100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

.

1

vuicn

gan

jai

.P.W

0

IV. No. 4(

0.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FlDAY,, NOVEMBER 14, 1913.

PRICE FIVE (

..

ICHRAN WILL
PLAY IN PLACE

ROUSING SEND-OFF
GIVEN PENN TEAM

,

NOTED AUTHOR TO9
SPEAK TOMORROW
IDr. Ludwig Fulda, Eminent German
Writer Will Talk at
:00 O'clock.

F TRAPHAGEN

Further Injury to Crippled Leg of
Varsity Guard Yesterday
Causes Decision
of Coach,
BUSilNELIL IS PLACED UPON
LIST OF PUNTING ARTISTS

t's "Finishing School" I'ts
Into Shape For Final
Battle Tomorrow.

Team

Royce A. Traphagen, Varsity guard,
will not be in the lineup when the
,first whistle blows for the Penn bat-
tle on Ferry field Saturday, according
to an announcement by Coach Yost.
A further injury to Traphagen's al-
ready crippled leg during the secret
practice yesterday led the coach to
make this decision. Cochran, the best
lineman in the squad of substitutes,
will play In his place against the
Quakers.
Coach Yost does not believe that the
loss of Traphagen will seriously harm
the Varsity line. The big guard was
greatly slowed up in the Cornell game
by his injured leg, while Cochran did
good work when he supplanted him.
The Ferry field practice ground re-
solved itself into a "finished school"
for football players yesterday, when
Yost commenced his polishing-off
process in preparation for the Pennsy
battle. The coach put his men through
two hours of the hardest kind of work
and ended up with a semi-scrimmage
in which the scrubs used the Quaker
forward pass formations in attempts
to pierce the Wolverine defense.
Yost's "finishing school" included
practice in punting, tackling and
blocking and every man on the squad
received a goodly share of attention
from the large staff of coaches now in
Ann Arbor. It was the kind of prac-
tice which Yost annually prescribes
fo'r his Varsity,-the drill which tops
off a long season and which is intend-
ed to remedy any minor defects which
may have escaped notice.
Aside from the drilling in defense
against the Penn formations, the most
important part of yesterday after-
noon's practice consisted of tackling
under. punts. Several times in the
Cornell battle Craig, Lyons and some
of the other Michigan men were guil-
ty of overrunning the man with the
ball and it was to remedy this defect
that the coach spent a great deal of
his time. The Quaker backs are noted
for their speed and their ability to get
away for long gains after kicks, and
the blocking of these possible gains is
the aim of Yost.
In the punting drill Bushnell was
added to the list of kickers who lined
up for nearly a half hour's work.
Craig, Hughitt, Quinn and Catlett were
the other men who booted the ball
and Galt was one of those stationed
down the field to receive the boots.
Galt's work thus far in receiving punts
has been above the average, especial-
ly in view of the fact that in many
of the plays he has been practically
unassisted. The coach figures that
his ability to successfully elude the;
Quaker ends will have a great deal;
to do with the Michigan success on1
Saturday, and so kept him hard atI
work at his specialty.s
Raynsford worked at defensive full-i
back where he is expected to start onc
Saturday and Torbet had his place at
end. These men will shift when,
Michigan has the ball. James had a1
short tenure at Lyons' end while the
regular was taking a short rest. Coch-
(Continued on page 4.)

Pennsylvania students plainly show-
ed their eagerness for a victory over
the Wolverines, when practically the
entire student body assembled at the
station to give their gridiron warriors
a send-off to the Michigan game.
Classes were dismissed at 11:00
o'clock; and with this aid from the
faculty, over 5,000 students met on
the campus and marched behind the
university band, two miles to the rail-
road depot. Unable to restrain their
spirit, the crowd cheered and sang
continually, and at times broke their
line of march to perform the snake
dance. Speeches were made at the
station by Captain Young, Head Coa/
Brooke, and representatives of the
faculty.
The team did not head directly for
Ann Arbor, but is laying over until
Saturday morning at Detroit, where
they are lIfolding their final practices
on the grounds of the Country club.
REGENTS WILL
RECEIVE VOTE
ON CONFERENCE
Election BoardN Report on Conference
Return Question Will Co
to Board This
Morning
TA BULATION OF RESULTS IS
FEATURE OF COMMUMCATION
Report on Summer School and Other
Routine Matters Will Also
Come Uip.
The report of the election board
which canvassed the recent campus
vote on the Conference question will
be the feature of the session of the
Michigan Board of Regents which
will open its regular November meet-
ing in the board room in the law build-
ing this morning.
The report of this board, consisting
of Registrar A. G. Hall, Maurice Toul-
me and Maurice Myers, is now in the
handse of Secretary Shirley Smith
and will be presented by him to the
Regents. The report is but a formal
summing up of the results of the vote
taken on the campus and among the
alumni and is in the nature of a peti-
tion expressing the sentiment of Mich-
igan men on the question of a return
to the Intercollegiate Conference.
The report of the summer school,
recommending an increase in salaries
to professors -and junior professors
for summer wrk will not be present-
ed. Several literary degrees will be
granted. Further detailed construc-
tion plans, for the new science build-
ing, will probably be offered by ar-
chitect Kuhn of Detroit.
SOUVENIR PROGRAMS WILL
BE PUT ON SALE THIS NOON

Dr. Ludwig Fulda, the noted Ger-
man author, will lecture on "Die
Deutschen in Amerika, ein Kultur-
problem" at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow
evening in room B of the law building.
The lecture will be open to the public.
Doctor Fulda is known throughout
the continent of Europe as a poet,
playwright, translator and lecturer.
He is the author of more than 30
books, most of which are used as text
and reference books in the principal
universities and libraries throughout
the world. Many of his plays are be-
ing produced in Europe.
In speaking of the German notable,
Prof. Max Winkler, of the German de-
partment, said: "Fulda is without
doubt one of the most brilliant lec-
turers in Europe. His lecture will
certainly be valuable to students in-
terested in German culture."
Prof. Warren W. Florer, of the same
department, declared at a recent lec-
ture on the diction of Fulda: "As a
speaker, Fulda uses the purest diction,
tainted with a brilliancy seldom sur-
pased by any modern writer. The
main object of the German-American
alliance in bringing him over, is to
promote a better understanding be-
tween this country and Germany."
Doctor Fulda comes to this country
on a three week lecture tour. He has
already visited most of the eastern
educational centers where he has
been delivering lectures on the various
phases of German and American life.
GOVERNOR FERRIS
TO ATTEND DINNER
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris will
attend the banquet tendered Congress-
man Samuel L. Beakes, '83L, at 6:30
o'clock tonight in the New Armory.
More than 600 members of the Dem-
ocratic party will join in welcoming
Mr. Beakes at his first public appear-
ance since his return from Washing-
ton.
John B. Helm, '14L, and Harold S.
Hulbert, '14M, who were officers in
the Wilson club, have been invited.
Students going to the armory direct-
ly after the mass meeting will be in
time to hear the principal speakers,
TICKETS FOR UNION DANCE
SATURDAY HAVE RAPID SALE
Only 40 tickets remain out of the
300 that were put on sale yesterday
for the Penn game dance in Waterman
gym Saturday night. At 5:00 o'clock
the lobby of the Union was filled with
members waiting to purchase tickets,
and over 200 were gpne before every-
one had been waited on. All mem-
bers who desire to attend the dance
are urged to procure their tickets
early today.
Rooting Song Pleases Band Manager.
"Michigan's Men of Steel," is the
title of the new rooting song by Roy
D. Welch, '09, which is to be intro-
duced at the mass meeting tonight.
Mr. Welch, who wrote the music for
Culture and Michigenda, has present-
ed the new song to the Alumni associ-
ation.
Yesterday Mr. Welch played over
the new music for S. J. Hoexter, man-
ager of the band. Hoexter express-
ed his approval saying, "It is very
snappy, has the right swing, and will
make a good march and field song. i

LECTURE

is OPEN To

PUBLIC.

FIVE WILL RUN IN
BIG EASTERN RACE
Captain Brown, Fox, Tralfa, Shap-
ero, Young and either Watt or Terry
will represent Michigan in the big
cross country run in New York, Nov.
22. Watt has a "con" to work off
before the team leaves. If he fails,
Terry will make the trip in his place.
Five of the six men who make the
trip will compete, the sixth going as
an alternate. If Watt is successful in
working off his condition, the alternate
will be Young, otherwise Terry.
A dispatch from New York states
that although Harvard is the favorite
for the big grind, the entrance of
Michigan has given a new aspect to
the matter. The dispatch also says
that although nothing is known defi-
nitely of the Wolverines, "the well
known ability of the westerners to
develop distance runners is recog-
nized, which places a dark horse in
the field."
The squad covered a four mile jog
yesterday afternoon, with a shorter
two mile workout slated for today. A
layoff usually precedes a race, but as
the meet Saturday morning with the
Detroit Y. M. C. A. is recognized as
a practice event, Director Rowe has
decided to put the men through their
paces as usual.
A map of the Van Courtland Park
course has been received at the local
camp. The biggest obstacle seems to
be a three-eights of a mile hill at a
14 per cent grade. A portion of the
course is through the Giant's polo
grounds, Director Rowe wanted to
cover a six mile course in Saturday's,
race the same as the team will be com-
pelled to do in the east, but the De-
troit contingent objected.
LAUDS MICHIGAN'S
.1
That Micigan is to be complimented
upon its efficient law department, was
the summary of an investigation con-
ducted during the past two days by
Professor Joseph Redlich of Austria,
who lectured Wednesday to the stu-
dents with a treatise on the general
subject of law.
The noted Austrian stands preem-
inent in his field, and has been select-
ed by the Carnegie Foundation to com-
pile an exhaustive work on the subject
of law.
"I shall visit about 12 universities,"
said Professor Redlich, "and my re-
port will be published in about a year.
Our object is to compare the various
methods used in teaching law. I have
already visited Harvard and Colum-
bia where the case system is used,
and Albany, where they use the lec-
ture system. Michigan uses the case
system primarily, and does so very
effectively. It is not my purpose to
compare the universities, but only the
methods they use."
In concluding an interview yester-
day, the professor said in parting:
"The hospitality of the faculty and
students of Michigan has impressed
me deeply; and I am sincerely iii-
debted to them."
PRES. HUTCHINS ARRIVES IN
TOWN AFTER LONG JOURNEY
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins reached
Ann Arbor late last night, in time to
preside at the meeting of the board
of regents this morning. His trains
from Washington to Buffalo were held
up by storms. He was all day yester-
day traveling from Buffalo to Detroit.

President Hutchins has been attend-
ing a meeting of the National associa-
tion. of State Universities in Wash-
ington, D. C.

25 SCRUBS MAY BE
AWARDED INSIGNIA
The scrubs performed their last du-
ties toward the development of a 1913
football eleven yesterday afternoon,
and now have nothing to do but watch
the Penn, game from the sidelines and
be measured for their "R" sweaters.
It is expected that over 25 men will
be included in the gift of sweaters and
insignia, as a partial reward for the
somewhat thankless task which is
presented to, them from the opening
of school until the week of the big
game. The complete list of the favors
has not yet been made up by Coach
Kennedy.
As in former years, the scrubs are
allowed sideline privileges if in foot-
ball uniform, and have only to present
coupon No. 11 at the gate. The coach:
wants all who are to avail themselves
of this opportunity to be at the field
house by 1:30 o'clock.
RESTRICT SALE
OF TICKETS TO
UNIONSMOKER
Only ltembers to Purchase Admission
Cards Today and Tomorrow;
Will Sell No Tickets
At Door.
WILL RESUME GENERAL SALE
A'T UNION DESK NEXT WEEK
Prof. J. 1. .Allen Chosen to Represent
Faculty; Several Cartoons
Entered.
Tickets for the annual football
smoker to be held at the gymnasiums
Tuesday, will be sold only to Michi-
gan Union members today and tomor-
row. The cards have been on general
sale since Monday, and non-Union
members will again be given an ,op-
portunity to buy tickets next Monday
and Tuesday. The present sale has
been slightly smaller than last year
at this time, but the managementex-
pects to dispose of at least 2,000 ad-
missions before Tuesday. Tickets can
be obtained only at the Union desk,
and none will be sold at the door
Tuesday night.
Prof. J. R. Allen, of the engineering
department has been chosen to rep-
resent the faculty, and Karl Mohr, '13-
'15L, will talk for the student body.
Mr. Frank P. Graves, president of the
Chicago alumni association, has prom-
ised to speak. Another alumni speak-
er is still to be chosen on account of
the absence of Judge William L. Day,
'OOL, of Cleveland, who was expected
to appear. Selden Dickinson will pre-
side, Edward Kemp, '12-'14L, will lead
the singing, and Carroll Haff, '13-'15L,
will lead the cheering. The Varsity
band and the glee and mandolin club
will take charge of the musical end
of the program.
Several drawings have been entered
in the prize cartoon contest, which
closes Monday noon. Those which
are submitted before noon today will
probably be thrown on the screen at
the mass meeting tonight. Prizes of
$5.00, $3.00 and $1.00 are offered, and
the committee expects to have at least
25 sketches before the end of the con-
test.
The arrangement committee, under
the chairmanship of Henry Parsons,
'15E, has provided for bleacher seats

to accommodate nearly 1,500, and
chairs will be provided for the others.
To avoid. the usual crowding, "lanes"
(Continued on page 4.)

Organ Recital at 7: lO'clock, Wi
Precede Regular Program;
Earl Moore Will
Play Chimes.
ROY D. WELCH, FORMER OPERA
COMPOSER, OFFERS NEW SON
Pennsylvania Asked to Send Manag
as Representative. President
Hutchins May Talk.
Help win for Michigan!
Every Michigan man is expected I
turn out at the mass meeting, to b
held in Hill auditorium at 7:45 o'cloc
tonight, and lend his lungs ]o t
Hawaiian war-cry, which, it is hope
will incite the Varsity to victory, I
the game with Penn tomorrow. T
committee was unable to reach Pres
ident Harry B. Hutchins at a late hou
last night, but it is hoped that he ma
yet be secured as a speaker.
H. Beach Carpenter, '14, will 'pre
side over the meeting. Albert CFletch
er, '14E, chairman of the committe
has written the student manager
the Penn team, requesting his pres
ence at the meeting. No answer ha
as yet, been received, but it is thoug
that the Quakers will be represente
Harold Titus, '11, will also speak.
Earl Moore, '12, . will repeat the or
gan number, which was so well receh
ed at the Convocation. Moore will als
conduct a song rehearsal, which wil
start at 7:1 o'clock. This rehear
is to review Michigan songs, and'i
troduce two new ones. One of thei'
ter was written by Roy Dickenso
Welsh, of the School of Music; th
other, entitled "Poor Pennsy," an
written to the air of "Horse Trot," i
the composition of Lew David, 14
Edward Kemp will lead the singing.
The entire band will be present, an
"Hap" Haff will be on hand to direc
the yells.
TO SEND GIFT TO MISSION
OF GRADUATE AT BUSRA
A Christmas box for -the Michiga
graduates stationed at the Michiga
industrial and medical mission in Bus
rah, Arabia, is being prepared at th
University Y. M. C. A., and will b
forwarded November 18. This ,grou
of misisonaries includes Charles I
Shaw, '11E, and Mrs. Shaw, Dr. H..C
Van Vlack, '10M, and Mrs. Van Vlac
Dr. Arthur Bennett, '04M, and IMrs
Bennett, '07M, Miss Minnie Holzhaum
er, '13, and Philip Haynes, '11. Friend
and acquaintances of the members o
the mission are invited to write le
ters, and contribute gifts which ma
be left in care of Carl ,H. Smith, 21
S. State street or with Miss Elle
Moore at Newberry hall.
CLASS FOOTBALL HONORS TO BE
AWARDED TOMORROW MORNIN4
The campus - football 'championshl
is nearing a settlement. Tomoro
morning when the senior engineer
and the junior medics battle on Sout
Ferry field, the winner will be decla
ed the champion team of the campu:
The soph medics and the soph lit
will play off their tie game tomorro'
morning, and the winner of this cor
test will play the senior lits who wer
defeated by the senior engineers, thut
giving the winners of the secon
string teams the right to play 'the
and gain back their right to clas
numerals.

HAWAIIAN YELL
WILL GENERAl

"PEP~

up

The official football souvenir pro-
gram will be placed on sale this noon,
and before and after the mass meet-
ing at Hill auditorium tonight. A
new feature of the program is an arti-
cle on the Michigan football team, en-
titled "Twelve Years of Yost." In ad-
dition there will be individual pictures
of players, and cuts of the Michigan
and Pennsylvania teams. Pictures of
the coaches, statistics, and Michigan
songs and yells will also be contained
in the book. The price of the pro-
gram is ten cents.

I.,

%
6

OUT

TODAY

AT

00

,.,h
' <,'
{r:".
,;r

Officia.1 Souvenir Football Progrsam
Contains:---Pictures and lineup of both teams, Coaches, Statistics, and "Twelve Years of
Yost." On Sale State Street Bookstores, Mass Meeting, and on the Street.

10 CENTS

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan