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November 19, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-19

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PROVEN GUILTY.

'he

Michigan

Daily

Jrj

I

SAVAG~E STUDE

F

Vol. XXIV, No. 44. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1913. PRICE FIVE CE

POST SE SON
SMOKER RINGS
NEW TRADITION
Nineleen Gridiron Men Presented
With "M" Certificates at Annual
Union Football
Smoker.
JU)DE THOMSON AND SENATOR
TOWNSEND ADDRESS THRONG
Prof, Henderson Represents Faculty;
Karl Mohr Speaks For
Student Body.
Captain George Paterson received
the first football "M" certificate ever
awarded last night. The occasion was
the annual post-season smoker, and

KEEN COMPETITION MARKS
PREPARATION FOR PEBATES I
Unusually keen competition for the
Varsity debating team is marking the
preparation of the various society
teams for interdepartmental contests,
to be held the first of next week. These
contests will determine.both the cam-
pus championship, and the personnel
of the two teams to represent Michi-
gan in the Central Debating League
contests, with Chicago and North-
western.;

SOME TASK!

Jeffersonian is scheduled to meet
Adelphi on the 25th of this month,
while Webster and Alpha Nu will
clash on the 26th. The six men who
make the best showing in these twd
debates will be picked for the Varsity
debating team. bach of the six men
chosen will receive his share of the
Old's prize, $50.00, and an Alger Gold
Medal.
Mr. Ray K. Immel, instructor in or-
atory, who has charge of the prelimi-
naries, spoke enthusiastically'of the
quality of the teams representing the
different societies this year. Among
those who will compete are: L. S.
Hulbert, '14L, former member of the
Varsity debating teamn, L. D. :David,
'14-'16L, who last year won the Ham-
ilton Oratcrical contest, J. M. Ste-
vens, '16L, formerly on the Varsity
debating team of Colgate University,
G. H. Klinger, .'15, formerly on the
Varsity debating team of the Universi-
ty of Colorado.

the place was Waterman gymnasium.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, introduced
as "the campus dean, the dean of
deans," presented the certificates to
19 Varsity athletes of 1913.
Before 7:00 o'clock men were lined
up at Barbour gymnasium, and by
7:30 o'clock the gym was packed with
an enthusiastic crowd. When the band
played the "pep" overture at 8:00
o'clock nearly 2,500 men had jammed
into the Waterman gymnasium.
"Keeper of the Big Grin," and "Cur-
ator of the Big Handshake" are the
degrees which I would like to have
conferred upon me," said Judge Rob-
ert F. Thomson, '92L. "Serving in
lowly places, helping along, financing
the fellow who ,is broke, making the
fellow smile who would otherwise sob,
these are some of the things that
Michigan men may do. The spectacu-
lar doesn't count. First of all, be will-
ing hearts and arms in the rear ranks
of Michigan's human service corps."
"Don't think you did it all," he said,
speaking to the football men, "it is all
Michigan, Michigan 40 years ago, and
down to the present tinie. Football
demonstrates the efficiency and abso-
lute necessity of the graduate coach
system."
"In the United States Senate there
are more men who. attended the Uni-
versity of Michigan than any other
educational institution of the country,"
said Senator Charles E. Townsend.
"In my judgement," he added, Michi-
gan is the greatest university in the
world."
Prof. William D. Henderson, who
opened the program with a talk full of
anecdotes, pointed out the importance
of habit forming in life, exemplified
by football.
"Tonight we do not admit that there
is a better team on earth," said Karl
Mohr, '13-'15L, the student speaker.
In conclusion he said, "Winning games
is a tradition, and celebrating games is
also a tradition, which we should make
bigger, noisier but cleaner."
The Varsity band, and the mandolin
and glee club furnished music, and
Selden Dickinson, '13-15L, presided, in
his capacity of president of the Union.
Edward Saier, '13-'15L, was general
chairman, and Carroll Haff, '15L, led
the yells.
Lyndon at the lantern threw pictur-
es of the team on the screen as well
as the cartoons submitted in the Un-
ion contest. The first prize was award-
ed to Harold Abbott, '15E, Edward Mc-
Guire, '16, and C. Smith, '17, received
second and third honors respectively.
The awarding of the "M" certificates
aroused most enthusiasm. Each man
erceived his "diploma" with a hand-
shake from Dean Cooley and a thun-
derous "Yea" led by "Hap" Haff. Cap-
tain Paterson gave the crowd a short
talk, after much urging.
ALUMNI DONATE FUNDS FOR
OCCASIONAL MUSEUM PAPERS
"Occasional Papers of the Museum
of Zoology," a publication edited by
A. G. Ruthvin, curator f the Museum,
will appear throughout the year, as
the result of an endowment by two
Detroit alumni, Dr. Bryant Walker
and Bradshaw H. Swales.
Short scientific papers, by members
of the museum staff, will appear in
pamphlet form, each paper being a
separate issue. Of the many papers+
prepared during the year, 20 will be
selected for publication.

COUNCIL VOTES TOt
INVESTIGATE RIOT
Students, Not Apprehended by Police,
Are to Be Tried by Board.
Explains Action.
ORGE WITNESSES COOPERATION,
Student council investigation of the
riot which occurred down town last
Saturday night, will begin at a special
meeting of that body tonight, when
three students, not apprehended by the
police, will be brought before the
council to answer to the charge of ri-
oting. If found guilty, no delay will
be shown in dealing out summary.
punishment,- which in most cases,
will probably be dismissal from the

Senior Lits Ieet Soph Medics Today
On account of wet grounds, the in-
terclass football game between the
senior lits and the soph medics sched-
uled for yesterday was postponed un-
til this afternoon at 4:05 o'clock.
CLASSES DESIRE
'WEE, HUR' 11DANCES
Class dances may not fall under the
ban of those dances which are to cease
at midnight. Class presidents of the
various departments, interviewed last
night, say that the prevailing spirit
among the class members seems to fa-
vor a continuation of the present reg-
ime.
Recent agitation on the part of the
non-athletic committee, to advance a
moral uplift among the student body,
seems to have collapsed before the
committee, formed to report on the
matter has been appointed.
Campus societies, when questioned,
were decidedly in favor of retaining
their traditional dances, with little
consideration for the classes. The
classes yesterday made their stand
clear; they also want their respective
dances.
There is to be a meeting of the stu-
dent committee with the non-athletic
committee to act officially on the mat-
ter. The meeting will be called by
Professor A. H. Lloyd in the near fu-
ture.
ALUMNAE MAY APPEAR IN
ANN ARBOR 10 GIVE RECITAL
Mrs. Maurice Brown, '04, of Chica-
go, an imitative interpreter of mod-
ern plays, is contemplating a public
appearance in Ann Arbor in the near
future. Mrs. Brown was formerly
Nellie Van Volkenburg, and was a
member of the dramatic club while in
the university.
Miss Brown appeared in a series of
three one-act plays on the opening
night of the current theatrical season
of the Little Theatre in Chicago. These
plays are all of the very highest class,
and are not at all of the popular type.I
One of them was written by A. Martyn
Johnson, '05, who took a leading part1
in it.
CIVIC ASSOCIATION WILL
UNDERTAKE SOCIAL SUFRVEY
----e-
The Ann Arbor Civic association is
preparing to take a social survey of
Ann Arbor. One of the first things]
to be taken up by the committee,3
which was appointed Monday night,
by the council, is a house to house1
canvass to ascertain the extent of tu-
berculosis, and to take steps in ac-#
cordance with the results. The hous-
ing problem will then be taken up and
a report made to the Civic association.r

university.
To make the probe effective, the
council wishes to punish as many riot-
ers as possible, and with that end in
view, urges every one who was a wit-
ness at the scenes of disturbances, to
bring names of revelers to the atten-
tion of the council. This action was
determined upon, by the passage of
a resolution at a special meeting yes-
terday afternoon, to the effect, that
"the council will begin the trial of
students against whom charges have
been preferred, on Wednesday even-
ing, November 19, at 8:00 o'clock. New
charges will be gladly received at that
time."
Feeling that its status on the matter
has not been stated correctly the coun-
cil passed the following resolution to
make its position clear:
"Resolved,-that the council thought
there was no adequate place for a cel-
ebration Saturday night, and that the
council considered the advisability of
holding a mass meeting after the
game, but decided that that would be
a method of . starting riotous gangs,
and that after consideration, the coun-
cil did what seined best to them to
prevent such conduct, and protect the
name of the student body before the
people of the state. That the council
believes that had such a celebration
occurred, the riot would have been
worse, and more destructive to other
parts of the city
"That the council feels that the pur-
pose for which it was elected, was
not to police the classes, but to plan
the activities of the student body.
"So the council is willing to take up
any information that is put in their
hands, in order to make definite the
campus sentiment on such action, but,
that the council does not feel that it
is to fill the position, of college proc-
tors, who are officers of the law.
"But the council does strongly dis-
approve the actions of the students,
and believes that council members as
upperclassmen, but not as a body, are
responsible, and is anxious to see that
punishment is meted out to the pro-
mnoters of the outrage on Saturday
night, and asks that such information
be brought to its hands."
No developments have occurred in
the prosecution of revelers by either
the civil or university authorities.I
Counsel for the students arrested, had
not been engaged up to last night.

DISTANCE. RUNNERS
PREPARE FOR EAST
Cross Country Men Work Overtime to
Be in Condition For New
York Meet.
SIX ATHLETES LEAVE TOMORROW
With the eastern cross country meet
coming at the end of the week, Cap-
tain Brown and his squad of distance
men are putting forth every effort to
be in the best of shape. The team of
six men, accompanied by Trainer Far-
rell leaves for New York, tomorrow
night, so that only two more practices
remain for conditioning purposes.
The race is to be held in Van Court-
land Park, in the center of New York
city, over a course of three miles, to
be circled twice. The local run, tak-
en by the Ann Arbor men in the daily
workout, is only four miles in length,
but fcr the past few days, a little more
has been added to fit them for the
longer stretch in the East.
It was a disappointment to the Mich-
igan men to be defeated by the run-
ners from the Detroit "Y," and the
men that make the week-end trip will
be on their mettle to retrieve themselv-
es in the eyes of their captain and
trainer.
COLOIBIAN BANKER MAKES
LONG TRIP TO VISIT SON.
After travelling 7,000 miles from
Cali, Colombia, Mr. Rasaen Bonilla,
famous banker, is visiting his son,
John Bonilla, '15M, president of the
Cosmopolitan club. This is the first
time he has seen his son since the
young leader of cosmopolitanism left
his home, seven years ago. Mr. Bonil-
la arived in town yesterday, and will
stay for more than a week.
"1 fell in love with this country the
moment I landed in America," said
Mr. Bonilla yesterday. "I think this is
a wonderful country in economic de-
velopment. Although I have not made
a thorough study of this university,
from what I learned from both my
sons, I am convinced that Michigan is
satisfactory in every way.
The South American banker will ad-
dress the meeting of the Cosmopolitan
club in Spanish, at 7:30 o'clock Friday
evening in McMillan hall, while his
son will -interpret his words into' En-
glish.
Acacia House Will Soon Be Completed
The new"Acacia"fraternity house will
be ready for occupancy about January
1, -1914. The exterior of the building
is practically completed, and the
plumbing, heating, and lighting sys-
tems are well under way. The inside
work of decorating and painting will
follow the completion of the lighting
system.
Student Makes New Climbing Record.
An article was published in the
Ford Times giving a description of a
race up Pike's Peak against time in
which o. W. Hall, '15E, with his little
car lowered the world's 'record for'
mountain climbing by 45 minutes. His
time was 2 hours and 36 minutes. {

SENIOR LITS TO HOLD FIRST
DINNER OF SERIES TONIGHT
Senior lits will hold the first of a
series of dinners at 6:00 o'clock at the
Union tonight. Speeches by the pres-
idents of the class in the three last
years will feature the program. Pres.
Waldo Fellows will preside as toast-
master, and Prof. R. M. Wenley of the
philosophy department is scheduled
as the chief speaker.
The presidents of the class in form-
er years who are to speak, are: Harold
Schradzki, president in the freshman
year, Guy L. Woolfolk, sophomore
president, and H. B. Carpenter, junior
president.
Music will be fatnished by Ralph
Conger and Bruce Miles. Tilets for
the entire number of dinners, which
sell for $2.50, may be secured from
members of the social compittee.
MICHIGAN'S LAPEL BUTTON
NOT LIKE 'HAT OF UNION.
No conflict with the Union lapel but-
ton will be experienced by' the new
official university badge adopted by
the regents, at their last meeting, The
ncw button is simply a public express-
sion of affiliation with the university,
to fulfill a demand which was felt at
the 75th anniversary, a year ago.
Alumni and university delegates
have long felt that such a button ought
to exist. The pin is about the size of
a cent, with a gold background and a
blue "M." On the outer edge appear
the words, University of Michigan.
Professor Emil Lorch, of the architec-
ture department, designer of the
badge, expects to make a few minor
changes before the pin is put into use.
CHOOSE TENTATIVE
"SCARECROW"CAST.
The tentative cast of 16, which will
take part in the Comedy club's pro-
duction of the "Scarecrow," next De-
cember, contains the following names:
Waldo Fellows, L. K. Friedman, B. D.
Welling, Gordon Eldredge, Owen Win-
ters, L. M. Cunningham, Harold Nut-
ting, Thomas Murphy, Phyllis Povah,
Mary True, Louise Robson, F. L. Hick-
ok. The present members of the tem-
porary cast were chosen on the basis
of their past reputations,and the show-
ings made in the tryouts. For this
reason no permanent positions have
been awarded, and the personnel of
the players will be liable to changes
up to within 10 days of the time of
giving the regular performance.
This new method was forced upon
the executive committee of the club by
the serious losses which the club suf-
fered last year, by graduation, and thei
failure of some of the stars to return.;
Birney and Kiscadden were lost;
through graduation, Clayton and Tur-E
pin failed to return, and Arthur Cc-,
hen and Isabelle Reizer plead a stress1
of college work, as their excuse forI
being unable to appear in the cast
this year.
COACH YOST WILL WITNESS
YALE-HARVARD CONFLICT
Fielding H. Yost, coach of the Mich-
igan Varsity football team, and one off
the most prominent football authori-t
ties in the United States, will watch
the Yale-Harvard game from the side-
lines at Cambridge Saturday. On
Thanksgiving Day Yost will take in

WITH STUI

Holiday Harmony and PopularQi
let Music Will Feature Concei
By Combined
Clubs.
EARL MOORE WILL FEATURE
SELECTION ON ORGAN CH
Tickets Are on Sale at Wahr's
Sheeba's at Popular Price
of 20 Cents
Lively melodies of the whistling
riety, stunts and features, pop
quartet harmony, and special holi
music will feature the big Tha
giving concert, to be given by
Glee and Mandolin club, next Tues
evening, in Hill auditorium.
New specialties,, to be used on1
Pacific coast trip of the club,will
introduced for the first time. The
gram will be entirely'popular.
"The Midnight Sons' Quartet,"
tamed exponents. of the anti-class
and ultra-ragtime, will occupy a n
jor position on the bill. The epm
quartet responded to a's. many a
dozen encores several times last y
and this record is expected to go
the boards next Tuesday. The rei
Loire will be up-to-the-second.
Earl Moore will play a novel se
tion on the echo organ chimes as
added feature. Waldo' Fellows,
and Alfred Williams, '14E, will furr
a large portion of the comedy,
Nearly 150 men have tried out
the 1913-'14 Glee club, and as a re
of this great range of material,
present group of harmony dspng
is considered by Prof. William I
land, conductor, as the best ever,
sembled at Michigan. The Mand
;lub has been rejuvenated by the
quisition of several "kings of
strings," and it is expected that
instrumental part of the program
arouse more than ordinary enthi
asm.
Popular prices, as well as popn]
pieces, will prevail. Tickets at
cents, with a few at 50 cents, are r
on sale at Wahr's and Sheehan's.
COURSE IN AERONAUTICS TO
HOLD FIRST CLASS SATURD
The first class in aeronautics
meet Saturday afternoon at 1
o'clock. Commencing this week A
club meetings will be held every 1
urday afternoon and they will be c
ducted as a regular course in
study of aviation. W. B. K6pfer, '
his prepared a series of lectures fr
a book written by a prominent Fre
authority, and he will have ch
of these meetings, formulating
course from the French text. Part
the time will be spent in discus4
flying machines, and certain hours 3
be used in experimenting in the 1
oratory.
A member of the enginering fact
will be present at all of the disc
sions, as final authority on any qu
tion in dispute. This course is not
thorized, and those taking it will
ceive no credit, but they will be b
ter prepared to take up the work
a course is offered next year.
--.-
VARSITY MEN WILL HECEIVE
"M" HATS INSTEAD OF "i" CA

MUSICAL MEN
WILL APPEAl

the Army-Navy game at New York.
It is stated that Walter Camp, dean According to a decision of the

of eastern football critics, will confer'
with Yost before picking his All-
American teams.
DEAN M. E. COOLEY SPEAKS
TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
Dean M.E. Cooley, of the engineering
department, addressed the students of
the high school, in chapel yesterday.
He spoke principally' on the advantag-
es that the student of today has that
students did not have when he was a
boy. He stated that the reason that
many men fail in college work is that
they lack the ability to apply them-
selves to the task in hand. He also
blamed the great number of diversions
in the school life for the lack of con-
centration.

of directors of the Athletic assoc
tion, the Varsity cap is to be suppla
ed by a Varsity hat. The proposed
is of the 'soft, close fitting style. It
to be lettered-similar to the cap. Ma
eastern universities award hats
stead of caps, and as the -Michig
Varsity caps are out of date so far
style is concerned, and a bit inconv
ient to wear as well, it is believed1
new Varsity head gear will meet w
favor.
During the Christmas holidays, s
eral members of the society are pl:
ning to remain in Ann Arbor a
build a new glider. The present one
too heavy for long flights, but ti
have plans for building a glid-er w
much less weight.

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