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November 27, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

II

I Have You Tried

Society Brand Cl

yes

ie you looked at our
lr footwear and our
assortment of house
,rs? We have rub=
with heels wide e=

Our New Chocolate at the Fountain ?

The powder costs is twice as much per pound as any other
kind and ors is the only fountain where you can get it, hot or
cold.
We are willing to pay the price for the sake of having the best..
C al ki n s' Pharm acy
324 South State Street

Have "that different air" of dis-
tinction that places them in a class
by themselves, If you've vainly
hoped that some day you would
find a suit that measured up flush
with your ideas, your desires will
be more than realized in snappy
models we are showing,
Styles that smack with the smartness of the
boulevards and college campus, yet are in strict
keeping with refinement, see them today,

fit the

full

i9

Store

V0MMNIt TI('rON.

119 S. Main Street

yesterday, today
and likely to-
morrow almost ev-
ery store, big and
litlwill scream
"We've got the
best!" Just sup-
pose you take a
look at Wadhams
& Co. Suits, Over-
coats, Mackinaws,
Hats, Caps and
Furnishings.

Main Street

CO.

123 South

A. MARQUARDT

n

I

Jfine
' Lrtri

any sport is ren-
er by being prop-
ped.
iding & Bros. are
to cha inp i on s,
lements must be
right. Quality
Catalogue is nok
r the asking.
IdiDg & Bros.

(Tie lichtgan Daily assumes no re.
sponsibility for sentiments express.
ed hi coimunications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
It is quite natural that the freshman
class should not lend their approval to
the proposed freshman disfranchise-
ment, because of its direct effect on
them. I write, however, in defense
not only of a class who are freshmen
this year, but of a class who will be
sophomores next year, and of a prin-
ciple of universal applicatidn in affairs
of student government.
The freshmen, it is true, are unfa-
miliar with conditions upon arriving
at the University, but this is no evi-
dence that they remain so throughout
the year, or that the disorder would be
remedied by withholding from theme
for another year the chief incentive
they have to make them familiarize
themselves with the things on which
they are to vote. From the view-
point of their unfamiliarity with con-
ditions, there would be much greater
logic in disfranchising freshmen in
their own class elections, shortly af-
ter the opening of school, at which
time theyi are almost totally unac-
quainted with their classmates; yet
the folly of this expedient is evident
when we consider that the class elec-
tion is one of the greatest incentives
for them to meet together and become
acquainted. The freshman who has
not the interest to study the questions
at issue during, the practically entire
year, before the general election un-
der the stimulation of expecting to
take part when it comes, surely would
not be any more likely to devote atten-
tion to them during the first year,
when he had no expectation of being
called upon to to make practical ap-
plication of the information which
he might acquire.
To the plea that the freshman is not
interested in the results, I would reply
that, so far as the interest of being
governed by the results is concerned,
he is more interested than the senior,
as, unlike the senior, he comes back
the following year, and is directly un-
der the influence of the elections from
which it is now proposed he be debar-
red. It would be pertinent to ask
whether the greater dissatisfaction
would result with the elections, if the
sophomore class under the regime of
the officers elected had, or had not
had, a voice in the election of those
officers. In the case of freshmen dis-
franchisement in the election this
coming spring, for instance,-next
year the officers elected this spring
would represent only the franchise of
those students on the campus who
would be juniors and seniors, and of
seniors' alone in the three year cours-
es. The freshmen necessarily, and
the sophomores and three-year-course
juniors arbitrarily, would be totally
unrepresented.
There is but one more important
point to consider, and that is the con-
tention that the freshmen would more
deeply appreciate the ballot if de-
prived of it for another year, which is
analogous to saying that a young man
would more deeply appreciate the bal-'
lot of the state and nation, if he were
deprived of it until he were, say, twen-
ty-five. Even so, it is not my under-
standing that the purpose of having
these elections by the student body is
to imbue the voters with a sense of
deep and heartfelt gratitude to some

unknown power for being allowed the
privilege of voting. It is rather to get
the affairs controlled by these elec-
tions more representative of the stu-
dent body under their influence, and
hence more able to draw their sup-
port. HAROLD B. TEEGARDEN, '17.
CAMPUS IN BRIEF.

Suits Cleaned and Pressed
and repaired
Cor. Main and Huron-.Over Farmer's
and Mechanic's Bank.

--Kentucky club will hold its annual
Thanksgiving day banquet at the Un-
ion at 6:00 o'clock this evening. V. K.
Kelley, '14L, will act as toastmaster
and J. B. Helm, '14L, E. C. Foltz, '15E,
and W. K. Miller, '15, will speak.
-A mock track meet will feature the
entertainment to be held at the Bap-
tist guild at 8:00 o'clock tonight.
Twelve events are scheduled. Mem-
bers and their friends are invited.
---There will be no men's gymnasium
classes today and tomorrow. The
Friday sections are dismissed to keep
the work of the various sections even.
--Fully )00 prescriptions, given out to
students at the infirmary have been
filled by the chemistry department
since the initiation of the health ser-
vice. They may be filled in room 372.
--Regular meeting of students Inter-
ested in aerial navigation will be held.
at 1:00 o'clock, every Saturday after-
npon, in room 248 of the engineering
building. Special leefures on the sub-
ject, discussion and tests of the effi-
ciency of different planes and models,
will occupy the hour. Work will be
started, during Christmas vacation
on the blueprints, from which the new
glider -will be made.
-President harry R. Hutchins will
address the cadets at Culver Military
Academy, Culver, Indiana, Sunday.
He will leave town Saturday, return-
ing Monday.
-Edward S. Corwin, '00, has recently
written a book on political science en-
titled "National Supremacy; Treaty
Power vs. State Power." Mr. Corwin
is now professor of political science
at Princeton University. .
-A new edition of Shakespeare's
works has recently been published, en-
titled The Tudor Shakespeare. One
of the volumes, Troilus and Cressida,
was edited by Prof. J. S. P. Tatlock of
this university.
--Dr. Reuben Peterson, of the Univer-
sity hospital staff, will deliver a pa-
per before a medical society in Syra-
cuse, New York, next Monday. night.
From there he will go to Philadelphia
where he will deliver a paper before
the Philadelphia Obstetrical Society.
-Everybody is invited to an old-fasF.
ioned box social in McMillan hall at
8:00 o'clock Friday night. Each girl
is requested to bring a box containing
lunch for two, which will be auction-
ed off to the highest male bidder.
-Professor W. J. Hussey, director of
the obstervatory, has nearly finished
his work in Argentina and will be back
in Ann Arbor, late next January, to'
conduct his classes during the second
semester.
--The annual dinner of the Missouri
Valley alumni asosciation will be held
at Omaha Tuesday, December 2. The
dinner will be at the University club,
and several prominent alumni willR
speak. The committee in charge con-
sists of Dr. C. T. Uren, '10M, Arthur

Jo B. EIBLE
109 W. Liberty Street
Across from Mack's side entrance
JEWELRY
Extensive Stock at Reasonable
Prices.
Watch Repairing, Skilled and
Trustworthy. Optical Supplies
Eyes Scientifically Fitted
Do yon realize within a few
weeks you will leave for that
Christmas vacation ? Drop in
while down town and look over
our line of Holiday suggestions.
Michigan Pins, Fobs, Bars
and Spoons
Silver Purses and Mesh Bags
You will be impressed with the
high quality of goods at prices
that will appeal to you.

I

i#mcirti WradIII.~

IJ. F. WUERTH COMP)

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT FOR

Barga
IN

GAS,

Coo0

T

A

For Fraternity and Cl

Mic

Army Sui
Pocket !

Increases Cleanliness and Efficiency. Telep
Representative to call and give you expert advice for your I
anent.

SUGD
302 S.

I

Washtenaw Gas C

I

F,

e ri tii

NOTICE
improve our telephone service we
nstalled a two phone system which
'ipelled us to change our present
number 1650 to 2280.
Ann Arbor Taxicab Co.
300 N. rlain Street

ESTIC

Found-Near
pocketbook
ey. Owner
municating
'Wshtenaw

Tappan hall, Friday, a
with small sum of mon-
can have same by com-
with R. H. McLean, 1126
Ave., telephone 678-L.
51

EXTRA

Friday and
Saturday Onl

Motion Pictures

Cornell - Michigan
Football Came

Taken at Ithaca

TWO DAYS, NOVEMBER 29 and 29
All Seats - - 10Cents
iltrated
FOR MENcribi ooklet de-
nri>ig a new
treatmeut for all
safety razor blades, making one blade
last a lifetime and be better than' when
purchave1.Sent on receipt of2 in coin.
CLAUDE WOLFE, Howard City, Mich,

Lost-Waterman pen without cap,
Tuesday afternoon, between Memo-
rial building and school of music.
Call up 1573-L, 722 Church street.
51C
Im~ted-- T\wenty-five extra women for
Henry W. Savage's production of
"Everywoman." Apply at stage en-
tranc of Whitney theatre, Friday att
12:00 o'clock. 50-52
Wanted-Two students to work fort
room (suite), 832 East University
Ave. Phone 1320-L. 49-S1i
Wanted-Twenty-five extra men for
Henry W. Savage's production of
"Everywoman." Apply at stage en-
trance of Whitney theatre, Friday
at 12:00 o'clock. 50-52
For Sale-Victrola and records, $17.
New. 904 Oakland. 625-L. 50
" Genuine Martin Guitars and Mando-
lins sold at Schaeberle & Son's Music
House. tf

Marowitz, '13L, Edward Rosenberg,
and Fred Paulsen, '07E.
-"Drama of the Seventeenth Centu-
ry," Spanish 4a, is being given once
more after several years absence from
the curriculum. This course now
makes possible four years of under-
graduate work in Spanish in the liter-
ary department. The course is again
being given in response to an increas-
ing demand for instruction in Span-
ish.
-A bill will be presented to the next
congress providing for the establish-
ment of a federal university at Wash-
ington, D. C. The bill is to Ve pre-
sented by the National Association of
State Universities, the idea being to
have a high graduate school, which
will have the natural advantages of
the libraries and museums at Wash-
ington.
-Prof. J. R. Allen will deliver an ex-
tension lecture in Detroit Sunday at
the Detroit Museum of Art.
-Membership of the Michigan Union
Boat club has passed 200, and the
committee is continually working to
increase the enrollment. A smoker
will be held at the Union, December
11, and a formal dance will be given
after vacation.
-The Rhodes scholar for this year
will probably be chosen December 27,
at a meeting of the committee in Ann
Arbor. President Harry B. Hutchins,
sent out letters yesterday suggesting
this date. The committee consists of
Chief Justice J. H. Steer, President
H. B. Hutchins, Dean J. R. Effinger,
President B. W. Anthony of Adrian,
and President Samuel W. Dickey of
Albion.
-Professor Albert A, Stanley of the
musical department, will lecture De-
cember 11, in Toledo, before the Mu-
sical Art Society of that city on "How
May a Community Become Musical and
Is It Worth While?"
-Junior medies will celebrate the suc-

W. H. Smith sells Victor Ty
ers. Second-hand Royals and
woods. 102 E. Huron, over Da
Call 2380-L for demonstration
dents insurance 35 cents per h
WE SELL GOOD CLOTHTf
Suits at $10.00-All wool.
Suits at $15.00-All wool, ha:
ored.
Suits at $20.00-Adler's Mal
Style.
Suits at $25.00-Equal to Fine
tom work.
ALLEN'S GOOD CLOTHES S
Main Street.
Best shoe shine, hat cleani
blocking next to Wagner's.
Liggett's Gilbert's and Fenwa
.olates - in perfect- condition.
Rexall Drug Store, 122 S. Main:
Modern Methods give me b
sults for printing and developi
it our work room and see for
self. Lyndon.
If you Want the best in ch1oc
try Liggett's, Edsi l's Rexall
Store, 122 So. Main St.

cess of the class football te
won second honors in the
championship, at a dinner to
next week in honor of the te
-Griffins will give a dance a
er's Friday, December 6. Th
ion, known as "the fall deis
be featured with special danc
-The forestry club will give
er next Wednesday evening
o'clock in room 407 new eng
building. Fred Shaffer will
paper on "Winter Reconnaisi

Tango class and mgtinee
Academy, Thursday afterno
5:30. One hour instructior
of dancing. Chaperones in
50 cents per couple. Singl
25 cents.

at

THEE NEW SONGS
"As the Years Roll By"
"I'l Return to You Again"
"You're the Idol of My Heart"
They are rich in sentiment and music. 10 cents per copy
Our Chrfstmas stock of musical goods has arrived.
GRINNELL .BROTHERS
120-122 E. Liberty St. Phone 1707

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11

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