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October 03, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-03

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Michigan

Da

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y

IDCJAY NIGHIT IHAS
BEEN A TRITEL V

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1913.

PRICE FIV]

No. 4.

PRICE FlY

r 1

SHAKES

ITY IN

JLR ANVFLL IPROVES STEAI)ILY
Condition at Present Warrants Hope
For Recovery.
-From now on Dr. Angell will im-
prove steadily, if nothing unexpected
interferecs," said Dr. James F. Break-
ey, last evening,.'
11e rested easily last night, follow-
ing a rather bad day. His desire to
read the newspapers increases every
day, as he wants to know the exact
status of the world's affairs.

UNION OFFERS
CAMPUS OPEN

NAL DRILL

ATTEMPT TO

Fullback Benton's injury Makes New
Backfield Combillation Neces-
sityz Line I Also
Shif ted.
(GAUi1T ANDI BENTON AT FULL;
NEW GUARDs ARE ALSO TIlED.
LMlctner and Cochran Work in Place
of Masser and
Allmending'er,
Yesterday's rain prevented the
scheduled scrimmage for the Varsity,
but did not prevent the coaches driv-,
ing the men through an hour and a
half of gruelling signal practice. Yost
took advantage of the opportunity to
try out several new combinations in
the backfield, and also made two
changes in the line, and at the end of
the workout the makeup of the team
which will face Case was still more of
a mystery.
Renton's muscle bruise has turned
out to be rather serious, and the prob-
ability of the fullback being out of the
game for several days has made it
necessary for the coaches lo hit on a
new backfield combination.
(ault,who has been playing at quar-
ier on the scrubs, was tried out at
fullback in the combination that was
used the longest. Later he was sent
in at quarter, with Hughitt 'at Bent-
gey's half, and the latter at full.
Lichtner was given a short tryout
at Allmendinger's position at right
guard, and Cochran replaced Scott at
the other side of Captain Paterson,
Owing to the slippery condition of the
ball and footing, no satisfactory opin-
ion of the new combinations could be
formed, at least by the critics.
At the end of the drill a scrimmage
session for today was announced, and
it is probable that the showing of the
men in today's tussle will have a
large bearing on the makeup of the
men who will start the opening game.

HOUSE TONIGHT
Prof. Bunker to Talk at"Pep"Meeting.
New Song Books Will Be
Used For the
First Time.
CHARLES E. CROWE, '14E,
CHOSEN VICE-PRESIDENT

ADD SENATORS
AS LECTURERS
LaFoilette, Beveridge and Hoke Smith
Sought By Oratorical
Association.
DEAN FULTON OF OHIO WILL
OPEN PROGRAM OCTOBER 17.
Course Also Includes the Famous
Jacob hIis, Friend of
Roosevelt.

*
*
*
*:

* * * * * * * *
UNION MEMBERSHIP.
--o--

'12-'13
Thurs...........396
Fri. .............1597
Sat. .............805
Sun............891
Mon .. ...........1281
Tues. ............1462
Wed............1555
Thurs..........1594

'13-'
5
8
11
16,
18
20
20

* *
*
*
14 *
33 *
08 *
51 *
'6
X70*
90 *
15 *
53 *

DANCE REFORIl
WILL RULE I
UNIONPARi
Directors Prohibit Modern Ex
in Dancing-Adopt Mid
die Policy For
Assemblies.
EXPECT STUDENT SENTIM
TO FURTHER NEW PR(

LITS AN L AWS CONTINUE
ENROLLIENT INCREASE.
The constant gains in the lit and
law departments were further increas-
ed yesterday. According to figures
at the close of the registration, the
total lit figures were 2,501, a gain of
285 over those enrolled the same time
last year and an increase of 123 over
the total registration of last year.
In spite of the increased stringency
in the entrance requirements of the
law department, today's figures show-
ed a gain of 15 per cent over the enter-
ing class of last tyear. Te total reg-
istration up to Thursday evening was
520, only 59 less than last year.
MUSEUM OLETS NEW SPECIMENS.
Summer Expedition to South America
Very Productive.
Thousands of rare animals were ac-
quired by the museum expedition
which was sent to Columbia, South
America last June. The party was
composed of the director of the muse-
um, Dr. Alexander G. Ruthven, in
charge, Mr. Frederick M. Gaige, Scien-
tific Assistant in the Museum and Dr.
A. S. Pearse of the University of Wis-
consin.
The specimens obtained are now be-
ing prepared in the Museum and when
completed will present an exception-
al exhibit.
The Chinese Students' club will have
its initial meeting tomorrow evening
at 7:30 o'clock in McMillan hall. Pres-
ident V. T. Maw will speak and sketch
the plan of the year in social, relig-
ious and other activities.
1
FACULTY SUPPORT
EXTENSION PLANS

Membership Increase Was
Yesterday, Due to
Weather.

Slight1

With a giant "Open House" tonight
at 7:30 o'clock the Michigan Union
welcomes the entire male part of Ann
Arbor's student population, and cele-
brates its biggest year with yells,
singing and no lack of "eats" and
"smokes." "We want them all, there,"
said President Selden Dickenson yes-
terday. "It is our greatest and most
informal reception."
On the eve of Michigan's first grid-
iron battle and with no mass meeting
scheduled, the "Open House" will
serve as a "pep" generator for the en-
tire student body., Prof. Bunker will
give a lively talk and an orchestra will
prevent any lull during the entire ev-
ening.
The new Michigan Union song books
will be used and first year men who
are not acquainted with Wolverine
melodies will have an opportunity to
rehearse. Probably some of the cheer-
leader try-outs will be on hand to
arouse some old-time "Sirens" and
"U-of M's."
The roll shows but a slight increase
in membership, explained largely by
the weather man yesterday. However,
the membership is in excess of the
count on Wednesday of the third week
of college last year. The committee
hopes that the reception tonight will
cause an appreciable gain toward the
3,000 goal.
At the directors' meeting yesterday
Charles E. Crowe, '14E, was picked as
vice-president to succeed George Duf-
field, '14E, who was elected last year
and is now working in Detroit. At
last year's polling Crowe received the,
second highest number of votes.

Negotiations are being carried on by
the Oratorical association with several
statesmen of national reputation for
lecture dates and it is very probable
that Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia,'
Ex-Senator Albert Beveridge, and Sen-
ator Robert M. La Follette will appear,
on the course before the season is
over.
The lecture course of twelve big
numbers, with thetprospect of theuad-
dition of two or three extra features
without added charge, is' proving a
tempting program. On November 21,
Jacob August Riis, the famous author
and social worker,--the man whom
ex-president Roosevelt speaks of as
"the most useful citizen in New York,"
will lecture on some of the sociologi-
cal problems of the day. Dr. Newell
Dwight Hillis, successor to Henry
Ward Beecher as pastor of Plymouth
Church Brooklyn, has been secured
for December 1.
Prof. Robert Irwin Fulton, Dean of
the School of Oratory in the Ohio Wes-
leyan university, will open the pro-
gram October 17. Other numbers to
follow are a reading by Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister of the oratory department,
Mrs. Isabel Gargill Beecher, the Uni-
versity Peace oratorical contest, the
Michigan-Northwestern debate, the
Hamilton oratorical contest, the Asso-
ciation play, the University oratorical
contest and the Cup debate.
Mason Hall Is Once More on Campus.
As a result of action taken recently
by the Board of Regents the old name
of Mason Hall has been reaffirmed and
given to the building now known as
south wing of University hall. This
name was applied to the old south
wing many years ago in honor of Ste-

HILLIGAN NAMED AS PRESIDENT.
Varsity Football Manager Now heads
Athletic Association.
Morris A. Milligan, '14, Varsity foot-;
ball manager, was elected president
of the athletic association at the meet-
ing of the board of directors of the
athletic association held yesterday af-
ternoon,
Plans for the election of track and
baseball managers, to be held October
11, were also considered. Last year's
managers of the Varsity and baseball
teams left school without preparing
any. records of the work done by the
committeemen, and for this reason
there is some question as to who will
be eligible to run for the offices. No
definite nominations were made and
the matter is due for further consider-
ation.
The board awarded numerals to the
four freshmen who were mem-
bers of last year's freshman tennis
team. The men are: J. S. Switzer, C.
N. Mack, C. B. Crawford, and R.
Thorsch.

UNIVERSITY SEISMOG'RAPH
REGISTERS PAN AMAV QUAKE
When the records were taken from
the seismograph yesterday afternoon
Prof. R. H. Curtis, of the astronomy
department, at once discovered the
evidence of the Panama earthquake.
According to his calculations, the
shock was approximately 2,200 miles
away, and in.his judgment either in
Alaska or the West Indies. The ma-
chine recorded the principal shock at
10:30 o'clock Wednesday evening, cor-
responding with the press dispatches
from Panama concerning the earth-
quake there at 11:30.

Orgaiiizations Will Be Asked to l
Movement-First Dance
Comes Saturday.
By prohibiting the clutch-hold
the "hesitating Boston," and adopi
"a middle policy" for all dances,
Michigan Union plans to prevent
of the unfavorable criticism preval
last year. This policy was determi
on at a meeting of the directors y
terday afternoon. No resolution N
passed, but it is thought that stud
cooperation will be most effective
placing Union dances beyond the
proach of even the most conserval
-censors.
In speaking of the board's act
Selden Dickenson, president of the 2
ion said, "The Michigan Union dan
are conducted by the students and
the students. We'fell that there i
student citizenship of which the Un
tries to be the highest embodime
It is for the best welfare of the s
dents to make their dances absolut
unobjectionable to anyone. Every s
dent knows when he is a trifle too
treme, and we -want him to be guic
at all times by his better judgme
The one-step, the tango, the waltz a
the two-step can all be danced gra
fully, and by leaving the matter w
the students themselves we feel tl
the best results will be obtained."
Letters have been sent to all f
ternities and sororities asking to h
the matter brought to the attention
all members. The letters explain
attitude of the directors in adoptinj
"middle policy" and ask for coope
tion.
The first danceof the season is to
held tomorrow night and by start:
right -the management hopes to est
dish a policy for the entire year.
INTERCOLLEGIATE,
CHAMPAIGN, ILL., Oct. 2-Can
Zuppke make good?a That seems
be the big question that is worry:
the conference schools, but here
Illinois the students and players
resting confidently about the matt
for, after taking a squint at wl
"Zup" is accomplishing on lIllin.
field, they are sure that the team w
finish well this year.
Prospects for a winning combir
tion are poor, and Zuppke has a ha
task on his hands. Out of sevente
"I" men, only six have re-entered t
university, and five of these are bac
field men. They are Captain Rov
Schobinger, Wagner, Senneff., Wils'
and Chapman. Only a half dozen
a brilliant freshman varsity team ha
returned to school, and most of the
new men are backfield candidates.

PROF. ADAMS LEAVES TO
ASSIST CHINESE REPUBLIC
Professor Henry C. Adams, of the
economic department, left yesterday
afternoon for Pekin, China, where
he will do research work for the orien-
tal republic.
Professor Adam's work is not to be
that of chief financial adviser to the
Chinese government, but is in con-
nection with the standardization of
railway accounts and the compiling
of statistics and records of railways,
throughout the country. London and
Liverpool, England, Moscow, Russia
and the northern part of Siberia are
to be visited before Professor Adams
takes up his duties at Pekin. Pro-
fessor Adams will probably be absent
from the university for a year.
Patrick D. Koontz, '14, was chosen
business manager of the Gargoyle by
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications to succeed Herbert Jose, '14.
Mr. Jose has left college to enter the
automobile industry in Indianapolis,
1nd.
PROF. ADAIS' COUORSES WILL
ALL BE GIVEN AS USUAL.
All courses announced to be given
by Prof. H. C. Adams will be contin-
ued. However, his year's leave of ab-
sence necessitates several changes in
instructors.
Courses 36 and 39, in railway oper-
ation and the seminary in transporta-
tion will be given by Prof. David Fri-
day. He will be assisted by Mr. Lang-
maid, a graduate of the Harvard
school of business administration.
Course 5 in labor problems will be
given by Prof. Frank Carlton of Al-
bion college.
Course 2 in political economy givenI
the second semester will be conductedI
by Prof. W. H. Ilamilton who will givel
most of the lectures. Special lecturesc
will be given as last year.I

By a unanimous vote of the faculty
of the literary department last night,
the petition for extension lecture
courses to be given the school teachers
of Detroit, by members of the univer-
sity faculty, was favorably recommen-
ded to the attention of the Board of
Regents.
This is an entirely new phase of
work for the university instructors,
and consists of members of the differ-
ent departments offering courses in
their special work to the school teach-
ers. The same rules of attendance
and instruction will be used as are em-
ployed in the university courses, and
these courses are expected to afford
great benefit to those taking them.
If the Regents vote favorably on this
proposition today the extension lec-
tures will probably start tomorrow.
SALOON CASE TO BE GIVEN
SECOND HARING TUESDAY
Absence of Attorney for Defense May
Occasion Some Delay
in Trial.
'The case of People vs. Lawrence
Damm which was appealed from the
district court to the Circuit Court last
spring is to have its second hearing in
the court house Tuesday, October 7.
By supplying two freshmen with liquor
last year, Damm, who conducts a sa-
loon at 111 W. Washington St., is
charged with violating a statute which
forbids the sale of intoxicants to stu-
dents.
Although neither side is looking for-+
ward for a delay in the trial the open-
ing of the case is contingent on the
arrival of Col. Kirk, attorney for the
defense, who is at present in charge
of several of the state militia in the
northern part of the state. It cannot be:
learned. what new arguments the de-i
fense will offer, but the much contest-
ed constitutionality of the law willl
probably figure in the trial.,

COACHING CLASS
TO-BE ORGANIZED,
Coaching in football, baseball, and
track athletics will be taught in a reg-
ular class this year under the direc-
tion of Intramural Coach Rowe, if
enough eligible students are interested
to organize the work.
The men will receive lectures by
Varsity coaches and trainers at a con-
venient evening hour, and text books
in the various subjects will be studied.
While no credit will be given for the
work, it will be conducted under a
systematic and thorough plan; and
the men who successfully complete
the course will be competent coaches
for high schools.
During the different seasons the
class will be on the field under a,
coach's direction, watching the de-
velopment of the Varsity teams at first
hand. The members of the class, will
be appointed coaches of the various
class teams, and will also officiate at
interclass games.
The increasing demand for teachers

vens T. Mason,
igan.

first governor of Mich-I

SUBMIT BUILDING
PLANS TO REGENTS
Tentative plans for the new science
building will be presented to the
Board of Regents at their meeting to-
day in the Regent's room of the law
building at 10:00 o'clock.
These plans call for an expenditure
of not more than $350,000, with an ad-
ditional $25,000 for equipment. The
structure will be of the same materi-
al as the present chemical building,
although of a strikingly different
shape. I
The idea is to fill the space opposite
the Hill auditorium from the road
running just east of the law building,
along the diagonal walk to the
Mall and to North University avenue,
on a line parallel with the Chemical
building. This will give the structure
the appearance of a cut-off square,
with an auditorium facing the law
building. Contrary to rumor the diag-
onal walk will not be disturbed.

To Rigidly Enforce "Abstinence" Law.
Chief of Police Kenny notified every
saloon keeper in the city yesterday af-
ternoon that the state law against
selling liquor to students would be
strictly enforced and that immediate
arrests would follow any infringe-
ment of the statute.
CROSS COUNTRY

MEN ASSEMBLE

That cross country running bids fair
to elevate itself from the ranks of the
minor sports at Michigan, was indicat-
ed by the interest displayed by the six-
ty men present at the first meeting of
the club at 7:30 o'clock last evening.
Live pep talks were given by Capt.
Brown, Coach Rowe and Trainer Far-
rell.
Under the direction of Coach Rowe
the club will be conducted along lines
entirely different than in former years.
Each man intending to try out must
hand his card to the secretary of the
club and the roll will be taken before
the daily canter. From this record,
every man with regular attendance
will be presented with an engraved
card of merit at the end of the season.
Three local events have already
been arranged for, including a novice
race for those who never took part in
cross-country running before, the an-
nual fall race, this year to be run as
a handicap, and a dual race with a
team from the Detroit Y. M. C. A. or
the Michigan Agricultural College
It is now certain that if men of suffi-
cient speed are developed a team will
be sent East in the spring.
Every man with cross-country as-
pirations is requested to report to
Coach Rowe this afternoon at 4:30 at
the Gymnasium for the first workout
of the year.

who can coach high school athletic PROF. VAN TYNE TO LECTURE
teams led to the establishment of this IN FRENCH UNIVERSITIES.
branch of work, and the education fac-
ulty is enthusiastic over the new Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, head of the
course and will strongly recommend department of history, who is spending
the men completing it. - a year's leave of absence abroad, has
Membership in the class will be re- been asked to give a series of lectures
stricted to senior literary students who in several French universities. The
are enrolled in the education depart- lectures will all be on subjects con-
ment, and will be kept at a small num- nected with the American Revolution.
ber. Eligible men who are interested With his family Prof. Van Tyne is
in the work should see Coach Rowe at now settled in Paris, where, in addi-
once. He may be found at the ath- tion to his lecturing, it is his purpose
letic office from 8:00 to 12:00 or 1:00 to do research work in the, libraries
to 3:00 o'clock. of the French government.

MADISON, WIS., Sept. 23, (Specia
-With the gridiron season well und
way, Badger .forecasts are varyi
from the blackest sort of "bear st
ries" to predictions of another cha
pionship walkaway.
The truth of the matter seems to
that no one, from "expert" to "frosh
knows anything definite about t
Cardinal prospects. There have, be
so many upsets in the camp, so ma
caleidoscopic changes, that matte
are well "up in the air." Four vete
ans, all counted on for the 1913 i
chine, have failed to return to scho
and ineligibility has laid hold of a
other old timer. On the other har
eight or nine "W" men left over fro
last year's machine, four of them A
Western selections, together with t
best freshmen material of years, gi
the optimists plenty of ground for
championship forecast.

4

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