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November 11, 1913 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-11

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ie

Michigan

Daily

,=WIND, ICE ANDCOLD
MACKI\AWN 4 ND 'rOQUES

m L I

XXIV, No. 37.

ANN AftBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

_ ..

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: ,

VARSITY HOLDS
NEW PLAY DRILL
IN CLUB HOUSE
5111W, Piled Foot Deep on Gridiron,
and Biting Wind, Forces
Teanw to Take Light
indoor Workout.
ALL OF INJUREI) MEN EXPECT
TO (1T IN SATURDAY'S GAME,
Ponl tis, Lyons, Craig, Lichtner, and
Torbel, Iheel Farrell Busy, But
Reports Are Hopeful,
A large hospital list, a field piled a
foot deep in snow and swept by a cold,
biting wind, greeted Coach Yost yes-
terday afternoon when he called his
Cornell-conquerers together for the
initial drill for the Pennsy game on
Saturday.
Pontius, Lyons, Craig, Lichtner and
Torbet made up a quintet of injured
warriors, who kept Trainer Steve Far-
rell busy the most of the afternoon.
The Wolverine tackle is suffering from
a bad ankle, the cause of many a woe

OPERA LYRICS GIVEN OUT TO
ELEVEN TRYOUT COMPOSERS
Lyrics for the Union opera were giv-
en out to eleven men, at the Union
last night by General Chairman Koch,
of the 1914 opera committee. The lyr-
ics, which were given out, are substan-
tially those that will actually be used
in the opera, although it is likely somej
minor changes will be necessary. The
music that will be written for these
lyrics must be handed in on Decem-.
ber 15, at which time final judgment
will be made, and the successful writ-
ers announced.
The men who are competing are as
follows: Rowland Fixel, '14L, L. J.
Scanlan, '16L, George Bailey, '16,
Richard Lorsch, Durward Grinstead,
'14, E. B. McKinley, '16, B. A. Bartlett,
'14, Eric Kohler, '14, and A.E.Schrimpf,
'15, W. A. Diekema, '14, as well as a
number of those- above, have been
working on the music for some time.
The object in opening the competi-
tion again this fall, was because of the
fact that so few appeared last spring,
and because the committee wanted to
make sure that everybody had a fair
chance.
DISTANCE MEN TO
RUN IN BIG MEET
Cross Country Team of Five Men Will
Run in Fall Intercollegiate
In New York City.
RUN SCHEDULED NOVEMBER 22.

ALL-FRESH ROLL
UP 255 POINTS
TO OPPOSING 7

Opponents
During1

Only Score Seven Tallies
Season, While Verdants

RECORD CROWD
INDICATED BY
SALE OF SEATS
All of 15,282 Reservations for Penn
Game, Sold Out; With Fair
Weather, Crowd Will
Number 22,000.
$2,00 WILL BE RETURNEI) TO
OUT OF TOWN TICKET SEEKERS
Field to Be Covered With Hay After
Snow is Removed to Insure
Its Good Condition.

Pile Up More Than Point
a Minute Total.
?XCELLANT 0SH WTING OF TEAM
PRESAGES GOOD 1914 VARSITY.
Season Will Be Officially Closed in
Few Days, By Awarding
of Class Numerals.

to the Michigan doctor. Craig's bad
leg is causing the star some worry, al-
though the trainer promises that it
will by no means keep him out of the
Pennsy game.
Lyons nursed an injury for the first
time this year. He limped into the
field house yesterday afternoon and
did not go to the trouble of putting
on his moleskins,but watched the coach
and players in his citizen's clothes.
Lichtner is still in a bad shape as a
result of his injured side, while Tor-
bet has not yet recovered from the
hurt to his shoulder. He came through
the Cornell battle in fair shape and
assured th coach yesterday that he
will be able to deliver in the Penn
game.
Yost took one long look at the
weather yesterday afternoon and then
mournfully led the way to the second
floor of the field house. There he il-
lustrated some of his new plays,-the
ones he intends springing on the east-
erners on Ferry field Saturday,-and
gave the Varsity the best drill possible
under the conditions.
Coach Kennedy was not so kind to
the scrubs. He packed them into their
suits-also mackinaws, gloves and
tcques,-and led them forth to a par-
tially cleared place back of the base-
ball diamond. Here the reserves
plowed about in the snow and cold
preparing for their reception, tomor-
row, of the Pennsy formation which
Assistant Coach King Cole will give
them. Cole was present at the Penn-
sylvania-Dartmouth battle on Franklin
field last Saturday and he is expected
to have lots to tell the scrubs.
PHARMIC STUDENT
DIES AT HOSPITAL
Charles A. Dillon, '15P, of East Taw-
as, Michigan, died at the University
hospital at 11:00 o'clock, Sunday
morning, from tubercular spinal men-
ingitis. He had been ill three weeks
and had been confined to his rooming
house, 435 East University avenue,
about week preceding his removal to
the hospital two weeks ago. He was
delirious during most of his illness.
Dillon attended Albion college last
yar and was a member of the Delta
Tau Delta fraternity there. He was
pledged to the Phi Delta Chi, a phar-
mic fraternity, at Michigan. He was
active in athletics, having pitched on
the Albion baseball team. His death
is believed to be the indirect result of
a blow on the head, received in a bas-
ketball game about two years ago.
He was 20 years old, the son of Mr.
James E. Dillon. Past Grand Master
Mason of Michigan. Both the father
and mother have been in Ann Arbor
since the beginning of his illness. The
body was taken to East Tawas for
burial yesterday morning.

A cross country team composed of
Tralfa, Fox, Brown, Shapero, and
Young, with Terry as alternate, will
be sent to the annual *astern inter-
collegiate cross country run at Van
Courtland park, New York, on Novem-
ber '22.
This announcement has been made
to the cross country men as a result of
the excellent showing made in Satur-
day's handicap meet. Though Carrol,
a freshman, ran the cours-e in 40 min-
utes, 22 seconds, he is not eligible to
compete, and Tralfa leads the eligible
men with a mark 'of 41 minutes 22 sec-
onds. The other records run down to
42 minutes, 13 seconds. Considering
the fact that the course measures sev-
en and one quarter miles, according to
county maps, instead of the supposed
six miles, this showing is considered
extremely creditable.
While the Michigan team will not
have a show of winning the event, be-
cause many of the eastern teams are
composed of well-known runners, it is
nevertheless believed that the Wol-
verine overland speeders will give a
good account of themselves.
Training for the intercollegiate run
began yesterday end will be kept up
until the eve of the trip in spite of
weather conditions.
SENIOR LITS DISCONTINUE
CUSTOM OF CARRYING CANES
Senior lits, at their meeting yester-
lay afternoon, disposed of the cane
problem for the present, at least, by
declaring against the continuance of
he custom by an 18 to 17 vote. To
provide for a substitute for the canes,
a motion was made and carried to ap-
point a committee to investigate the
various customs in other universities
and to report its findings for final de-
cision. The sentiment was that by
adopting canes as a memorial, it show-
ed an imitation of eastern schools
customs.
Pres. Waldo Fellows announced the
membership invitation committee,
which has charge of the commence-
ment invitations: Karl B. Hoch, chair-
man, Renville Wheat, Robert White,
George Caron, Grace McDonald, Irma
Hogadone, and Sophie Hermann.
Arrangements have been made to
bring several prominent automobile
men to Ann Arbor to speak before
the class in motor construction. How-
ard Coffin, of the Hudson Company, an
alumnus, will be one of the first
speakers. An invitation has been re-
ceived from the Lozier Automobile
Company requesting the forty-one
members of the class to be the com-
pany's guests in Detroit this semester.]

Rolling up more than a point a min- If fair skies greet the football en-
ute in five games, against the best of thusiasts on Saturday next, the largest
the state college elevens, Michigan's I crowd that has ever seen a Wolverine
All-Fresh football team has finished team in action, will pass through the
one of the most successful seasons gates of Ferry field when Michigan
since the establishment of an eleven meets Penn. All of the 15,282 reserv-
for first year men. ed seats for the big contest have been
The University of Detroit, which tal- disposed of, and tonight Director Bar-
lied seven points, was the only team telme will begin to return more than
to score on the yearlings, while the $2,000 to out of town ticket seekers,
freshmen rolled up 255 points against whose demands could not be satisfied.
their opponents. The youngsters av-
eraged 51 points a game, but as sever- The Michigan -Pennsylvania battle
al of the contests were played with of 1910 drew more than 19,000 people.
shortened periods, the freshmen came and Director Bartelme declared yes-
well above the point a minute class. terday afternoon, that, with fair
The only All-Fresh team which weather, this year's crowd will number
bears comparison with this season's more than 22,000.
aggregation, is that which represented The athletic association has taken
this year's senior class in the fall of great precaution to prevent any ticket
1910. Paterson, Craig, Pontius, Tor- scalping, and has allowed only a lim-
bet, Allmendinger, Traphagen, Quinn, ited number* of seats to each buyer.
and Bentley, of this year's Varsity, as Only certified alumni were given more
well as Boyle, Meek, Garrells ar t than the regular quota, and this on the
Barton were members of that team. provision that they were bonafide pur-
The 1910 youngsters also rolled up a chasers.
point a minute and had but one touch-! The unprecedented demand for tick-
down scored against them. ets is not limited to Ann Arbor and
While .Coach Douglas has had sev- its vicinity. More than 500 tickets
eral stars as a nucleus, he deserves no have been sent to Pennsylvania and
small share of the credit for turning New York State. The record for dis-
out a winning team. For the last two tance, however, is held by one alumni
years the fortunes. of the All-Fresh in Lewistcn, Me. Omaha, Neb. runs
have been rather uncertain at best, and this record a close second. Tickets7
the excellent showing of the yearlings were also sent to Louisville,Ky., Nash-1
under Douglas promises much for next ville, Tenn., and St. Louis, Mo.
year's Varsity. The snow which now covers the field
There are several men on the team will be allowed to remain until the
who measure up to Varsity caliber to- first indication of a thaw. It will then
day, and have shown their class in be removed with all speed and a cover-
the clashes between the two teams. ing of hay put in its stead. The field
Captain Maulbetsch is just the type of was covered with 'a like fall of snow1
plunging fullback necessary to a good just previous to the Minnesota gamec
Varsity, and Coach Yost ha sexpress- of 1910 and a similar treatment put
ed a favorable opinion of the young- the field in first class condition. Spec-
(Continued on page 4.) tators, therefore, will see a game un-c

GLEE CLUB WILL ANNOUNCE
FINAL SELECTIONS THURSDAY
Final tryouts for the glee club were
held last night, before a committee
composed of Bruce Bromley, '14, Her-
Sbert Wilkins, '14, and Prof. William
Howland. Forty of the sixty tryouts
will be picked for the home club, and
an announcement will be made of the
'selection Thursday. This home club
will appear at all winter concerts with
the mandolin club, and from the show-
ing made by the individual members,
the personnel of the trip club, which
will make the western tour next
spring, will be determined.
STUDENT COUNCIL WILL PLAN
PENNSY GAME CELEBRATION.
In addition to discussing tentative
plans for a celebration after the Penn-
sy game,. the student council at its
meeting tonight, will take up several
other important matters. The matters
of monthly chapel meetings for fresh-
men in the literary department, will
be discussed. The report of the flag
rush committee will be heard.
STARS RETUN TO
HELP POLISH TEAM
STARS RETURN TO HELP POLISH
TEAM
Heston, Graham, the Hammonds,
Weeks, Snow, IlIiaiger, Me-
Millan Promise to Come.
EVERY PLAYER TO HAVE TTOR.
With the Cornell game already set
down as football history, the Michigan
varsity starts this week on one of the
most systematized finishing processes]
that has been given the team in years.
Nearly a dozen old sta'rs, whose
names are almost immortal to former1
rooters, have volunteered their ser-
vices in the coaching line and will be
on hand to aid Yost and Schultz in ap-
plying the polish. Several of these
men attended the Pennsylvania-Dart-t
mouth game last Saturday, and have
brought back the entire repertoire of
Quaker plays, with which the scrubs
are to assail the Varsity.u
It has been said that Harvard's and
Yale's coaching staffs outnumbered1
their players but they will have noth-
ing on the west now for Michigan will
have an individual tutor for nearly
every man during this week's practice.r
Among the old grads expected to bec
at work this week, in addition to those
already here, are "Willie" Heston, "Oc-1
ty" Graham, "Tom" and Harry Ham-r
mond, "Bullhead" Weeks, Niel Snow,
"Pa" Henniger and "Shorty" McMil-L
!an. All of these men have kept them-f
selves thoroughly posted on the finec
points of the game, and will no doubtt
help greatly in the final polishing ofc
the Wolverine machine.t
CLUB DELEGATES TO FORMt
SOCIAL CALENDAR OF CAMPUSr
Every campus organization, club
and society, which is contemplating
holding social affairs, is requested to
send representatives to a conferenc
on social affairs, called by Prof. Alfred
H. Lloyd, chairman of the non-athlet-
ic committee, to be held in room 20
of north wing, University hall, Thurs-
day, November 13, at 4:30 o'clock. I
The object of the conference is toI
systematize the campus social caen-t
Jar. Letters announcing the meetin
have been sent to presidents of the
various campus organizations con-
cerned, but representation will not be
limited to these alone, and every soci-E

°ty is expected to send a delegate.
whether notified or not.t
WEATHER INTERFERES WITH t
SOCCER; CHINESE TEAM OUT9
Owing to the excessive snow of the
last few days, the devotees of soccer
have been unable to carry on any def-
inite practice and as a result the game
has sunk into temporary oblivion. As
soon as the weather permits, regular
practice will be carried on in prepara-E
tion for the scheduled games.
The team composed of Chinese stu-
dents has been putting in some hard
work and feels confident that it will
be in good condition when the whistle
blows ,for the first game.

FRIDAY TO SEE
PEP' SESSION
FOR PENN GAME
FRIDAY TO SEE "PEP" SESSION
FOR PENN GAME
Last Monster Football Asembly of
Year, in Hill Auditorium to
Generate Fighting Spirit
For Team,
BAND AND "HAP" HAFF WILL
TOUCH OFF RAFTER ROCKERS
President 11. B. Hutchins May Repre-
sent Faculty; H. Beach Car-
penter to Preside.
The last football mass meeting of
the year will be held Friday evening
in Hill auditorium, in an effort to in-
still the proper fighting spirit into the
Michigan team for the championship
intersectional battle of the year, the
following afternoon on Ferry field.
Albert C. Fletcher, '14, was delega-
ted to complete the arrangements for
the "pep" session, at the meeting of
the board of directors of the athletic
association held yesterday' afternoon.
None of the speakers have yet been
secured, but H. Beach Carpenter, '14,
of the board in control, will act 'as
chairman.
The university band will be on hand
to furnish the proper atmosphere for
the amateur fog horns, and the new
songs and yells will be thoroughly
tried out. "Hap" Haff will lead the
rafter rockers and "Eddie" Kemp will
probably have charge of the harmo-
nies.
An effort will be made to secure
President Harry 13. Hutchins to rep-
resent the faculty at the meeting,which
will begin at 7:45 o'clpck.
Lyndon will be on hand with the
lantern, and an attempt will be made
to secure some new subjects for the
alleged cartoons.
The official programs of the Penn-
sylvania game will be put on sale im-
mediately after the meeting.
PROF. ). FRIDAY TO EVALUATE
L. S. & M. S. RAIL WAY PROPERTY
Professor David Friday of the eco-
nomics department left for New York
city Saturday morning, to continue his
work of evaluating the property of the
Lake Shore railroad. Professor Fri-
day was in Pittsburg two weeks ago
where he determined the value of the
Lake Shore terminal located there,
for the minority stockholders in the
corporation. The engagement will ex-
tend over an indefinite period of time
or at least until the minority share-
holders are satisfied that no discrep-
ancy has resulted from the transfer-
rence of the property of the afore-
mentioned railroad to the New York
Central line
BAND MAKES HIT
SWhen the Michigan Varsity band
played a concert in front of the Ithaca
hotel in Ithaca, N. Y., on the dy of.
the Michigan-Cornell gridiron battle,
it created a most favorable impression
on the Cornell student body.
"We certainly hand it to Michigan'
on its band," said one of the prominent
Cornell undergraduates, while one of

the most popular of the younger Cor-
nell alumni declared that though the
Wolverines' football team might not
be quite up to the standard, the mus-
ical organization "delivered the
goods."
Later when the Michigan musicians
marched onto Percy field playing "The
Victors," and counter-marched in front
of the stands, a great wave of applause
;reeted them, and again the compli-
mrentary sentiment was heard on all
sides.
After the conclusion of the contest,
the Cornell alumnus who was skep-
ticalof the team was heard to remark,
:Well, 3ichigan has a fine band, and
I take it all back about the, football
eleven."

EARL MOORE TO USE FRIEZE
ORGAN FOR RECITAL NOV. 18.
Mr. Earl V. Moore, of the organ de-
partment of the school of music, will
begin a series of recitals on the Frieze
Memorial organ in Hill auditorium,
Tuesday, November 18. The series
will be continued on Tuesday, Decem-
ber 2, and Tuesday, December 16. The
recitals will begin at 4:15 o'clock. Af-
ter the holidays announcements will
be made for further dates.
Since the convocation exercises, at
which Mr. Moore showed the great
posibilities of the superb organ, there
has-been a feeling on the campus that
recitals would be appreciated by the
student body, and for this reason the
series of programs have been plan-
ned.

marred by a wet, heavy gridiron.
BASEBALL R'§ TO BE GIVEN
TO FIFTEEN MEN EACH YEAR
Baseball R's will hereafter be given
to the fifteen players who,. in the opin-
ion of the coach, are of the most val-
ue to the team exclusive of the M men.
according to action taken by the board
of directors of the athletic association..
at a meeting held yesterday afternoon
Such action has been under con-
sideration for some time, the move
having been made in an effort
to equalize conditions in the major
sports. Track men are given the A.
M. A. insignia, and football candidates
who fail to make their M are granted
an R, but until now the baseball can-
didates have received no recognition
unless they won the Varsity letter.

J. FRED LAW TON 'It A LA DE
VINCI, WRITES NEW SONG
J. Fred Lawton, '11, erstwhile gen- publication of modernity and holds a
ius of our cosmopolitan campus, co- tender spot in the hearts of the delv-
i. ers into literature.
'author of Culture, Koanzaland, Crim- The copies of the song have not come
son Chest and Varsity, modest wearer from the press, but they will appear
of honorary insignia, poet, athlete, in Ann Arbor in a short time. The
lyricist, orator and humorist, has again song is being published by Buck and
burst the encompassing bonds of semi- Lowney, so named from their push and
oblivion and stepped into the blinding sweetness, and they have placed num-
glare of the calcium. He has again Brous song hits before the music mad
hearkened to the seductive beckonings public. But if mere song writers can
of Calliope and waded to friendly produce musical strains to fit poetical
fame. words of such merit that they are call-
He has outorpheused Orpheus. His: ed mere hits, then the production o
latest production of musical merit is our "Freddy" ought indeed be placed
entitled "Laddie" and dedicated to on the score card of fame as a homer
Gene Stratton Porter, author of the with the bags crowded. Watch for it,
book after which the song is named. The local demand will 'be satisfied
Said book brings more sheckels to the by Mrs. Root at the University Music
coffers of its publisher than any other House.

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