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November 21, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-21

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E WHO HAS HIMSELF LIVED
N TEACH LIFE TO OTHERS

Michigan

Daily

i

CONSIDER THE SlIOKER A
WHAT IT CAN TEACH Y(

I

Vol. XXIV, No. 46.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENT;

a
t r

MICHIGAN RANKS
AS DEAN AMONG
STATESCHOOLS
Student Body Has Grown From Six to
Six Thousand In Seventy-
Six Years and is
On Its Way.
The Michigan Daily For Michigan

SCHULTZ TO HELP WISCONSIN
PREPARE FOR CHICAGO GA.
MADISON,I WIS., Nov. 20.-"Germa
ny" Schulz will be here this week, t
help Wisconsin get in shape for the
annual gridiron encounter with Chi-
cago.
"Germany" made a reputation at th
Badger university last fall as a line
coach, and has been called back at the
eleventh hour' to build a stone wal
against the onslaughts of Stagg's prot-
eges. It is expected that he will aid
materially in the team polishing pro-
cess that is going on at Madison this
week.
No arrangements were made by the
athletic authorities to engage Schulz
as special football mentor for the
week. In this light it would appear
that the Michigan star is out simply
becausehe likes to see Chicago hum-
bled and for no financial considera-
tions.
'NOTED REFORMER

E
o.
e
-e
e
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i
-y

COUNCIL SHIPS
LONE STUDENT
FORDISORDER
(ulprit Carried a Box For Fire and
Said, "Let's Get the Cop," But
Was Restrained by
Councilman.
LACK OF QUORUM MAY HOLD
UP FURTHER PROSECUT IO1

SIX MEN LEAVE
TO COMPETE IN
DISTANCE MEET
Wolverine fen Enter Intercollegiate
Cross Country Run For
First Time and Lack
ixperience.
MEN LEAVE IN GOOI) SHAPE
AM) MAY PROVE SURPRISE

Michigan is the mother state univer
sity of the great universities in th
west. From a college consisting o
two small buildings, six students, an
two professors, in 1841, the universit:
has expanded into an institution wit
6002 students upon the rolls of it
eight distinct departments.
The first steps to found a Universi
ty in Michigan were taken in 1826
when Congress reserved a township i
the territory of Michigan for the erec.
tion of a seminary of learning. I
1837 the legislature passed an act t
establish a University of Michigan
and, shortly after, an act was passed
to locate the university at Ann Arbor
With, part of a loan of $100,000 receiv-
ed from the state, four professor's
houses and the two wings of Univer-
sity hall were built upon the campus.
In 1838 the first professorship, that
of botany and zoology, was bestowed
upon Dr. Asa Gray, and three years
later the university was officially
opened with the registration of six
students. In 1845 the degree of Bach-
elor of Arts was conferred upon 11
graduates. The college of medicine
was begun In1850.
Dr. Henry P. Tappan, the first pres-
ident, entered upon his duties in 1852.
During his administration ground for
the observatory was broken and the
chemical laboratory was erected in
1856, In 1859 the law department was
created, with a faculty of three; but
the building, which later contained the
general library, was not erected until
1863. A course in civil engineering
was added in 1855, and in the same
year the degree of Bachelor of Science
was conferred for the first time, Mich-
igan being the second university to
grant that degree.
Dr. Erastus 0. Haven was chosen
till the office left vacant by the res-
ignation of Doctor Tappan in 1863.
The medical building was erected in
the following year, and a course in
pharmacy introduced five years later.
The department ofdpharmacy, howev-
er, was not created until 1876.
In 1869 Dr. Henry S. Frieze suc-
ceeded Doctor Haven as acting presi-
dent for a period of three years. Dur-
ing his administration women were
admitted to the university for the first
time.
Dr. James Burril Angell, Michigan's
grand old man, was called from the
University, of Vermont to the presi-
dency in 1871, and his administration
of 38 years marked the rapid expan-
sion of the university. In the first
year of his administration, President
Angell laid the corner stone of Uni-
versity hall, which was not completed
until 1873. During his term of office
President Angell added four new col-
leges: those of pharmacy, homeopa-
thy, ,Rental-surgery and engineering.
He witnessed the erection of nu-
merous buildings. First the homeo-
pathic building was erected in 1879,
and the first hospital In 1875. In 1879
the museum was erected and it was
followed by the building of the libra-
ry in 1883. The engineering building
was completed three years later. The
new homeopathic hospital was built in
1900, and the medical hospital, three
years later. Waterman gymnasium1
was built in 1894 and Barbour gymna-
slum followed three years later. Ferry
field was laid out in 1902, and the same
year West Hall was erected. The new
chemistry building, erected in 1908,
was the last building to be placed on
the campus. In 1909 President An-
gell retired as president emeritus, and
was succeeded by Dr. Harry B. Hutch-.
ins, dean of the law department, whose
administration is now in the making.

University, Council and Police
Working Independent of
Each Other.

Are I Iope

on Race Gives Chances to
nell, Pennsylvania and
Harvard.

Cor-

One student, who was found guilty
of taking part in the riot last Saturday
night, was suspended for the rest of
the semester, by the student council at
its special meeting Wednesday.The res-
olution, which was passed, was word-
ed to the effect that "he be suspended
for the rest of the semester, notifica-
tion to be withheld for a week."
The grounds for taking the action
were reduced to four: for being intox-

TO TALK TONIGHTI

Will Be Second Lecture of Series icated, for carrying a box for the fire
Arranged by Oratorical for saying "let's get the cop," which
Association. he was prevented from doing by the
action of a student councilman, and
JACOB A. RiIS, ON "MY NEIGHBOR' for being disorderly and acting as a
ringleader of the mob around the bon-
Jacob A. Riis, the noted philanthro- fires. His presence at either the Whit.
pist and author, will lecture in Univer- pey theater or the jail, at the time of
these riots, was not proven.
sity Hall tonight at 8:00 o'clock, under At the meeting called for last night,
the auspices of the Oratorical associa- only ten of the councilmen were pres-
tion. For this occasion, he has select- ent out of a membership of 23, and as
ed as a subject "My Neighbor," one the required quorum of one-half was
of Is most popular lectures. not present, the council adjourned
Mr. Riifs is widely known as a great without taking any further action
New York slum worker. As a report- along disciplinary lines. Practically
er on the New York Sun and writer of all of the members who were present,
many books dealing with slum condi- were those who are working hard for
tions among which are "How the Oth- the conviction of some of the rioters.
er lalf Lives," "The Battle With the The absentees, in the main, were con-
Slums," "Children of the Tenements," servatives in the Monday night con-
Mr. Riis has exerted a mighty influ- demnation proceedings. As absences
ence toward the betterment of New are not counted in these special meet-
York's poor. He is a close friend of ings, so that the members are not in
Theodore Roosevelt about whom he danger of losing their seats, it looks
has written the book,"Theodore Roose- as though further action will be block-
velt, the Citizen." ed by non-attendance. Another at-
Mr. Riis is an interesting, instruct- tempt to do something, will be made
ive, amusing speaker, and puts a lot tonight, at a meeting which has been
of pep in his lectures. He is a practi- called for 7:30 o'clock.
cal reformer and has remedies for the Two students, against whom charges
evil conditions he pictures. On the ex had been preferred, and who had been
tended lecture tour he is now making, summoned to appear before the coun-
he has been well received without ex- cil, failed to come. One pleaded an
ception. important engagement, and the other
Admission will be by regular course could not be located. Pressure will
tickets or 50 cent tickets sold at the be exerted to compel their attendance
box office. Thisnis the second lecture at the meeting tonight.
given by the Oratorical associatio- The university authorities are inves-
this year. The next lecture on th- I tigating the riot independently of both
program is by Dr. Newell Dwight Hil the police and the student council.

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Michigan's cross country team, six
strong, and under the care of Coach
Floyd Rowe, left for New York City
last night at 9:30 o'clock, to compete
in the intercollegiate cross country
meet, tomorrow afternoon. Only five
of these men will be expected to carry
the Michigan colors in the run, but a
sixth is carried as a substitute. Capt.
Brown, Young, Trelfax, Shapiro, and
Fox made up the regular quintet, while
Terry is carried as an alternate.
The Wolverine distance pacers did
not work out yesterday even to the ex-
tent of getting into track suits. As
their opportunities for practice in New
York will be limited, it is unlikely
that they will do any more than lim-
ber up today. The trainer has had
this in mind for the past week, and
regulated their daily work outs, so
that the two days' rest will have no
bad effects on the quality of fight that
they can produce Saturday. Every
man was in trim for the big race when
the train took them away from Ann
Arbor, last night, and are hoping to
better their previous records, to the
extent of dropping a little surprise
on their Eastern opponents.
Past performances of the year in
cross country running would seem to
indicate that Cornell, Pennsylvania.
and Harvard will force the race into a
triangular issue with themselves as
the leading contenders.-
Capt. Brown is a runner who would
show well with the best that the East;
can put forward, but the other mem-
bers of the team are competing in in-
tercollegiates for the first time, and
lack the experience and training ofl
their leader. None of them are will-
ing to admit that they have not some
chance of ending in the first division,1
but ,have made up their minds that,
they are in shape to do their best, and1
that this same best may startle even
their supporters.
The course for the intercollegiate1
affair this year is in Van Cortland
Park, in the heart 'of New York City.
The starting gun will be fired at 2:30
o'clock Saturday afternoon, and all
the runners should be across the tapeI
well under three-quarters of an hour.

CHINESE ACTOR MAKES HIT
AS SILYLOCK'S HIRED MAN
"The Merchant of Venice," present
ed last night by Professor Thomas C
Trueblood's class in Shakespearean
reading was well received. Angell hal
was well filled, about 600 people being
present.
The hit of the evening was made in
the comic scene between Laucelo
Gabbo and his father, Y. F. J. Hsu, '14
playing the part of the younger Gab
bo and J. Stewart Lathers, Professo
of Oratory, in the State Normal Schoo
at Ypsilanti, who is now pursuing
graduate work here, in the role of the
elder Gabbo, kept the audience in a
state of continuous uproar. Ethel A
Kenyon, '14, made a charming Portia
in the casket scene. The character of
Shylock was wellV taken by Kenneth
Kuhn, '14, and L. W. Lisle, '14. The
court scene was well done with Miss
C. B. Sites as Portia and J. S. Lathers
as Shylock.
CLASS TEAMS TO
MEET TOMORROW
Both Teams Have New Plays to Spring
in Second Clash For
Championship.
_I'QUEEN AND WENNER MAY STAR
Senior engineers and junior medics
will attempt to settle the campus foot-
ball championship, tomorrow after-
noon. The teams opposed each other
last Saturday, but neither eleven was
able to score so the game went to a
0 to 0 tie.
Both aggregations have been work-
ing hard all week, and have perfected
many new plays that will be uncorked
in the final clash of the year. These
teams are two of the strongest class
elevens that have battled on Ferry
field in some time, and every rooter
that witnessed the struggle last Sat-
urday can have no doubts of the equal-
ity of their strength.
For the engineers, McQueen is looked
upon as the man who will find the
holes in the medics defense enough
times to win the championship. Wen-
ner, a former Varsity recruit, will
again be at half for the medics, and
the speedy back is expected to give
the engineers the most trouble.
The backfield men of both teams,
however, have displayed, much speed
and strength during the season and
are all considered dangerous. On the
line the teams are well matched. The
weight is equally divided, and all the
iuskies have had experience on the
gridiron.
I)r. Coryell Addresses Southerners.
Dr. Coryell, of Baltimore, Md., a
graduate of the University of Virginia,
and who is visiting Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, addressed the members of the
Dixie club at their smoker at the Un-
ion last night. He spoke on the chang-
ing attitude of the south towards the
orth. The program also included
everal musical numbers and a talk by
Edward Haislip, '14L.
STUDENTS MAYGET
- f
COOPERATIVE SHOP'
Michigan has prospects of a real co-
perative store similar to those at
-larvard, Wisconsin and Cornell. Wer-
er Schroeder, '14, is heading a move-
nent for considering the feasibility of

the project. "The chief difficulty is in
ecuring the capital and devising
nethods of operating," says Mr.
Schroeder.
A successful co-operative associa-
ion was formed last year, the mem-
bers of which received a discount
rom different stores in town.
Professor Edward D. Jones, of the
ommerce and industry department,
formerly of Wisconsin, says the store
here has been operated for 15 years.
student stockholders choose the direc-
ors from among themselves and the
aculty to manage the business. Books
aid student supplies are handled. No
pposition is raised by cutting prices
but each stockholder receives a divi-
lend according to his purchases.

DETROIT GRADS
SWILL DO HONOR
TO GRID HEROES
t Many Students Are Expected to Attend
' Smoker at Hotel Tuller,
-Detroit, Saturday.
r Night.
icHICHGAN'S PEERLESS BAND *
WILL ADD ZEST TO OCCASION
- Judge Murfin, Captain Paterson, Edgar
Guest, and Fred Lawton
f Will Speak.
Though Michigan's 1913 football
team appeared for the last time before
an Ann Arbor audience Tuesday even-
ing at the Michigan Union smoker, the
team has yet one more appearance to
make. On Saturday evening of this
week, the team, together with the Var-
sity band, will be the guest of the Uni-
versity of Michigan club at Detroit.
The team and band members will be
the club's guests at dinner at the Hotel
Tuller, and following the diner a smo-
ker will be held to which all Univer-
sity of Michigan men, graduates or
undergraduates, are invited. The com-
mittee in charge of the entertainment
headed by C. B. DuCharme, has insur-
ed an interesting program. Judge J.
D. Murfin, Captain George C. Paterson,
and others are scheduled to spehk.
Edgar A. Guest, funny man of the De-
troit Free Press will give some of his
original verses, while J. Fred Lawton
has consented to give his imitation of
Coach Fielding H. Yost watching the
team in action. The Varsity band will.
furnish music, and moving pictures of
the Michigan-Cornell game will be
shown.
It is probable that the Michigan
team and band members will leave
Saturday afternoon at 4:50 o'clock in
a body, and will go directly to the
Tuller for dinner. The students who
lesire to attend the smoker will prob-
ably leave for Detroit at various times
during the day. From present indica-
tions, a large number of undergradu-
ates plan to attend the smoker.
Thirty-eight members of the Varsity
band will make the trip to Detroit
tomorrow evening as guests of the De-
troit Alumni Association. Members
of the association, who have seen the
rejuvenated band in action, declare
hat no Michigan celebration would be
complete without them. Manager S. J,
Hoexter, will in all probability ac-
company the men.
PROF. KNOWLTON ADDRESSES
WOOLSACK AT ITS INITIATION
"The College Home' was the sub-
ject of a talk by Prof. J. C. Knowlton
of the law department last evening at
the fall initiation of Woolsack, honor
law society, at the -Uinon. Henry C.
Bogle acted as toastmaster.
Next Gargoyle Will Be Food Number.
Plans for the next issue of the Gar-
goyle were discussed at a meeting of
the staff yesterday afternoon. Thisi s-
sue, to appear December 13, will be
the Food Number and- will be concern-
ed mainly with subjects appropriate
to the nearing holidays. All copy for
this number must be in by December.
1.
COMMUNICATION.

(The Michigan Daily assumes no re-
sponsibility for sentiments express-
ed in communications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
I am very sorry for the public dis-
cussion that has followed the election
of the Varsity football captaincy for
1914. I should not be truthful to say
that there has been no dis-
appointment in losing so great
an honor as the captaincy,
but such a disappointment as
there may be, is my personal affair.
I did not start the public discussion
or contribute to it. I hope it will stop
right now. For myself I wish to say
only that I will give Michigan the best
service that is in me next fall, under
Captain Raynsford, if- I can make the
team.
EARNEST F. HUGHITT.

lis, successor of Henry Ward Beecher,
as pastor of Plymouth Church, Brook-
lyn, on December 1.
Old Daily Man Talks on Law oz Libel
Walter K. Towers, '12L, assistant
editor of the American Boy, gave an
interesting talk before Prof. Scott's
class in journalism yesterday morning.
FACULTY TO HELP
ON NEW CHARTER
At a meeting of a sub-committee of
the Ann Arbor civic association yester-
day afternoon the advisability of the
adoption of a commission form of
government for the city was consider-
ed. Professor Robert T. Crane, of the
political science department, is one of
the men in the university who have
been retained by the civic association
to assist them in determining the ad-
visability of taking this step. Ann
Arbor's present charter, its operation
and limitations, were reviewed to some
extent though not in detail. A reso-
lution at the conclusion was tendered
by E. W. Groves in which he advoca-
ted the substitution of a commission
form of government ih place of the
present civic rule.
At a joint meeting of the various
committees last night the commission
form in general throughout the United
States was presented by Professor
Jesse S. Reeves of the political science
department and Professor Willis G.
Stoner of the law department.

." {torney Arthur Brown has been re-
tained by D. Newton, '17, and J. S.
Green, '17E, who were arrested dur-
ing the disturbances. L. S. Olson had
not obtained any attorney up to last
night.

BARRISTERS FAVOR CLOSING DANCE REGULATIONS ARE
ALL DANCES AT MIDNIGHT. )TO BE DRAWN UP MONDAY.

At a luncheon given by Barristers,
honor law society, yesterday noon at
the Union, the members. declared in
favor of closing all mid-week parties
at midnight and also in starting fes-
tivities earlier.
Chemistry Students Plan Detroit Trip
About 100 students of the chemical
engineering department, will go to De-
troit Saturday, for an inspection of a
number of manufacturing plants there,
and in neighboring towns. They will
visit the limestone quarry at Sibley;
the sandstone brick plant, also at Sib-
ley; the Solvay coke oven plant at
Delray; and .the plant of the Detroit
Iron and Steel Co. at Kug Island, Del-
ray.

Resolutions relative to closing danc-
es at midnight will be drawn up by
the student representatives Monday.
The matter of chaperones and better
music will also receive attention.
These resolutions will be presented to
the non-athletic committee at its next
meeting. This was the only action
taken at a meeting of the student com-
mittee, at the Union, yesterday after-
noon.
In the meanwhile an effort will be
made to ascertain the exact feeling of
the classes and the campus societies in
regard to this evolution in dancing.
The resolutions will express ther opin-
ions. The meeting Monday will be at
the Union at 4:00 o'clock in the af-
ternoon.

Al

Next Tuesday Night
O0

Hill Auditorium I

PULAR

Thanksgiving Concert
Mich. Glee and Mandolin Club
Seats 25c.; Some 50c. Sale at Bookstores

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