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November 13, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-13

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ich igan

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LET'S START BEATING
TEAM TOMORROW NI

Vol. XXIV, No. 39.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C]

I I t I

VARSITY GETS
HARD WORKOUT
FOR BIG GAME
Te jul Piu Through 1Tv 1 )hours of
Secret Practice i) P epalraation
For Big Contest of
Season.
% 1I)Ia( QIINN, H 'IIIIT AND
(.\TUETT AILL TRY PUNT1IN'G

TICK EIS FOR PEN'S DANCE TO
(.) 0) SLE THIlS AFTER OON
Tickets for the big Penn game dance
in Barbour gym, Satu-rday night, will
be placed on sale at the Union this af-
ternoon, at 5:00 o'clock. The number
is limited to 250, the dance taking the
place of the regular weekly member-
ship dance.
The committee in charge consists of
H. C. Tallmadge, '14, Chairman;Thom-
as Wadden, '14; William Hart, '13;
HIArry Gault, '15; Olas Zewadske, '17;
and Bruce Bromley, '14. The chaper-
ones will be announced later.
Prof. M athews to Speak Sunday Night
Professor Shailer Mathews, Dean of
the Divinity School of the University
of Chicago, will be the speaker on the
Wesleyan Guild series at 7:30 o'clock
Sunday night. "Militant Idealism"
will becthe subject of his address. He
is considered one of the most promi-
nent men to appear here this season.

DISTANCE SQUAD 0
RACES SATURDAY
Cross Country Team Will Compete
With Detroiters to Prepare
For East.
VISITORS TO BRING FAST MEN.
Cross country men representing the
Detroit Y. M. C. A. will be in Ann
Arbor Saturday to furnish the Michi-
gan squad their last practice competi-
tion before thke Eastern meet, the fol-
lowing week-end. The runners will
start from Waterman gymnasium at
10:00 o'clock in the morning, and fin-
ish at the same place. The men ex-
pect to run over the four mile novice
course, out on Washtenaw avenue, and
back on Packard street.
No limit has been placed on the
number of entries from other institu-
tions, but Capt. Brown will use only

EXAMINE CLASS
BRIBERY CHARGES
Student CounciPs Investigation Fails
to Prove Tlat Votes Were
Puchased.
FIIESil LAW MEN ARE ('LEA\EI)
Investigation of the charges of brib-
ery in recent class elections, fails to
prove that money was used to pur-
chase votes, but evidence secured yes-
terday tends to prove with more cer-
tainty, that other unlawful means were
used by candidates to secure support.
The fresh law class has been entire-
ly cleared from charges brought
against it, but new facts brought to
light will make it necessary to extend

STUDENT COMMITTEE WILL
TRY TO ETFACTORY HERE
The committee recently appointed
at the mass meeting of the working
students for the betterment of condi-
.tions in the boarding houses, will co-
operate with the Ann Arbor Civic As-
sociation in an attempt, to bring a
factory to Ann Arbor. The committee
expects thus to furnish employment
to students who can work at odd hours
in the factory.
A meeting of the committee will be
called early next week, when definite
plans of the movement will be formu-
lated. The committee consists of Dr.
William Moriarty, representing the
faculty, Messrs. Horace G. Prettyman,
and C. C. Freeman, rep'resenting the
boarding houses, and Carl. Guthe and
Frank Olmstead, of the University
V. M. C. A. and Michigan Union em-
ployment bureaus, respectively.
COMEDY CLUBWI L
SELECT PLAYc SOON

PROMISE "PEP'

PROGRAM

I

DIG POW

Mcrub4 Oppose the First Siring
W ith .m Array of Penn.
.ormations.

Men I

If Michigan backers believe the
Maize and Blue will have a rompaway
withli Pennsy Saturday, Coach Field-
ing 14. Yost is not allowing his Var-
sity men to be influenced by any such
opinions. The members of the squad
realized this yesterday at the conclu-
sion of a two and one half hour drill
on Ferry field and a later session at
the club house, if the fact had not
been impressed on them previously.
While the gates were barred to
spectators Coach Yost and his corps of
assistants gave theVarsity =the stiffest
"light" practice of the season, in prep-
aration for the Quaker clash. While
a good part of the drill was confined
to passing and kicking, the entire
work was not of this nature. Consid-
erable time was spent in rehearsing
the gentle art of breaking up for-
ward plays and blocking men.
Craig, Quinn, Hughitt and Catlett
were the men for whom Coach Yost
set the task of punting. All four spent
a portion of the afternoon booting the
spirals, an it is generally accepted
that t e Wolverines will not be weak
in this department of the game on
Saturday .
When it fame to the rougher part
of the entertaium et the trusty scrubs,
serving their second from the last day
as Varsiit .Qnositinn. trotted out the
Pennsy plays as taught them, and per-
0 fmed for the benefit of thle big team.
Yhil there was no scrimmage of a
lefinite nature, the work of breaking
up the plays and blocking the men
Was not at all of the nursery variety.
T ie varsity ten were out there work-
ijg every minute.
T'he Varsity lined up as it is ex-
peted to start the big game pn Sat-
prday, and as it started against Cor-
nell, with one exception. F aynsford
appeared at left end in place of Licht-
ner, who Twill riot be ble to play
dgainst the Qqakeys. The Detroit lad
flas mgtde a hit with the coach since
Ie ha been tried at the end position,
(Cmntinued on page 4.)
FORTYMENLEFT
ON CLUB'S ROSTER
At a special meeting of the execu-
tive officers of the Glee club held yes-
terday afternoon the following 40 men
were chosen to make up the roster of
the permanent home club. This was
the final cut from the temporary club
of 60 men chosen earlier in the year.
First tenors: Kenneth Westerman, 'i.
A . 'Harteseldt, Lyle Clift, Claire
Straith, G. P. McMahon Jr., Fi. I,.
Curtis; T. M. Swayer, V. H Wels, R.
1. 'jacduff T S Barrett;t,'son ten-
ry J. lK. Gould, Geo. INoritz, Waldo
yellows, Spencer Scott, J. B. Angell,
Jr,1. 1). Cohen, WS Klein-.
stgcker, i. S. Marks, $. C .
Shaffmaster, . D:. Ettinger, H . N
Schmidt; first basses: Ge. Sutton,
(?regar Quaintance, R. V. Allmxan, Roy'
Parsons, L. N. Cunningham, E. C. Wil
f(ontinued on page 4,

SMOKER TICKETS
SELLING RAPIDLY
Nearly 200 tickets for the annual
football smoker to be held at the gym-
nasiums Tuesday have been disposed
of at the Michigan Union. The remain-
ing admission cards will soon be put
in the hands of committeemen, and
the management expects to dispose of,
nearly 2,000 bore TuesdaY. The
combined committees wil meet at the
Union at 5:15 oel ck this. afternoon
to arrange jpal details,
Six cartoons have already been sub-
nitted in the prize cartoon contest,
and nearly 25 are expected before the
close of the competition, Monday noon.
The time of the contest was extended
to Monday to allow artists to depict
the results of the Pennsylvania game
in their contr-ibutions. Those draw,
ings which, are hantded in by noon to-.
day will be uset at the. mass meeting
tomorrOw nibt. it eousd,'rr d adapt-_
able by the committ e

those who competed in the recent nov-
ice race. The Michigan team is ex-
pecting the points to be close, *as the
Detroit men made a strong showing
in a meet with the Ypsi Normalites
last Saturday..
Although tawe final list of runners to
be taken oast has not been decided,
taptin Brown is sure of all but one,
ad does iot expect. the Saturday;
match to effect any change in the or-
der, The eastern intercollegiate meet
is to le rtn in Van Courtland park,
New York City. The course laid out is
three miles in circuit, but will be
ronuded twice. The squad will leave
Ann Arbor, Thursday night, and depart
from New York Saturday night, Train-
er Farrell will have charge of the trip,
and will be the only non-combatant to
go,
The Michigan men are not expecting
to end in first place, as the records
of the Harvard team and the Cornell
teamv. better their own by a wide mar-
gin, Many of the local men are com-
peting for the first time, and lack the

the probe to other classes.'
That all possible evidence may beI
unearthed, the council investigators
have promised to keep all disclosures
secret. Witnesses will be asked to
testify before only two or three com-
mittee men, and their names will be
withheld from the rest of the council.
It is intimated by the investigators
that defeated candidates might be
called to account in some cases, but
not enough evidence has been secured
to warrant a positive statement to that
effect.
MERCHANTS ARE DECORATINR G
WINDOWS FOR PENN GAIE

The Snappiest Assembly of the Year
Will instill (winger Into the
Team and Student
Body Alike.
NEW ANI) OLD YELLS WLL
1W LED BY CARROLL HAFF
Faculty and Student Representatives
Together With Penn Man to
(Cive T)IalkS.
If a snappy program combined with
the enthusiasm of 5,000 students, on
the eve of the biggest football battle
of the year, indicates a good mass
meeting, the "pep" session to be held
tomorrow night in Hill auditorium, at
7:45 o'clock, will be the greatest "fight
instilling" assemblage held in years.
Because of the absence of President
Harry B. Hutchins from the city, it is
impossible to announce dfi-nitely at
present whether or not he will repre-
sent the faculty. R. G. Nutty, manager
of the Pennsylvania team has been
asked to give the viewpoint of the
Penn students. Frank' W. Murphy,
'14L, will represent the student body,
Earl V. Moore will preside at the or-
gan.
The band will start things moving,
and Carroll B. Haff, as cheerleader,
will keep them going. Some especial-
ly good new cartoons will be shown
by Lyndon. Pennsylvania yells, as
well as old and new Michigan battle
crys will be practiced. The new field
song will be thoroughly rehearsed.
Although the balconies will be open

State street and down town store-
keepers have already begun to deco-
rate their windows in the colors of the
two big teams which will meet Sat-
urday on Ferry field in the annual in-
tersectional classic.
Penn's Red and Blue are mingled
with the Maize and Blue in probably
a fourth of the shop windows, and
many elaborate decorations have made
their appearance.
A miniature gridiron with a Mi-chi-
gan player scoring a touchdown as he
falls across the goal in the arms of
a Quaker features a State street win-
dow.
AUSTRIAN OFFICIAL
PLEADS FOR UNITY.

With everything pointing to the fin-
al selection of the play before the end
of the week, it Is expected that re-
hearsals for the annual production of-
the Comedy club will begin the first
part of next week. The senate com-
mittee on dramatics has practically
ratified the selection of the club, and
although the name of the play has not
yet been announced, both the faculty
and the student organizations have
voted favorably on the idea of pre-
senting a strictly modern play. Lov-
ers of campus dramatics may expect to
see an up to date production staged
for the first time by a local organiza-
tion.
It is expected that the parts will be
assigned some time before next week,
and active work will begin at once, a'
the play will be staged some time be-
fore the Christmas holidays.
HONORARY PHILOSOPHICAL
SOCIETY ELECTS SIX MEN
Acolytes, the. honorary philosophi-
cal society, elected the following six
men at a meeting held Tuesday even-
ing: Karl B. Hoch, '14; Robert P.
Lane, graduate department; Renville
Wheat, '14; B, E. Kline, '14; C. H.
Becker, W. 0. Raymond. The speaker
of the evening was Professor Robert
M. WenJley.
The next meeting of the society
will be held next Tuesday evening,
when Professor Roy Sellars will speak
on "The Growth of Justice."

(0)MMUNICATTON. experience that will make them more
-__. valuable next year.
(The Michigan Daily as-umies no re-
sIponshilihity for sentiments express- TEAM
edin communIeations.) PE NB A T
Editor, The Michigan Daily-
Considerable attention is being paid MANY TRACK STARS
by the univeratty ato,rItles to con-
serve the health of the student body.
This is as it should be, One very im- If the presence of an abundance of
portant danger to health has been star track men has anything to do
overlooked, with it, the team which will represent
The ventilation of some of our pub- Pennsy on Saturday should be a fast
lic places of amusement is inade- and clever aggregation. The Quaker
quate, and a serious menace to fre- eleven, without doubt, numbers among
quenters of those places. There are its members more crack track athletes
no scientific methods of ventilation, than any university team in the coun-
and the windows and doors in some try.
of them are kept tightly closed, while Since last year, when Marshall,
1,000, 1,500, and often more men, wom- Penn's quarterback, scampered half
en and children breathe and'rebreathe the length of the field for the winning
the poisonous atmosphere for two counter, Michigan supporters have
hours and longer. Is it any wonder have suspected he might be a fair run-
that we have epidemics almost every ner. The truth of the matter is that
winter of grippe, pneumonia and kin- this same Mr. Marshall is classed ,a",a
dred diseases? Is it a wonder that ten second man on the ci n,der s, d
many students are unable to do their retitns most of his speed l .hen he'
work properly? I am not pointing dons his flat +
out any one place of' anusns ieri t - ,trsali the onl.y speed
the investi atibm for yoiirslvs. .l me an of time, re aid lue lijneup.
Smost everr lrla of ine int, e'l.y, an end and- lacGowva 4a half,
citvy, tasmor orle deketive vin- are, both grGists in spilsep shoes. On
tilkiion. T a Oglitly lesser degree, the 1 m AlJ-.Fgsh track tea m last
the. .iet.ects apply also, to many of 'year T~ly was second only to, the
our churches. The only way to ru iniarpous " ae4" l i quarter-
dy this is for, the .twieet bo y and miler. laeG9w" as a hurdler. ca I
othe ;s, t ktep a'vak from these plac-. scurry vevr. the. sticks, ia excell A
es which are so defecti:ve until t tpie.j
owners or managers niko re. m lit to. In addition tqo tlqesw the easternere
be patrp iAed. The healt of tIge. stu- als ,hav e enter and tsclle, xyla
dent body is more important than take istinguished themselve In the
transitory enjoyment of a . o at weights department. nnpson center
such a e , t s of- health amid life, and Iar is t, e are ranked with the
. B. '81 weight thiowers i the as ;.

"In most cases parliamentary ob-
struction is the result of racial con-
flict," said Professor Joseph Redlich,
the noted Austrian, in his lecture yes-,
terday afternoon before an audience
which filled the large hall in the law
building. "Small nations who achieve
certain powers by being allowed rep-
resentation in parliameatary assem-
blies, revive their iational spirit for
centuries, by abstructive. tactics in
the n, tional assembltes, whictt has
sl bct osppressed..
Contiifaing, he tracctd the history of
parliameu t ry obstruction from its in-
ceptkio at the time when the Trish be-
g tgfi ig r home rule. in the Brit-
i ps parliame4it,, to. the present time,
4And showed the analogy of that strug-
gle t thije p esent situation in Austria.
"P'rti amantary Procedure: is a form of
, stated Dr.. Re-dlich, "Made to
protect meYnbeta of society who have
heen diYided Into two Varta, and to in-
$' ' sxtice IN the minorIty, as well as
tq the- ma jority."-
in ench~stou, Prof, Redlich ex-
pres S4 the sincere hope that the Eng-
itsh language would always survive in
the JUnited States because in his opin-
Ion it effectively prevents the racial
conflicts which have arisen in Eu-
rope.

Aunnus Features Conv'ocation Speech
A reprint of President Harry B.
Hutchins' convocation address is a
feature of-the November Alumnus. The
issue also contains a resume of the
conference question as it stands at
present, and an article entitled "In-
tra-mufal Sports" by Director Floyd
A. Rowe, who discusses the needs of
such a branch of athletics and the
benefits to be derived from it. There
are also short biographical sketches
of the new faculty members of this
year, with cuts of many of them.
Senior Laws to Hold Initial Smoker..
Senior laws will hold their first
smoker at 7:00 o'clock tonight at the
Union. The entire faculty has been
invited to attend, and talks will be
given by Profs. R. E. Bunker and J.
R. Rood. Class president. R. E. Curry
will outline the plans for the coining
year. Edward Kemp will render some
vocal selections, and instrumental mu-
sic will be, fu:rnished4 by T.. E. H, Black
and HagerMaa..

to men- and women alike, the main
floor will be reserved for rooters.
BLIND ALUMNUS WRITES POEM
FOR ZIEULEIt PUBLICATION.
William D. Russell, a blind alumnus,
now residing in Ann Arbor, has con-
tributed a poem entitled "The Eternal
Feminine," which is a quiet protest
against that type of womanhood rep-
resented by Mrs. Pankhurst, to the
November number of the Matilda Zieg-
ler magazine.
This magazine is a monthly publi-
cation sent free to any blind person
in North America upon request. It is
the gift of Mrs. Ziegler, who was re-
cently granted free usage of the mails
in sending this periodical throughout
the country. Its circulation is now
9,000, it contains 60 pages and is print-
ed in tangible type.
IICHIGAN. STUDENT
GOES TO.FRONTIER
Fearing for the lives of his parents,
who reside in Mexico City, Edward
Zapata, '17, is sacrificing his educa-
tion and rushing to his home. His
father, who is a prominent politician,
is one of Huerta's advisors, and Za-
pata fears that he is either being held
a prisoner. or has been killed.
Several weeks ago correspondence
from his parents suddenly ceased. Za-
pata, after waiting some time, cabled
home, but received no answer. After
a few days' wait he again wired, but
the result of his second message was
no better than of the first. He then
made up his mind to leave Ann Arbor,
and after disposing of as many of his
personal, effects as possible, departed
last night. Zapata has not been home
for almost two years, having attended
Ann Arbor high school last winter.

........................~ .~.J-----

plllm

HOT FROM
TIHE PRESS

71

pENNSY

SPORTING

EXTRA,

THE GAME
Play by Play

COMPLETE FQ'TBALL SOVVENIR of THE YEAR

IWAT M ICH I GAN D4.'3Y'8 BIG YEL LOW EXTRAd

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