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November 18, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-18

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No. 43,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVMBAIER 18, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

Y ELECT

YNSFORD AS

1014 CHIEFTAIN
I hoiee Conmes pis Sur'prise to CaImpuis
ais Iughilt Was Conceded
Favorite With
Students.
RAY lNSFORD PLA1YEI) AT E:-ND
ANI) HAS TWVICE WON AN "31"
Iist of Meta Who ReceeSrub Letter
For Their Services Will
Total 29.
James W. Raynsford, '1511, will cap-
tainl Michigan's 1914 Varsity football
team. Ray-nsforci was elected at at

TilE FOOT1BALL "N" LIST
'UO1:19f1.*
George C. Paterson, '14E, (Cap-*
tain.)
Ernest J: Allmending;er, '14.
Miller Fl., Pontius, '14L.
Jamey 13. Craig, '14E. #
Roy H. Torbet, '14.
James C. Musser, '14L.
Ernest F. Hughitt, '15E.*
James W. Raynsford, '15E.
Cyril Quinn, '14.*
Thomas 'R. Bushnell, Jr,, '15E.
Martin H-. Gait, '154.
John J. Lyons, '15E. #
Henry W. Lichitner, '14E.*
Roice A. Traphagen, '16. #
William 1). Cochran, '16 Phar. *
James B. Catlett, '15.
Frank Mcllale, '16L.
EftonM., James,.'15.*
S. Spencer Scott, '14 Phar.

MIDNIGHT MAY

GREAT, NUMBER
WILL COME TO

r

m

*

BE CURFEW AT
FUTURE DANCES

UNION SMOKER,

Honor Societies Fa-vor Regul~ation
;tl it Dnces Except Those
'Which Are Held as

* * .* * *

of l''i)t

* * * *

St utents ExPeceted to Witness
C'eremony of Giving e"Ms,
to Yost's Varsity
"Warriors.

K
1*

FOOTBALL S~I1OKER TONWHT *
Place-Waterman gymnasium. *
Time-8:00 o'clock.
Admission-25 cents. Tickets #
may be purchased at the' Mich-*
igan Union. None will be sold*
at the door.
Barbour gymnasium open at '
7:00 o'clock.*
Waterman gymnasium open at*
7:301 o'clock.
Crowd must enter through Bar-*
bour gymnasium.*

GIVE PLEAS I
,NOT GUILTY

It

RIOTCHARI
Is Stated Thiat the Authori
Now Considering Change
Charge to On1e.of~

N O'-ATHLETIC COMMITTEEI'
HAKES MANY SUGMI'ESTIONS-
oint Committee Considers Regilationsj
for Dances Given by AiU
Organizations,

PILES OF TORACCO AND LOTS
OF CIDER, WILL RE ON HAND
}frograsp Will Consist of Speeches' byj
P'rominent Men and Short'
Band Concert.a

Aluminus Will Stildy Art InI Chlicago.
Arthur E. Curtiss, '11, recently of
the Flint Journal, has gone to Chica-
go to study art and to continue news-
pap er work. Curtiss was president
of the 1911 class in his senior year.

VERDICT OF CIVIL COURT TO
PRECEDE ACTION BYT FACU
Student Council Took Many Pr(
tioii; to Prevent Lanlessness
In 'Celebration.
On arraignmnet before Justice
D. Thomas yesterday morning.

Dancing after m tdnight 14s a14 to be M[ichigan's football wiarriors of 1913
doomed. Student sentiment, 4i char= will receive certificates for their "Ms"
acterized by camhpus spc~etie , favors tonight in the Presence of 2,500 Mich-
the cessation of all danveulg ft mid= igauj men at the greatest post-season
night except for those dipnes i 01ch i "smoke-session" ever held in Ann Ar-

meeting of the 1913 team, hield yester-
day noon after the taking of the an-
nual football picture, by vote of the
19 mien who will receive certificates
for the Varsity "Al" at the Union foot-
ball smoker this evening.
1Laynsford played his second year
on the Varsity this season, and has
twice won his -M." H1is first year,
Ratynsford was used as a lineman,
playing both guard and tackle. This
season he wcas used as a tackle early
in the season and finish edr the year at
left end.
Raynsford's election comes as a sur-
pr"ise to the campus, according to those
whio have followed the fortunes of the
1 9:13 Varsity carefully, as Ernest F
1Hughitt, '151'A, was deemed .to_ be the
logical choice for the captaincy. Hugh-
itt, who has also won his "Ml" twice,
played at half during the major por-
tion of the 1912 season, and this year
gfneraled the team from the quarter-

FIVE HUNDRED TO'
PLAY'.BASKETBALL
Rtecord )tutmber Signs up with D~irector
Rlo we For Intert las, port
During Winter.

are traditional wjt1 the lionorary or-

ganiZatjkins.
Miclhigapw4,
Barristers aind
sentiment last
among thorn,
Professor A.

Triangles,

Griffins,

Druis eCNPXess d this
]Right as prevalent
H, Lloyd, oat the non-

of Men wwho receive the'
sjgbia for their service,
is believed, according to
not epecially because they
ither the Cornell or Penn-
ttles, appears elsewhere.
if 29 men who will receive
Isignia of the reserves, folh-

tne

FIRST PRACTICES IN IVFEUER
Five hundred men will participate
in the interclass basketball activities
if dependence can be place4 on the
nuimber of men whQ have signed up
for the indoor" sport with "Intramural
Director Rowe. With such a large
number of men ready to engage in the
popular indoor sport, plans are being
made to start the',season as early as
possible, and with this in view, a meet-
ing of basketball men will be called
some time noxt week.
D~irector Rowe, announces that the
first practices «vill be held about De-
cember first. Jlugging from.. the numnber
of aspirants who have signed already,
at. least 16 or 18 teams will be repre-
sented in the interclass champion-
shp.This means that the facilities
at Waterman gymntaisum will be to-
tally inadequate to care for the prac-
tice of the entire dumber of teams as
formerly. It is understpoo1, however,
the Y. 1M. 0. A. cou~rt oan be secured,
so that all of the quintets will be pro-
'ided for.
Because of the fact that a large
nuimber of stildents are uiiablle to Vre-
turn hotme CGri tmas, Director Rowe
plans to hove several teams ii} the
field duffing this perio~d to provide
some means of entertainment for those
who remain in Ann :Arbor. These will
probably be pick-tqp teams and the
games will have Tpp bearing on the
championshlip,
An in1novation has been slpggested
concernling the placing of a faculty
team in the league. This would attract
consideraible interest and would lend
added zest to-many of the contest.
Several former stars are enrolled in
the faculty and Director Rowe stated.
that in his opinion a fast' team cold
be organb~ed,

T es in, Be ltley, M~ead, Ba tiana, AN"t
Bis, Millard, Staatz, AMC~all, Copln,
Cohn, Crossman, Davidson, Dorrance,
Gri wN~old, Jenks, McDonald, A Iy er
Peterson, Reiinnlsn, Rosa, Tuttle, War-
ner, WVells, ood, Diehl, INforse,Roehn<'
l3enton, 01n4 Qiail,
OR1ATORICA L M4SOClITION 0)J5o
HEAR JACOBJ1I H6)OFI IIAY
Xoted NDew York Slhon'tWorker to
FSp1eal IBefore University A< ndiofce
onl II 1Work
Jacob August Rile, the famous Phil-
anthropist, will speak before the Ora-
torical association ini University Hall
on Friday night. This lecture, one of
'the strongest on the programn, will be
on "Mly Neiglbor."
:1r. Riis is well known ats the author
of many books dealing with slum life,
His activities as a sluma worker have
resulted in the tearing dowit of the
Muberry B3end tenement houses and
inl replacing themr by a park. In Is
fight for decency in the slums, Mr.
Iis has been greatly' aided by Theo-
dore Roosevelt who describes him as
'"the mtost useful citizen Iin New York."
Mr. 1 iis is known as an eloquent
1speaker with ao message. The lecture
will start promptly at 8:00 o'clock.
trA'lIlI COM E rOM l eAARTO
W1ITN'ESS P1ENN'S IDE FE AT.
E+ast, west,_ south and north sent
their quota of "old grads" to witness
thei football battle staged on Ferry
field last Saturday. Sitting !in their of-
lives many miles from Anu Arboy
these former icehig;an men once more
felt their blood tingle with suppressed
emcitemnent as the hour for the ap-
l)roaching struggle drew near.. MNany
responded to the call by leaving press-
inlg businiess engagemlents and to jour-
ney hundreds of miles to chefr their
Alma Mater on to victory.
Among- those registered at Alumpni
11all were the namles of Gov. Ferris,
; 1eg~nts . 1U. Swayer, '84, and
W,1illiam (omstoclk, ' Ralph Craig,
'11; ;Pred Lawton, '11; C., Trible, '13
lemient Quinn, '13; and many others.

athletic committee, met the society
representatives last week. He suggest-
ed that all honorary society dances
ought to close at midnight, that a bet-
ter class of music should be provided,
tand a" reorganiiration of, the chaperone
system might be made. To consider
this matter Patrick Koontz,'14, was in-
structed to appoint a committee, which
is to report the matter at the next
meeting of the non-athletic committee.
The meeting will probably be held;
next week.
According to stattements made last
night, it remaimns to the joint comnmit .
tees of the students and , n-nthletic
committee to, decide whether this will
apply to all dances conducted in Ann
Arbor' for students.
NOTEI GERMAN' t'i~If VRIN
11)1!4 ESS B3FO~l{} '1IIE S,
D~r, Ludig FuljIa S.peaks on IProhlen!s
f rnrontlng GVrnia ns in
.;m~ser.
"It r. quire s the greatest effort to
retfjin Germa~n ideals in America"
said Dr. L:udwig Fuld , the eminent
German writer, in his lecture on "Die
Deutschep in Amerllka ein Kultur
problem." fttrda~y night, '"When a
German cpomes to this country, his
diifiulties arealmost unsurmounta t
ble in Is effort to retain his individ-.
utility."
"Political and practical necessities
demfand thait the German must learn
English; so he must be bilingual. It
is impossible to be absolutely bilin-
gual, because the instinct for one lan-
guage is lost as one acquilres another.
The result is a mixture of both."
The noted author and* lecturer set
forth four remedies as .the effective
solution of the difficulties of the Ger-
mans in America. He referred to the
German theatre,. church, verein and
literature.
Dr. Fulda was very much impressed
with the vigorous athletic life at Mich-t
igan. In general, he thinks that .
American universities are the equal of
German universities.
EX-V1OVERNOR OF KANSAIS

bol.
The gymnasiums are being cleared
of their apparatus, and 'huge piles of
"free" tobacco and 500 gallons of sweet
cider have been received. A majority,
of the tickets have been sold, but the
remaining pasteboards are on sale at
the Union desk today. No tickets will
be sold at the door.
Senator Charles E. Townsend of
Jackson, and Judge Robert F. Thorn-
son, ';93L, of Canandaigua, N. Y., will
be the principal speakers, Judge
Thomson is known-to the student body,
by his appearance at the post-season
smoker in 1911, Mr. Frank P. Graves.
of Chicago and President Harry B.
Hlutchins will be unable to be pres-
ent. Karl Mohn, '13-'1,'dl~ will repre-
sent the student biody, Coach Yost has
left for tle sokuth itnd will be unable
to _hresent the "Al" certificates as was
~ iltyla, kned. by tlhe athletic asso-
cia. ~Qn. A reesentt1ve will be
chosen tOday, tprobaJhly brn ,the fac-
ulty.
ThUe dpqrs af Barbour gymnasium

will be opon. at (~:00, o'clock tonight
for the crowd to gather anid to receive
toba~cQ, Pipe ,. andc souvenir cups. The
doors of ACaterini ngym will aopen at
7:3~0: o'clock and the program will be-
gi4A at. 8 00 o'clock, Bleacher seats are
being erected to accommodate 1,509,
an~d chAirs will be provided for the
other , The formal program will be
pt'eceded by band music.
Cartoou§ will be. thrown on the
screen by Lyndon. About 20 drawings
have been submitted in the prize con-
test, and will be judged, today by a
cermittee consisting of Prof. H. R.
Cross, Mr. Raymond Everett and Li-
brarian Theodore Koch.
.Edward Sayer, ,13-'15L, general chair-
man, 4ras requested all members of
the committee to be present at the
gymnasiums whenever possible today.
The services of all members of the
committee are needed.
SOCCER TEAMS WILL PLAY
EXHIBITION GAME SA1TURDA1Y
Second Game of Season Scheduled
With State Normal College
For .Nov'ember 29.
With more than thirty men out for
daily practice, the Michigan soccer
team is rapidly rounding into shape
for the second game of the season,
with the Michigan State Normal Col-
lege, a week from Saturday at F~j'.
field.

TWO BEST FRESHMEN

James B. Craig, '14E, left halfback
of the Michigan football team, has
been chosen as the recipient of the
H-eston-Schulz trophy donated to the
most valuable member of the Varsity
eleven.'
In compliance with the terms of do-
nation, Coach Yost, Assistant Coach
Schulz and Trainer Farrell submitted
respective lists, e~ach ranking four
players ini order. The lists read:
1. Hughitt, Craig, Paterson, Mus-
ser.
?. Craig, Hughitt, Paterson, Ponti-
Lis,
3. Craig, Hughitt, ,Lyons, Pontius.
According to the ranking of points,
Craig -led with 11, Hughitt followed
with 10, and Paterson, Pontius, Lyons
and Musser followed with four, two,
two and one points respectively.
The Heston-Schulz trophy is the do-
nation of Hluston Brothers.
Along the same lines, Maultietsch
and Nieman have been picked as the
two most valuable mien to the 1914
All-Fresh eleven by a committee com-
posed of Coach Douglas, G.C. Eldredge,
and T. H. Tapping. The men will re-
ceive gifts of blankets from Harry
Bird.
RITIER AND DU~tECT'OR OF
OPERA WRKIN ON PLANS
Melton and St. John 1Meet in JDetr'oit to,
Perfect D~etails~ of Union
Production.
W. Ray Melton, '13, writer of the
1914 Union opera, andi Bert St. John,I,
direct of every Union opera and who,
will continue in the same capacity this
year, are working together in Detroit
with the end in view of perfecting thei
past years many details h.ave had to
be changed after Mr. St. ,T- !n came outI
to Ann Arbor to take charge, It isi
hoped by the preseat arrangement toI,
avoid this dilffctulty.
Cornpetllionr for the opera poster,
wyill be openeth in the near future.
Prizes £pr the best design submitted,j
as well as for second and third choic-
es,, wilt be awarded as in past years.
' t AN MEDICS TO PLAY
FOR LAST SET OF -NUiERALS'

SELC RIAS
BEST COG IN TEAM
Star Halfback Picked as M1ost Valuale
Player-Gets iReston -Schulz
Trophy Cup .

CHOSENO'

rive revelers arrested Saturday
in connection with the Pennsy
celebration, including three unv
students, pleaded "not guilty" ts
charge of making and inciting a
turbance on the public streets. E
of $250 for eagh were furnished
the men will be brought to trial
urday morning, at 9:00 o'clock, I
same court.
The authorities are said to be
asidering changing the tharne t
of rioting, which is a felony pu
able with a term In state's pt
against those who were arraigned
others who are known to have t
'a leading part in the demnstrati
alleged lawlessness.
The university authorities will
no disciplinary measures until th
suit of, the prosecution by the st
known, President Harry B. Hut
refused to make a statement for
lication yesterday.' Dean M ortim
Cooley, of the engineering depart
admitted "that 'presumably the'
procedure which, is usual in cam4
this kind, will be followed,-thaj
to suspend faculty action} until th
it authorities hnave brought the tri
a conclusion.",
From the faculty and represet
students alike, the sentiment of ut
disapproval and disgust for Satu:
night's mpelee is unanimous,
,it is a disgrace to the urive
and the state," said Dean Coo ley,
even a great vitory like the one
Penn on Saturday cannot serve a
excuse for lawlessness."
While the spirit of condemnnatic
the whole affair "is strong, there
many who think that the rioting mx
have been averted if an organzed
ebration had been-scheduled.
"Are did not think It within,
province to provide; for a celebrat
stated Selden S. Dickinson, presi
of the Union, "but we would havel
glad to do it, if it had been bro
to our attention soon enough,-a
think it would have warded off:
disgraceful scenes down town"
The student council, which is b
criticised for not arranging a
celebration, is not without its defe
"We are mighty sorry it happen
said acting president Cyril Qin:
that body, "but we did all we cc
We discussed a ;sane, organized e
bration, but we thought that Pa:
field,-where the cap night festiv
are held, really the only avail
place, was too far from the campe
attract a crowd. We issued a p
warning to students through
"Michigan aly, against such nca
so th ey could nt plead ignora
Through our solicitation, the salt
closed their doors before 8:00 ol
We went down town personally,
urday night, and worked to stop
mob,-and in many Instances y
successful."
FIRE REAKS OUT IN NEW.
ACACIA HOUSE; LOSS sue
A small fire, of unknown.,or
broke out in the new Acaniafraten
house about 9:00 o'clock last.. A
but was put out before any s r
damage occurred. Members, of
Beta Theta Pi fraternity notie
small blaze in front of an incomn
ed grate, in one of the first floor rqg
Breaking through the front whind
they kept the blaze under control
ti the fire department arrived anid
tinguished the flames, which had;~
edl a foothold °between the floor lio
and tho baseet ceiinag.

SIX \N tEID TiO COMI TTEE
B Y CVLRMA' CLUB OFFICER
The membership committee of the
Deutscher Verein has been appointed
by Vice- Presiden t Gertrude Helmecke
of the society. It consists of the Miss-
es. Gertrude Bogenrieder, '14, Grace I.
Marquedant, '15, and Marguerite Haag,
'15, and L. M. Wright, '16, and Richard
L. Thorsch, '16. The vice-president
is the chairman of the committee as
provided by the constitution.
Two committees will be appointed
on the annual play within the next
week. One will be in charge of the
literary side of the performance, andc
the other on the business mapnage-
ment.
Fooball Gatrgoyle IsPrtn 'plr
Sale of he football number. of. the
Gargoyle hiave alzreacy e~ceeded these
of the first issue of the year. by 20.
Of the 1,000 copies of the fr.eshma
nunmber which were printed, 800 Afgur<
ed as the tot,,0 sale. x,$0O0 copies of
thre football pumnher were printed, of
which 1,000 hiaye been iapo.5ed o~f jo
the public uip to the present djate aknd
it is expected that the remaliing part
of the month will increase this sale.

PAYS VISIT TO T"iVERSITY Two game; 1v Vlayed oUer t~
the fall, .ft Ypslr~ti coeo
Ex-governor Hoch of Kans s s er t I t9.q, lut by the time 0 t~e nie t.
yesterday in Ann Arbor. visiting. the 'cotest Director. R4o expects~ to Dave
university. With a' Kansa~spath the AIichig ln teAm tinlspe to sow.
had been* ?kttegding the, meeting of thnethe tachersa. fetf p it about the
National As Rciatiqn of Amaiican Upi- g#nne. ntil 'ecq tly, most of the time
versit~es io yashington and is visitingwa spent in tochig the. now min
many colleges a n tniveryrities on the dlibblzrg, bu~thng a l lck~i g. Now,
way= beck to Kansds. )di ever., Di'etEtor Rowe,, aided bit sev=
__________- 1 lftjAeigVA stayrs, has taken iup active
1I(O3E'IiaI! NSNCRIPTIO-NS, AI1W vOV-kf drilling the uien on the finer
°0::PhLAVEIQ IN 41 MI 1h14{)points of' team nplay.,
-.The teatm hs been exetrewely for-
An exhibition pf Latin i1scrlption i unate in haviyg as r nucleuts, several
ha just bl_ i placed inl the bnasement Ioreig n university teams.
of the? emorial building. t is of ex- 13y' way pf aiding with the finishing
ceptiona~li nterest in that it sbhohs that, chtldhood., and who have starred on
some of, the pr-ipcip~L1methiods of cam-.' melNvwho ,ave played the game since
paigpllg for electiolns, pow in vogue, ~ca the Varsity football team has
were used severl aitlho1 s~tds ofPt a agreed to play an exhibition game with
ago, 'the five inscriptions are fad- the socceirists Saturday at Ferry fteld
simile reproductions of election notices and ani interesting contest wiill unz
from the walls, of angcient Pompeii. doubktedly resn lt.

Senior fits and soph medics will
flgbt it out this afternoon on South
Ferry field to determine which team,
will receive numerals in class football.
Four sets, of figures are to be given
out rind' already the senior engineers,
senior laws, and junior medics have{
won the right to three of the sets.
Dispose of Unsold Pennsy Programs.
Demand for the Pennsy souvenir
programs has bee'n very heavy, and the
sales exceed last year's by about 3,000.
The remaining 600 will be sold Tues-
day and Wednesd-ly t a reduced price.
The editionwor which Edward Haislip,
'VIs business manager, has been
very well received and has aroused
mutich favorable comment.

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