100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lU IS HIERE FORl YOUI

le

Michigan

Daily

HELP THE MICHIGAN DAILY
BO"ST FOR MICHIGAN

- -

C1V, No. 48. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1913. PRICE FIVE CEN

I

STUDENTS

USPENDED BY
FACULTY'S ACT

Two Riolers Are Expelled While
'third is Placed Under
Surveillance as
Penalty.

aI

'KONE'S OFFENSE OCCURS
MO DAY AFTER PENN RIOT.

Future Charges Will Be Taken Care
of Later at Special
Sessions.
Daniel B. Newton, '17, was suspend-
ed for the entire year; Don T. Mc-
Kone, '17, was suspended for the rest
of the semester, and Marsh B. Wood-
ruff, '17, was placed under surveil-
lance by the faculty of the literary de-
partment, at a special meeting yes-
terday afternoon.
Newton, one of the principals in the
police investigation, ws suspended
because of disorderly conduct at the
Whitney theatre last Saturday night.
Woodruff, who was placed under sur-
veillance with instructions to report
to the dean every month, was a com-
panion to Newton before the riot at
the theatre. The two men visited the
Orient saloon together but later on,
Woodruff was able to secure a ticket
for the play at the Whitney, and in
that way gained legal admittance
to the theatre before the riot.
McKone's offense did not occur the
night of the celebration, but instead
took place last Monday night. The
action in his case, was taken be-
cause of his being intoxicated, and
creating disturbances down town. He
pleaded guilty, in the police court, to
a charge of disorderly conduct.
No other cases were taken up at
the meeting, but should new charges
be made, a special session will be
called. Action was not taken on the
cases of the other men arrested, since
they were not students of the lit de-
partment.
Senator Smith Will Not Talk Here
Senator Hoke Smith of Georgia, has
refused the invitation of the Oratori-
cal association to lecture here, owing
to the press of his duties in Washing-
ton.
ARRESTS FOLLOW
SALE OF LIQUOR
Lawrence J. Damm and George
Schaible, saloon-keepers, were arrest-
ed yesterday afternoon on charges of
selling intoxicating liquors to stu-
dents and minors. On arraignment
before Justice W. G. Doty, the men
waived examination and were bound
over to the December term of the
* circuit court. +
The complaint was filed byChief of
Police John T. Kenny, on informati
furnished by Don T. McKone, '17, who
was arrested last Monday night, and
convicted of charges of disorderly
conduct. Rowland J. Miller, '16, a
compaion of McKone's at that time,
has been subpoenaed as a witness.
Damm was charged with the offense
of selling liquor to students this
spring, and was acquitted on the
grounds of "no cause of action." It
is probable that another test will be
made of the constitutionality of the
law, as both townspeople and univer-
sity authorities are determined to put
a stop to the illegal liquor traffic.

t

COMM1)UNICATION.
(The Michigan Daily assumes no re-
sponsibility for sentiments express-
ed ini commiuniications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
A review of the Student Council by
one of its former officers.
In keeping with the spirit of the
times, the students of Michigan are
trying to govern themselves, and man-
age such things relative to student
life that are not strictly academic, and
which they can direct as well as the
faculty can. Therefore, some years ago
there was organized a student council,
and the scope of the council's work
has been expanding continually. In
the first place the councilmen are
elected from the upperclasses in pro-
portion to the size of the various class-
es, and for a term not to exceed three
semesters. The councilmen give free-
ly of their time, and unlike men on
some of the publications they do not
get credit toward their graduation.
The election system has been criticis-
ed because representative men have
not always been chosen but the fault
lies more with the classes for their
selections, than with the council for
having incompetent men in its make-
up; the system of ethical (non-elec-
tioneering) direct primaries has not
given- universal satisfaction, but no
better plan has been proposed.
The first duty of the council is to see
that class elections are fair, to see
(Continued on page 6.)
YM.CAPROMISES
TRIO OF BIG MEN

NEW COMPOSITION
HAS CHIME MOTIF
Ragtime, Stunts and Popular Song's,
1"ornt Part of Tuesday's
Concert.
TICKETS FINID A. RAPID SALE.
Earl V. Moore, '12, of -the School of
Music faculty, writer of "Varsity," and
various opera hits, has written a new
organ composition especially for the
Glee and Mandolin club's popular
Thanksgiving concert, Tuesday even-
ing in Hill auditorium. The familiar
melody of the library chimes
is the most startling feature
of the number, ,which will
be played on the echo attachment
of the Columbian organ.
Mr. Moore's new piece, it is said, is
even more effective than the selection
on the echo organ introduced at the
Convocation exercises and later at the
Penn mass meeting. The tune of the
chimes is reproduced in a realistic
manner.
Ragtime, stunts and quartet melo-
dies will comprise most of the pro-
gram at Tuesday's concert. Prof. Wil-1
Liam Howland, director of the club,
has arranged the bill so as to include
by far the larger portion of popular
and tuneful selections. "The Midnight
Sons' Quartet" will supply the major
part of the shoulder-shrugging selec-
tions.
Tickets for the concert have sold at
a rapid rate. ' Admission cards are
now on sale at the book stores, or may1
be obtained Monday or Tuesday after-
noons, from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock, at
the box office in Hill auditorium. Tick-
ets for the two balconies sell at '.f
cents, while admission to the mainI
floor is 50 cents. -
MICII IGA N ME N INFLUENTIAL
IN CONSERVATION CONGRESS

SENIOR ENGINEERS
WIN CHAMPIONSHIP

Senior,

Medics Beaten by 12 to
Score in Fiial (lass
Battle.

7

1Q E EN PLAYS STELLAR GA ME.
The senior engineers won the cam-
pus football championship yesterday
afternoon by defeating the junior med-
ics 12 to 7, in the second attempt to
settle this inter-class honor.
The first quarter was an even bat-
tle, and ended with a 0 to 0 score.
In the second quarter the medics
had the better of the boilermakers
long enough to get the ball on the 10
yard line by a thirty yard run by Wen-
ner and a series of line bucks. From
this line Wenner shot a forward pass
to Myll who made a difficult catch be-
hind the goal line for a touchdown.
Lilley kicked goal.
The second half started with a 20
yard run by McQueen immediately af-
ter the kickoff, which place.d the ball
on the medics' 50 yard line. The en-
gineers' backs began a series of line
bucks, putting the ball on the 2 yard
line. Twice the medics held, but on the
third buck McQueen went over. There
was a mixup on the attempt at goal,
and the medics fell on the ball before
McQueen had a chance to boot. The
rest of the quarter was taken up by
exchanging punts.
The fourth quarter started out with
a continuation of the punting in which
the engineers had the better of the
doctors, and they started hitting the
line on the 40 yard mark. McQueen
made 15 through the left side, and then5
Mueller by a terrific smash tore
through the right side for the remain-
ing 25 yards, making the score 12 to 7.
McQueen failed to kick goal.
The engineers, immediately after
the kickoff, intercepted a forward pass
on the 35 yard line. McQueen skirted
left end for 12 yards. A forward pass,
McQueen to Bassett, landed the ball
on the 10 yard mark. McQueen smash-
ed through for five, and Mueller then
plunged to the one yard line where
tho game ended.

STODAY'S FOOTrBALL RESFUS
-o- *
* Harvard 15, Yale 5. *
* Navy 48, New York U. 0.*
Lehigh 7, Lafayette 0.
* Carlisle 35, Syracuse 29. *
* Army 10, Springfield Training
* School 7.*
* Case 47, Kenyon 13. *
* Western Reserve 7, Buchtel 0. *
Chicago 19, Wisconsin 0. *
* Minnesota 19, Illinois 9. *
* Nebraska 12. Iowa 0. *
* Ohio State 58, Northwestern 0. *
Purdue 42, Indiana 7.
Ames'13, Drake 3.
* Missouri 3, Kansas 0. *
* Lake Fiorest 20, Beloit 14. *
* Olivet 13, Alma 0. *
* * * * * * * * * * *
French Play and Cast Not Picked.
That neither the play nor the speak-
ers for the Cercle Francais course of
this year have been picked as yet, was
announced at the .meeting last week.
Mr. R. Talamon, instructor in French,
who has these matters in charge, has
not yet . been able to reach a definite
decision, but the speakers are well in
mind by this time, and it is expected
that it will be- possible to make a defi-
nite announcement in two weeks at
the latest. Since the last meeting of
the Cercle last week, Mr. Talamon
has narrowed his selection for the
play down to three.
FIRST READING F
NEW OPERA DEC. 2

Three. big speakers were announced
last night for the next three meetings
of the University Y. M. C. A., at the
Majestic theater at 6:30 o'clock on
Sundays. Dr. Theodore G. Soares of
Chicago-university will be the speaker
of this evening. Dr. Soares is an em-
inent Spanish professor, who is gen-
erally recognized as the best lecturer
in his university. His subject is "A
Gentleman's Religion."
The speakers who have been secur-
ed for the next two meetings are "Ed."
Mercer, the famous Eastern athlete,
and Graham Taylor of Chicago. Mer-
cer will arrive here on Wednesday,
and speak at a number of fraternities
during the week. He has just spent,
a week's engagement at Cornell where
he was enthusiastically received.
An innovation will be attempted to-
night at the Majestic meeting in the
form of motion pictures, beginning at
6:10 o'clock and running until 6:30
o'clock. It is hoped that in this way
hundreds of men will come to the
evening meeting.
CROSS COUNTRY TEAM TO
- ENTER BELLE ISLE MEET
Entries have been sent from the
University of Michigan for the state
cross country meet, slated for Thanks-
giving day.
This meet is conducted by the De-
troit Y. M. C. A. and will be held over
the course on Belle Isle. The Lan-
sing Aggies and the Ypsi Normalites
are also entered in this competition,
and will send large squads.
The university runners will be sin
shape for this meet, in spite of their
strenuous work against the pick of
the East, yesterday, in New York. It
is expected that at least twenty men
will represent the Yellow and Blue on
this occasion.
The run will start from the Island
athletic house at 9:15 o'clock,. Thanks-
giving morning, and will be over a
course measuring three and one-half
miles.

NEW YORK RA(

DISTANCE MEN
FARE BADLY IN

Michigan's delegation, consisting of
Professors Filibert Roth, and P, S.
Lovejoy, and Regents J. E. Beal and
L. L. Hubbard, to the National Con-
servation Congress, recently held in
Washington, D. C., played a prominent
part in the proceedings. Professor
Roth delivered an address on "Water
Power" and Regent Beal was elected
to the committee on resolutions, the
most important committee of the or-
ganization.
Former students of the forestry de-
partment at Michigan gave a luncheon
in Washington Thursday noon in hon-
or of the committee.
Daily to Be Printed Thanksgiving:
The Michigan Daily Will be printed
as usual on both Thanksgiving morn-
ing and the day following.

UNION FORMULATES SCHEME
FOR ('IIRISTMAS CELEBRATION
A Christmas celebration is being
planned by the Michigan Union for
December 18. Among the suggestions
received are a vaudeville performance
and minstrel show. Whatever plans
are made for the entertainment, the
Union will be thrown open to give
students a final opportunity to gather
before leaving for the Christmas va-
cation.

Principals to Tryout in Two Weeks,
Broilers to Begin
After Recess.
1 1)JERN SETTINGS WILL PREVAIL
At a meeting of the Mimes on Tues-
day, December 2, the Michigan Union
o4era will receive its first reading.
Ray Melton, '13, author, who has been
revising the play with Mr. Bert St.
John, will be present to interpret va-
rious parts of the production. The
book has been printed, and will be
distributed to members of the club.
The first tryouts for the show will
be conducted the week preceding
Christmas vacation. Only aspirants for
positions as principals will be con-t
sidered at this time, and -the chorus
men will be given an opportunity af-
ter vacation. There will be about 17
positions open for speaking parts.
The chorus arrangement will under-
go several changes in the 1914 per-
formance. Last year three sets of cho-
rus men were used, but in this year's
show the number will be cut down,
and will be given more elaborate cos-
tumes than "broilers" have hitherto
been accustomed to. The modern Eu-
ropean setting necessitates an entire-
ly different system in chorus costum-
ing, most of the previous operas hav-
ing had medieval or mythical settings.
There are 14 men working on the
melodies, including many of recog-
nized musical ability. All selections
must be in the hands of the committee
by December 15.
The committee, working on the pro-
duction, expects to make a good start
before Christmas vacation. It is plan-
ned to present the opera in March at
the Whitney theatre.
Prof. Allen Speaks at Union Today.
Prof. J. R. Allen, recently returned
from an extensive trip in Arabia, will
be the speaker on the program this
afternoon at the Union. Prof. Allen
will relate many of his interesting ex-
periences in the far east. Several mu-
sical numbers are on the program, and
the usual refreshments will be serv-
ed.

Cornell Leads Big Field of Crak
Eastern Teams With Harvard
Second and Hassachusetts
Tech.. Third.
ST. BOW) (ll C 1SON CAPTAIN
TAKES INDIVIDUAL IONORS
)iebigan's Score Totals 33 Against
68 Made by Victors and 92
- by harvard.
(Detroit News Service.)
NEW. YORK, Nov. 22.-Handicap-
ped by lack of experience and train-
ing, the Michigan cross country team
fared badly in the ring of crack east-
ern competition, here yesterday. Cor-
nell won the annual intercollegiate
cross country. meet over the Van
Courtland Park course, with Harvard
a distant second, and Massachusetts
Institute of Technology third. The
University of Michigan team trailed
the field, behind eleven other en-
trants.
No remarkalle times were set up in
this sheet, and a comparison of rec-
ords shows the entire field to have
been slower than the standard estab-
lished last year at this time. St.
Bowd, captain of the Harvard squad,
won the individual honors,in the time
of 34.37 min. This mark is 57 sec-
onds behind the record for the course.
The Harvard captain had a lead of
over a hundred yards on the second
man, and he in turn ended thirty
yards ahead of the man that finished
third.
The victors kept their total down to
58, points, as compared with 92 on th
part of Harvard and 103 against Mass-
achusetts Tech. Michigan's total of
points was 335, just two more than
Columbia with 333.
Coach Rowe did not expect that his
proteges would finish in the first di-
vision, but was confident that they
would make a reputable'showing. The
outcome was a revelation to all Mich-
igan followers, and to the Michigan
runners themselves. From the time
(Continued on page 6.)
RIOTERS ARE HELD
ON GRAVER CHARGE
D. B. Newton, '17, J. S. Green, '17E,
I. S. Olson, '16L, W. C. Chipman, and
John Carmody, who appeared before
Justice J. D. Thomas yesterday morn-
ing on charges of creatingdisturbanc-
es in the public streets last Saturday
night, were discharged from custody,
and immediately rearrested on the
charge of riot. On arraignment short-
ly afterward, before Justice Doty, all
but Chipman waived examination and
were bound over to the December
term of circuit court. Chipman was
held to answer to the charge of riot-
ing in the probate court, he being be-
low the age necessary to hold one to
the circuit court. Bail to the amount
of $250 for each, was furnished by
George Wahr and William J. Clarke.
Long before 9:00 o'clock, Justice
Thomas' court was thronged with stu-
dents who wanted to witness the pro-
ceedings. But on motion of Prosecu-
tor George Burke, the cases against
the five were at once dismissed, and
new warrants having been served, ev-
eryone adjourned to Justice Doty's
court. It is probable that the cases
wilk come up before Judge E. D. Kin-
ne the first Monday of December. ^

KISS M3E KID I NEED THE CREDIT

"Smack, smack," and not at the top
step either.
"Umm-um," bear hug, and right on
the campus.
No, student reader, this is no exag-
geration. All the arts of love, its
birth, youth, and blessed evolution are
urged upon the students at M. A. C.
by Professor-emeritus W. J. Beal, of

the botany department.
"Love-making is an art, and should
be learned as a part of your curricu-
lum," he said, in a recent address to
the students. "Do not wait until you
are 35 before you look to the fair sex."
The entire Aggie campus awaits the
4ntroduction of the course, awaits it,
pen in hand, to enroll.

THANKSGIVING SERVICE
IN THE
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
10:30 A. M.
6:30 P. M., C. E. Young people welcomed.

A

Union Guild
Series

'isho

OF DETROIT

illiams

EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
AT-
71145 P. M.

/ ;

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan