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November 23, 1913 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i fr YYY IY

Whitney Theatre
M 0N D AY
MATINEE-NIGHT
November 24
25c to $1.50

Fire ..Pumlp Tests Are Satisfactory. S. J. Zowski. The pumps, run by
Tests of two new rotary fire pumps, electric motors, were each found to
for the university system, were com- be capable of forcing water at the
pleted Wednesday in the mechanical rate of 1,250 gallons a minute at a
laboratory under the direction of Prof. pressure of 150 pounds.
Whi tne yTheatre
NIGHT Wednesday, Nov. 26
The Noted Author and Dramatist
THOMAS DIXON
Announces Under His Own Management and Supervision
The
Thethor

I

With original company, including Mr.Chas.C. Craig
A Gripping Play from the South from Mr. Dixon's Story of the same name
A Plea for the Purity of the White Race.
Dorothy Dix says: "A Fragment of the Real, Torn, Ragged and Bleed-
ing from the very Heart of Life.-Rich in Irresistible Comedy."*
PRICES "
First Four Rows Orchestra... .........,.........................$1.50
Four Rows Balcony................ .... ........
Balance of Balcony......... . . ..........SO

t

11 WHITNEY

TULEATRE

1'

Two Days Only M SATINREE, SATURDAY
FARA, Nov. 8P.29 " :"."M.
HENRY W. SAVAGE OFFERS ,

F1

INSTALL ENGINES
IN POWER STATION
Engines are bing installed in the
new university power plant, and the
interior finishing is being rapidly
pushed to completion. The work is
behind time, but it is expected that
the plant will be in operation by April
1. The total cost, including buildings,
machinery, real estate, and labor, was
estimated by Superintendent of
Grounds, Marks, approximately at
$500,000, although the present expendi-
ture will be limited to about one-half
that amount.
An electric railroad will connect the
Michigan Central tracks with the
storehouse and shops, behind the
homoeopathic hospital. All freight for
the university will be switched onto
these tracks, which are of standard
gauge, and will be pulled up to the
storehouse by an electric locomotive.
The roadbed will be approximately
4,050 feet in length, and will extend
over two viaducts. The contract has
already been let, and work is under
way.
The electric current for the entire
campus will be developed at the power
house by a 500 kilowatt, direct con-
nected, 2,300 volt, alternating current
generator, which will be externally
excited. The current will be conduct-
ed through the underground tunnel
to the sub-station, between the medic
building and the gymnasium, and
there will be reduced to a voltage of
220, and converted into a direct cur-
rent. The electric railroad will be
supplied with power through a trol-
ley wire, from a rotary converter lo-
cated in the new building and with a
delivery of 550 volts direct current.
A non-condensing, cross-compound
type, Corliss steam engine will fur-
nish the motive power for the electric
generator. Steam will be supplied
from eight boilers, which will be fed
with hot water from two Cochran
heaters. The boiler feed pumps, which
force the water from the heaters into
the boilers, will be electrically driven.
Plot water for heating purposes will
be forced through the mains by cir-
culating pumps, which will be driven
by a centrifugal steam turbine.
Much of the construction work, such
as the setting up of pumps, building
of the railroad bridges, and all work
on the sub-station, is being done by
the university grounds department.
Two bungalows near the new power
house have been purchased by the
university, on account of the decrease
to the owners in valuation of the
property, and are being used 'as
homes for nurses.
FORMER KANSAS PROFESSOR
HAS CHARGE OF BIBLE WORXI
Prof. Thomas M. Iden, who is con-
ducting the work in connection with
the Ann Arbor Bible chairs, comes
here from the Kansas State Normal
school. After teaching physics and
chemistry, he became head of the de-
partment of physical sciences in 1898,
and dean of the institution in 1909.
His most important service was
done outside the class room in organ-
izing "The Upper Room" ministry, an
evangelistic campaign among the men.
By his efforts an enrolment of 650
members was attained, for the pur-
pose of Bible "study.
Dr. Iden has been accustomed to
send a Christmas letter to each of his
students. The last one contained 25
pages and reached 4,000 persons.

"How We Know God" is the general
theme of the present series given at
444 So. State street, at 6:30, on Tues-
days and Thursdays.
Union to Feature "Matinee Dance."
A "matinee dance" will be held at
the Michigan Union, Thursday after-
noon, from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock. The
function will be conducted on the
same plan as the regular Saturday
night dances. One hundred tickets
will go on sale at the Union desk at
5:00 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.

TESTS SHOW CITY
WATERMOST PURE
Dr. 1V C. Vaughan, dean of the med-
ical department, said yesterday that
the water in the city mains is more
healthful than that in wells. He ex-
pressed a wish that all people in the
city would drink city water, since it
would make it easier for the medical
department to protect them from any
germs which might find their way into
the water. Some figures taken .from
analyses made during the last few
days shows that the city water con-
taines fewer germs than the average
well water. The highest number of
germs found in a well is 8,040 and the
lowest was 200. There were taps that
did not show any germs at all and the
average was three.
He said, "As long as the citizens of
Ann Arbor use the city water and
watch the bulletins for any warnings
of danger, Ann Arbor is reasonably
sure of escaping any typhoid or any
other epidemic which may trace its
origin to the water supply. But just
as long as the citizens of this town
continue to use the water from the
wells, which is clearly shown to be at
all times unfit for use, they are in
danger, and this danger is not only
confined to them but to all of the com-
munity in which they live."

Meetings in Majestic More Popular.
Attendance at the meetings held in
the Majestic theater under the aus-
pices of the Y. M. C. A. has averaged
more than 400 each Sunday evening.
Prominent speakers attracted such
large crowds that the space in New-
berry hall proved inadequate.
The idea of conducting religious ex

o On. N
Mon. Nov. 24-25
"fSATAN"
Drama of Humanity
in Four Parts
$100,000 Motion Picture

sidering the report of the committee
in charge of the Majestic series, the
board of trustees voted to continue
the wort as long- as sufficient inter-
est was manifested.

ercises in a play
periment at first,
cessful from the

All Seats

- 10 Cents

r

1 Ii

house was an ex-
but it proved sue-
start. After con-

/

AJESTI

I

TWO DAYS ONLY

-

You Can

,. .

Whitney Theatre
ONE NIGHT
Tuesday, Nov. 25th
Jacobs and Beverage Presents
MR. HERBERT O'CONNOR
as
MEPHISTO
In a- superb scenic Electrical Me han-
ical Revival of Goethe's Greatst
Tragedy
Dr. Faustus Famous Old Labora-
Te Cathedr al R -uremberg
Fiery Hades, the Broeken
The Gloomy Dungeon
The Vision of Paradise
Dazzling,Terrifying, Enthralling
A wierd object lesson to the sinner.
PRICES - - - 50c, 35c, 25c
FREE Concert outside Theatre, 7:30

Distinguish
An

I

" The Tremendous Dramatic Spectacle q q
Standing Solitary and Alone, the Culmination of
Three Centuries of Dramatic Achievement.
150 People - A Symphony Orchestra
&'Dazzling, Bewildering Display of Costumes,
Scenery and Electrical Effects.
Lart-est Musical and Dramatic Organization
Ever Toured

n ~ yi
Overcoammt

i

I

coR1wow $Y

Thirteen Rows Orchestra....... 2.00
Eight Rows " - ...... 1.50
rRos Bacony..............1.00
Nine " ti ................. .75
Gallery..........................50
MAIL ORDERS

'Ma.tiuoee
Four Rows Orchestra...........$1 50
Balance U.. ... 1.00
Four Rows Balcony...............75
Balance $...... ........... .50
Gallery..........,...... .....,..50
RECEIVED NOW

To make Judgement fair to yourself you need
only to select your style and fabric,, Leave your
measure and tell us to have

a)

hitn y T eate TANKSGIVING
DAY
White
ThurMdayNov . 2
MATIMEE 3 P. M

Ed. V. Price & Co.
Merchant Tailors Chicago, U. S. A.

tailor your overcoat to order.

You

H. H. FRAZEE'S Great Astor Theatre Production

FINE

will thus enjoy not only comfort,
warmth and graceful fit, but eco-

FEA TERS

nomical price as well.

Let

us serve

you.

By Eugene Walter
Author of "Paid In Full,"' "Easiest Way"

The Play of The Century

! ' . i
C:J "

Prices:

- - $1.50, $1.00, 75c, 50c
MaIM Orders Now

AMMON"
1

4

-.a -amme

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