no regu-
lar schedule for the soccer team this
fall, a surprisingly large number of
men have shown a keen interest in the
sport. The daily practices have av-
eraged more than 20 players in attend-
ance, and an effort will be made to
place the sport on a more stable ba-
sis next year.
WHEAT AND DOUGLAS FINISH
:FIRST IN BRIDGE AT UNION.
T.E.M. Wheat, '14E, and S. Douglas,
'14E, were high, with 3,085 points, and
G. C. Patterson, '14E, and W. J.
Clement, '15E, were second, with 2,956
points, in the first round of the Union
bridge tournament, which started last,
night. Twenty-one of the 23 couples
entered were present to play in the
first round.
To Consider Sale of Red Cross Stamps
The Ann Arbor Society for the Pre-
vention and Cure of Tuberculosis will
hold a meeting Monday,at 4:30 o'clock,
in fhe medic building, where it will be
decided whether or not the sale of
red-cross stamps will be undertaken
this year for the benefit of the state
organization. The stamps are now on
sale in the state society's office in the
medic building. They, consist of a
small red cross partially covered by
a green and red Christmas card show-
ing Santa Claus drawn by a reindeer.
Many Men to Sell Dinner Tickets.
Tickets for the next Union member-
ship dinner, to be held Wednesday,
will be placed on sale this morning, at
the desk, and also by committee mem-
bers who are so distributed, by class-

DR, HILLIS CANNOT
LECTURE MONDAY
Oratorical Program Speaker is Forced
by Illness to Cancel
Date.
MAY APPEAR HERE IN JIANUARY
Word has been received from Dr.
Newell Dwight Hillis, pastor of the
famous Plymouth Church, Brooklyn,
who was to have lectured in Universi-
ty Hall, Monday night, under the aus-
pices of the Oratorical -association.,
that illness will prevent his appear-
ance as scheduled. Dr. Hillis will
probably be able to appear some time
in January.
The number was to have been the
strongest on the program, and the as--
sociation officers are sure that al-
though the date of the lecture is in-k
definite, the appearance of the famous
lecturer will be assured.
The next number of the course will
be the Peace Contest on December 19.
At this time, the university represen-
tative will be chosen who will com-
pete at Cleveland, April 25, 1914, with
winners of contests held in Illinois,
Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania
and Wisconsin. The winner of the
Cleveland contest will be considered
the representative of the western di-
vision of the Intercollegiate Peace as-
sociatiton, and will meet the eastern
representative on May 14, 1914, at
Lake Mohonk, N. Y., for the national
championship honors.

ENSIAN WILL BOOST PEF FOR
SENIOR PICTURES VEHRUR 11Y I
In order that there may be no is-
uaderstanding in regard to re;ulations
pm taining to the pi-t -es foi the 19.
Michiganensian, the management
wishes to make it clear that after
February 1, the fee of $1.%t0 which is
charged for making the cuts will be
raised to $1.25, whil after February
15 no pictures will h accepted at all
except by written :)rder from the man-'
aging editor who has statad that few,
if any, of such special permissions
will be granted.
The $1.00 which is to apply on, any
extra pictures whic'i senioi's ray wih
to have taken, will be a onstant
amount so long as th, pictures can be
taken, thus making the total f.e for
the sittings $2.00 up to January 1,and
$2.25 between February 1 and 'Febru-
ary 15.
Badger Will Head itcui SwhcivIy.
The Senior Dental socieY hel it.
anrutal election of officers yestrday
morning in the dental building. The
following men were elecyei. Presi~
cent, H. A. Badger; vice.p: dent, C.
V. Manville; secretary, C. \. *1ones;
tic.asurer, Paul C. Hoh. ' he first
regular meeting of the societj vil b
Id next Wednesday, Dccmer ;:.
RHETORIC COUNCIL
HEARS LOCAL ME.N

Five rio

PROBE IM
FIVE Cl

been
for tl
been
the r
dent
lance

Combined Actions
Result in Five
and One Sc
TWO REN ARE:!

lax
te
Co

ures

gation is 1
probes by
university
council. I
who are-av
of rioting,
charges of
and minors

EL

Prof. F. N. Scott Advocates Newspaper
Work for All Secondary

c4
d4

t nomina-
ed, which
Vednesday

put in nomination: for
0. Walthall, M. A. Nor-
tary, G. L. Strong, S. M.
or assistant leader, G. J.
McKinley; for librarian,
J. O'Hara, F. C. Wheel-I
major, A. 0. Olson, W.
for governing board rep-
. A. Lange, C. B. Worth,
bach.

ontrary to an impression prevalent
the campus to the effect that there
m unusual amount of sickness
mg the students this fall, Dr. How-
es. Cummings of the University
Ith service announces that there
fewer cases of serious illness than
many years.
EW PAPER WIL.
BOOST MICHIGAN

chosen.
M. Andre Bellesort, official lectureri
of the Alliance Francaise, will speak
on the French novel on February 23.
Associate membership tickets will
be sold by members of the French fac-
ulty and members of the Cercle, and
will admit to all the numbers on the
program. The price of the tickets will
be 50 cents to students, and $1.00 to
others.
Following is the prog-ram for the
year:
"Le Theatre de Maeterlinck," M.
Moritz Levi, December 9.
"Un Voyage Aux Indes," M. Philip
Bursley, January 13.
"Soiree Musicale Dramatique et
Dansante, January 23.
"La Vie A Constantinople," M. Har-
ry Wann, February 17.
"Dans Quelle Mesure les Romans
Francais sont-ils la Peinture de la So-
ciete Francaise Contemporaine," M.
ndre Bellessort, February 23.
"Guy de Maupassant," M. Percival
Fay, March 3.
Soiree Dansante, March 20.,
"La Jeunesse Francaise d'Aujourd
'hui," M. Rene Talamon., March 31.
"Conference sur la Piece :Choise,"
M. Robert Effinger, April 28.
Representation Annuelle du Cercle
Francais, April 30.
GLEE CLUB UNABLE TO MEElT
PENN SINGERS IN' DETROIT
Michigan Musical Clubs Receive Offer
to Collaborate on Penn's
Western Program.
A tentative proposal has just been
received from the musical clubs of the
University of Pennsylvania, by the
management of the Glee and Mando-
lin clubs, calling for a combined con-
cert in Detroit on January 1. The
Pennsylvanians are contemplating a
tour through the middle west during
Christmas vacation, at which time the
Detroit concert was planned. H. B.
Carpenter, '14, business manager of
the clubs, was forced to turn down the
Easterner's proposition, however, be-
cause of the fact that many members
of the club would be unable to get
back to college In time for the neces-
sary preparations.

REA L ESTATE IS NEW COURSE
IN CLEVELAND UNIVERSITY.
Theory Will be Taught and Agents
Will Explain Art of Selling
Land.
Western Reserve University is the
first university to offer a course in
real estate business, in this country.
Not only will the theory of real es-
tate selling be taught but agents who
are in business will instruct the stu-
dents in the art of conducting a pros-
pective purchaser to a vacant lot and
painting the picture of the proposed
dwelling vivid enough to get the first
installment.
"The latest trend of college education
is to train students to become' eco-
nomically self sustaining and that Is
one reason why we are offering this
course," said Dean Mathews, secre-
tary of the university, when interview-
ed on the new course. "The establish-
ment of schools of journalism in near-
ly all the universities and colleges is
one instance of it. The idea now is to
turn a college man out at his gradua-
tion equipped to make a living. There
is money in the real estate business;
it serves a public need and college

PROF. TRTEBLOOD ALSO SPEAKS.
CHTCAGO, ILL., Nov. 28.-Professor
F. N. Scott, of the University of Mich-
igan, today advocated a week's in-
struction in newspaper work in the
junior and senior years of the high
school course in a speech before the
National Council of Teachers of Eng-
lish, which is in session here.
The speaker declared that the news-
paper is "the most powerful and per-
suasive influence of our day and na-
tion," not excepting the Bible; and
declared that the press was a greatI
nullifying influence which counteract-
ed the work of educational institu-
tions in grammar and English.
Professor T. C. Trueblood, the oth-
er speaker from the University of
Michigan, contended that slang and
colloquialisms, errors of grammar anc
style, the split infinitive and the dang-
ling participle, could be more easily
corrected than violations of the prin-
ciples of anemity, truth, sincerity, and
self-control.

aw
th(

law dep
vestigat
It is
council
the unit
ester, a
not con

In

y to

Fifty J-L;
Junior laws
at the Uni

purpose. une
Arbor yesterc
upon recomme
council, will :
the police for
part he played
The faculty

es, as to cover the entire campus. A" men going into it would serve both
cabaret program has been arranged the real estate business and the college
for the occasion. man too."
-..-------------..-- --.---. "--~- -.----------
Railroad Jack Seeks Pastures New.
Tom We Have Always With Us
Coincident with the reappearance of in the open air, but has had the sad
Dr. Tom Lovell, cobbler, poet, philos- fact impressed upon him, that he can-
opher and campus bard in our midst, not emulate Wililam Jennings Bryan
after a sojourn of some months under successfully, in the face of several
the Union Jack, our esteemed friend hundred howling students. Tom says,
and historian "Railroad Jack" comes "I ,,r --. .--

COSMOPOLITAN CLUB WILL
PICK NATIM AL DELEGATES
Plans for sending delegates to the
national convention of the American
Association of Cosmopolitan clubs
will be formulated at the regular meet-
ing of the board of directors of thE
Cosmopolitan club this evening at 6:0C
o'clock at 611 East Liberty street. Two
delegates will probably be sent to the
convention, and will be financeo by
the club. The committee consists of
Fred B. Foulk, '13-'15L, William W.
Welsh, '12, and Prof. J. A. C. Hildner.
of the German department.
The board will also consider name:
recommended for membership, and
provisions for the "Cosmopolitan Stu-
dent," which comes here in January

nished
a smo
days.

"Student Life," a new publication is-
sued by students of the university,
made its initial appearance this month
with the avowed object of boosting
the University of Michigan among the
high schools and smaller colleges of
the state. Through personal contact
with the men at the head of these
schools the publication is placed In
the hands of all those schools with the
hope that by means of articles and
stories about the university and its
life more men may become interested
in the state institution and its stu-
dents, and ultimately enter the uni-
vers'ty.
The paper is issued eight months
of the year under the editorship of
S. M. Keller, '16L, and has as its bus-
iness manager, J. S. Rich, '17. The
current issue contains a number of
articles contributed by Fred B. Foulk,
'13-'15L, W. A. John, '16, Y. F. Jabin'
Hsu, '14, and Ruth C. Johnston, besid-
es numerous jokes and a number of

"From N
conversatio
ulty, there
in the mor
body, since
ed E. C. 1
among the

forward with plans for an extended
lecture 'ttour among the benightted
universities of the great West to last
for several months, perhaps years.
Tom arrived in this city several
weeks ago, direct from Windsor, Can-
ada, where he has been trying his
luck in the mending of "soles," and
forming his plans for his new position

! "I want to show the world what lays
within me, so that its inhabitants can
decide for me whether it shall be the
shoe-shop or the platform."
It is with regret that we mention
the departure of "Railroad Jack." Af-
ter being with us off and on for the
past 12 years, he has decided to take
a western trip. On this tour he will

as a lecturer, on the lyceum and cha- make his initial appearance at the
tauqua circuit. His position will pay, University of Wisconsin; at Madison.
him $75 per lecture, more or less. He , After educating the students there,
is at present located on Detroit street, his plans are uncertain, but he says,
Ann Arbor, in Rowe's Laundry apart- "I will travel only where the climate
ments, where he has hung out his is suited to my health, and that will
shingle to the following effect: "Dr. probably be south west."
Tom Lovell, Cobbler and Poet." Wares In preparation for his entertain-
exhibited in his windows are shoes and ments, "Jack" spent 12 hours of his
original songs. birthday, which was Thanksgiving, in
He corresponds daily with the lead- learning new names and dates. He
ing lecturers of the country and will has now 7,000 dates, and 3,500 names
make his debut as an already -famous committed to. memory, and spends
speaker, about March 1. from eight to 12 hours each day in
He has profited by his experience learning new ones.

Clinical Society Will Meet Wednesday Lnave retien nter taieay ev e
The December meeting of the Uni- terintics, and haveycomenh
versity of Michigan Clinical Sc 'iety contact wth universityme a
will be held Wednesday, December the country, and the same char
at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, th the better is notable."
medical amphitheater of the hospital Mr. Mercer will be the guest
The program which will be under th pha Tau Omega at luncheon
direction of Dr. Roy B. Canfield will and will be .t h etTheta I
consist of a paper entitled "two cases for dinner. He i trpe ty f
of Rickets," by Dr. D. M. Cowie. "The Theta Delta Chi fraternitya
Treatment of Wounds in the Femoral o'clock. In addition to these
Artery" byDr. C. G. Darling; and a tions, he will keep consultatio:
in Prof. Crosa? 4.ffce both r
paper by Dr. Alfred S. Warthin on indPfterosn
"Cancer and Heredity," and a report and afternoon.
by Dr. James Van Zwalonberg.Wk As E
________________Vork of Akrehiteets is oin Exi
Canned goods, flour, cement, coffee, An exhibition of 'plans, dry
structural material, medical instru- and designs is being held in. tb
ments-zounds-no end of things, gallery of Memorial hall. A
amounting to 170,000 pounds of mate- work was done by the classes
vial awaited the arrival of the uniyer- i chitectural design. The exhil
sity truck Tuesday morning at the be on view every day from 8:00
Michigan Central depot. until 4:00 o'clock.

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