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November 05, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-05

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I

IA' 1,11, 11,1l) IT.

he

Mmewichi Ct-H

Daily

VOTE YOUR COV2ICTI
TODAY. THEY WILL CO

_..I '

1

Vol. XXIV, No. 32.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, \VLDN)SDA1, NO1M3 , 193.

PRICE F

_
- - t ,.

CORNELL'S GAME
MUSSED UP BY,
VARSITY TEAM
Torwf rtetiatri Couinled on to Add
(Greaat Str eig'tIi to Wo1Verine's
Open Style of
Attack.
St'RI 3S USE ITIIACAN PL AYS
A(\AINST FIRST SQU'A D EN
Pee ii ihir Syraense Defensc E maibled
Old Army Guame to lain
Last Saturday,

OP1'CHARGE AGAINST COBURN.
Suslended Sentence (Given in ('ase of
31ichigain Graduate.
Aldo M. Coburn, '12L, of Coopers-
yile, who was arrested a few days ago
charged with passing bad checks on
L. . Cushing, the State street drug-
gist, was released on a suspended sen-
tenCe in the circuit court yesterday
morning upon the recommendation of
Prosecutor George J. FBurke.
Prosecutor Burke stated that upon
investigation of the case, he had found
that Coburn was addicted to the use o
cocaine drugs, having contracted the
habit while a student in the dental de-
partmient. He came here for the M.
A. C. game and at the time of his ar-
rest offered Mr. Cushing payment for
the checks, which was refused.
Judge Kinne said that there was a
reasonable doubt as to Coburn's intent.
to conmiit the crime char,-ed and re-
leased him on a suspended sentence.
Men Are Named IFo┬░' Mandolin Club
The following men have been select-
ed to represent the Mandolin club in
the home concerts: Russell Mills,
Bruce Miles, Chailes McClellan, Charl-
es Kendrick, George Curry, Bertil Lar-
sen, Fritz Bade, Merle Bennett, Slier-
wood Field, Francis DuBois, Thomas9
Miller, Ralph Conger, A. C. Williams,
V. A. Warrick, W. Ogden Johnson,
Frank Wheeler, Gerald Strong. This
number will be reduced at the time of
the spring trip.t
-TO SPUR TEAM -

HEAVY VOTING CONTINUES

ON CONFERENCE QUESTION

Votes numbering more than 1,000
were registered in the second day of
the Conference vote yesterday. The
total for the first two days of the vote
has nearly reached 2,000, and it is be-;
sieved by those in charge that nearly
all students who have not already vot-
ed will participate in the final polling
today.
Among yesterday's votes there were
few mistakes, the rules having been
carefully followed in nearly all cases.
Although most of the ballots were by
students, a representative number of
faculty men tallied their opinions. Al-
so many alumni took advantage of the

balloting.
AItheughli the vote was especially
heavy at the athletic association where
students were standing in line for
reats to t.e lPennsylvania game, a rep-
resentative vote was cast in all of the
ballot boxes on the campus. The vote
was heavy from the women of the uni-
versity and from the junior class a
large vote was recorded.
Among the alumni association votes
received( yesterday are the following:
Seattle, Wlashin gton ; Gary, Indiana;
Fort Wayc. Indiana ;Charlvoix,
Sich Esanaba, Mich. Bufalo, New
X ork, Ashtahbla, Ohio; and manistie,
Alich.

Varsity parctice yesterday wa
largely given over to development o
a system of defense for the Corne
formation, as illustrated by the scrub
Coach Kennedy's men walked throug
the plays taught them by "rermany
Schultz, who witnessed the Harvard
Cornell game Saturday, while Yost in
structed his pupils in the proper meth
od of mussing up the attack of th
easterners.
A long signal drill, with Torbet a
full, followed the demonstration of th
Cornell formations. The Varsity line
up the same as in the Syracuse en
counter, with the exception of full
back and right tackle. Scholastic du
ties prevented Musser being present a
yesterday's session, and Raynsford ap
peared between Lichtner and Trap
hagen. Torbet's return to the lineu
is expected to greatly strengthen th
Wolverines in the open play style o
attack, v hich showed to such ba
advantage against Syracuse. Accord
ing to Yost there were three reason
in addition to Torbet's absence wh
Michigan's forward passes failed, bu
these same three reasons also mad
the "old army game" so successful foi
Michigan.
"On.defense Syracuse played thre
backs so far behind the line of scrim-
mage that they failed to be of any us
in backing up the line," said the coach
in discussing the Methodist game
"With the defense drawn back, Mich-
igan constantly gained at the line
plunging game, and did not need to
resort to forward passing.
"At Vanderbilt conditions were re-
versed. The Vanderbilt defense was
close to the line of scrimmage, fear-
ing our line plunging ability, and con-
sequently Michigan resorted to for-
ward passes with success, as there was
only one instead of three men playing
back. A team's tactics on offense
necessarily depends on the system of
offense its, opponents adopts."
* * * * * * * * * * /
* VOTE ON CONFERIENVE QUES
* TION.
* Voters: Students, faculty, and *
* alumni. Each allowed one
* vote. *
* Questiom:"We petition the Mich- *
* igan Regents for an immedi- *
* ate return to the Conference, *
* under the present Conferenice *
* rules." *
* Vote: Unqualified, "yes" or "no." *
* Method: Students: sign name *
* and class on back of athletic *
* coupon number 35.
* Faculty and Alumi: Any sign- *
* ed form. *
* Time: Monday, Tuesday, and *
* Wednesday, November 3,4, and *
* 5, 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m. *
Places: Ballot boxes will be lo-
* cated as follows: Michigan *
* Union, athletic association of- *
flice, Waterman and Barbour *
* gymnasiums, University hall, *
* Engineering building (2), Law *
" building (2), Economics build- *
* ing, General library, Chemical *
* building, Medic building, Den- *
* tal building. *
* Judges: Maurice .Myers,. anti- *
*' conference; Maurice Toulme, *
* pro-conference; Dr. A.G. Hall, *
* mediator. *

as I
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DOUGLAS DRIVES ALL FRESH
New Plays Are (ive n to Yearlings in
Prepara1ion of .lma ame.
Coach Douglas gave his charges sev-
eral new plays yesterday and in addi-
tion drove his men through the hard-
est practice of the season.
In past games the youngsters have
had such easy going they have failed
to play at their best. The interference
especially has been exceedingly rag-
ged in practice, and Coach Douglas is
spending no little time in correcting
this fault.
Douglas reprimanded his squad se-
verely in yesterday's practice, pointing
out that the coming Alma game would
be far different from the previous con-
tests, and intimating that any individ-
ual "soldiering" this week would re-
sult in an immediate shift in the line-
up. There are several men on the
squad who have not had 'much of a
chance in the earlier games, although
they have worked hard all season, and
the coach would have no difficulty in
filling vacancies on his team.
J jAts to Hold First Party Saturday..
J lits hold their first informal dance
at Barbour gym Saturday afternoon
at 3:00 o'clock. Lyle F. Harirs, chair-.
man of the social committee, announc-
ed the party at the meeting of the
class yesterday. W. Thom was elected
oratorical delegate. The class plans
to hold a larger number of dinners
than in pervious years, sacrificing sev-
eral dances.
MANY ROOTERS
MAKE TRI.P TO,
CORNELL CAMP

BOARDING HOUSES ANTI-CONFERENCE
GIVE SQUARE DEAL MEN IN BIG RALLY
That the agitation among the work- Fiftean hundred anti-conference men
ing students in the university would gathered on State street last might and
affect only a few of the boarding hous- ma rched around the campus behind a
es in Ann Arbor has been shown by I-rum or s and a squad of torch bear-
the declarations made by the propri- ers. At the head of the procession
etors of the representative places. All was carried a huge banner which bore
are in favor of giving the students a the watchword of the party, "We. Vote
square deal, and keeping their kitch- No'"r
ens as sanitary as they ought to. All The procession was alnost two
S blocks long, six men marching abreast
claim that none of their waiters have and as they passed through the streets,

MEAGER

li

11

NECESSITATE
ONTINUEDS-
Three Hundred Dollars Still Ne
to Send Full-Sized Band
to Ithcan's
Battlefield.
WO EN'S AID ENLISTEI DIN
SECOND DAY'S UAiWPA
Many Generous Contributions
Received In Spite of Smna11
Aggregate.
Send the band to help the tean
The $390 turned in as a resul
yesterday's canvass of the campus
forced the committee in charge to
tend the campaign another day.
Three hundred dollars is still n
ed before the full-sized band o:
pieces can be sent down to the I
ban battlefield. The ready respc
which the tags met with yester
augured well for the success of
project, and the'small returns cam
a disappointment to those intereste
the team and its success.
Because of the interest shown
the 1,500 women in the university,
portunity will be given them to b
part of the expense of the band t
Five hundred tags were sent out
night to be distributed among
women, and from inquiries made
terday it seems very probable
most of them will be disposed of.
In spite of the small number of t
sold yesterday, contributions were
ceedingly liberal. Many fifty
tags were sold, two of them being
en by women. Several went for a
lar and one enthusiastic supporte
the law department refused cha
for a two dollar bill from a surpr
tag seller.
MANY PENN ROOTERS TO SEE
ANNUAL GRIDIRON STRU4

ON FOR BATTLE
WITH ITHACANS

been compelled to work more than I
three hours for board, and the general ,
health and standard of the working
students have been good.
"No one ought to work more than
an hour for a meal," said Mr. H-race;

they chanted the slogan which they
wear upon printed tags. Their line
of march was illuminated by red fire
and ended at the corner of State street
and North Iniversity avenue.
Here they gathered in the street and
cheered while an oil soaked figure,

womitster 1Demon strmt ion tu lic
'rliirsdayI E iening~ IV len
i.1mad Le avesFor
Tj11w Ilawt.

Held

BAN.)PLANS TO HE OUT TO
All) IN THE SPIRIT-MA1{l N~

G. Prettyman. "This is not fair. I bearin1, the words, "The Conference,"
am heartily in sympathy with any was swung from a wire and burned in
effigy. After the figure had fallen to
movement which aims to look after the ground the men were addressed by
the health, the time and the standard Maurice Meyers, their unofficial leader
of the university work of the student- who asked them to refrain from any
waiters. Our experience with the disorder after they had dispersed. He
boys has been most pleasant. Mrs. also asked that they be as steadfast in
Prettyiman and myself eat with the 'their convictions and voting as they
boys, and they get nothing but the were in their demonstration and after
best in the house. Out of the 15 wait- a short talk by Railroad Jack, the
ers here last year, only one received crowd dispersed without rowdyism.

Largest Contingent in History of
Eastern Gaines Expected to
Follow Fortunes of
M1aize and Blue.
J[ONEY FOR FARES STO BE
'1TRNE D IN THIS MORNINIG.

oj";ap' ifaff Will Lead the Cheerming in
F"in aI Send -Oft ()Gatlierimig
Far The TeaIm.
- Michigan sends another football
team into the east for a big game on
- hostile ground, and Michigan men are
offered another opportunity to spur
their representatives on to their ut-
termost efforts. The team will leave
Thursday night, at 9:30 o'clock from
the Michigan Central depot, and plans
are taking form to give the players
a send-off that will be a goad to vic-
tory against the Cornellians.
It is practically assured that the
band will be out on this occasion to
add their quota to the spirit-making,
and with the background of a thousand
or so loud-voiced rooters, the purpose
of the evening should be effected. Some
talk has arisen concerning the un-
willingness of the band to turn out at
such times unless they were to receive
the trip to the big football game each
year. But even if the instigators of
the "send the band" movement fail,
and the band is forced to remain at
home, they will probably be out in
force for the Thursday night leave-
taking.
"Hap" Haff will be down with the
team to organize the cheering, and
show off the vocal efforts of the crowd
to the best advantage. It has seemed
to follow in the past that the Michi-
gan teams fight best when they are
charged heaviest with the spirit of
their college mates. This is the lead-
ing chance for the loyal element of the
university to help make sure of a
Michigan victory over the Red team.
Hoal ('ib ll Charge o tmion Dance.
Special decorations for the Saturday
evening Union dance are being plan-
ned by the Michigan union Boat club,
which has charge of the affair. The
ticket sale, which starts today, is lim-
ited to 100. Tickets today will be sold
to Boat club members only, the sale
being open to regular Union members
Thursday evening at 5:00 o'clock. Pro-
fessor and Mrs. J. E. Reighard and
Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Bradley will chap-
erone the party. Admission is 75
cents.

a condition in university work."
"I object to the statement made
about the unsanitary conditions in the
boarding houses," said Mr. C. C. Free-
man, because no discrimination was
made between the good and bad ones.
We generally make our boys work two
and a half hours; and they are fed
as well as in their own homes. The

HISTORY CLASSES DECIDE TO
VOTE ON HONOR SYSTEM.
English history classes were asked
yesterday morning to consider the ad-
visability of adopting the honor sys-
tem for examinations. Prof. E. R.
Turner Iresented' the salient points

waiters eat with the guests; and the in favor of the system, and requested
dish-washers have a table of their own the members of the classes to be pre-
in the kitchen, and are treated just pared to discuss the question during
the same as the waiters." the lecture hour tomorrow morning.
Mrs. L. M. Wuerth declared yester- After the discussion a vote will be
day that the students working in her taken.
boarding house are served just as well Last year the honor system was
as the boarders, and no complaints used by all of P'of. Turner's classes
have ever been made. Mrs. E. F. Low- with good results. This year it is plan-
ry stated that she furnishes her wait- ned to adopt a system similar to the
ers with a special room; and they are] one used last year. In case the mem-
served before the guests.. The working bers of the classes vote favorably, then
time in both places never exceeds the history students will be asked to
three hours a day. sign a pledge stating that they will
"The boys eat with us at the same not receive any help in examinations,
table," said Mrs. M. E. Walker, "They and that, they will report any person
have plenty to eat and plenty of time that they see taking help.
to eat, and they work three hours for ------ ------
the three meals they have." Educational Clif) Rears Pro.. Friday.
"The working time in our house av- "University Training and Democ-
erages three hours a day," declared racy," was the subject on which Pro--
Mrs. Viola McCain when interviewed. fessor David Friday, of the economics
"We let our waiters eat with the department, spoke at the meeting of
guests." the Educational club last evening.
Several other boarding house keep- Professor Frederick S. Breed, of the
ers were interviewed yesterday. In Jeducational department, is scheduled

Hour of Return From Ithaca Will
Allow Students to Witness
Celebrations.
if present indications are to be ac-
cepted as any criterion, the largest
delegation of rooters that every fol-
lowed the team to the east will be on
hand when the crowds assemble for
the approaching struggle with Cornell.
The committee in charge of the spe-
cial train arrangements blaim to be
making excellent progress, having al-
ready signed up more than enough
men to insure the success of the proj-
ect, and the numbers are expected to
be double by noon today.
The men who do not avail themselv-
es of the advantage offered by the spe-,
cial train will of necessity suffer the
inconvenience of either leaving Itha-
ca Saturday night at 6:30 o'clock or
remain in that city over Sunday. The
special, however, offers a medium be-
tween these two extremes by allowing
the rooters to start back Saturday
night at 10:00 o'clock, in that way
giving the men a chance to witness any
celebrations that may take place in
the evening.
The railroad authorities require that
a certain sum be in their hands by
10:00 o'clock this morning and on ac-
count of this fact it is imperative that
all who intend to make the trip on
the special train should leave the
amount of their fare at the Michigan
Union this morning. All fares will bea
collected by the committeemen whol

PHILADELPHIA, PA., Nov. 4.-The.
largest number of students that ever
took a university trip from Pennsyl-
vania is expected to be aboard the
"University of Pennsylvania Special'
when it pulls out of the Reading Ter-
minal station, Friday, November 14,
en route to Ann Arbor and the annual
Penn-Michigan giidiron battle.
The train is expected to leave at 2:00
o'clock on Friday and will arrive in
Ann Arbor Saturday morning. The
return trip will be made by way of
Niagara Falls, and the train is due to
get the Pennsylvania rooters back at
the university in time for "9 o'clocks."
Tickets for the trip have been on
sale for over a week, and according
to indications, a large and enthusiastic
Penn rooting section- will occupy seats
in the Michigan staids.
PROF. SADLER MEETS WITH
PRESIDENT IN CONFERENCE
After appearing before President
Woodrow' Wilson and presenting his
views on the La Follette seamen's bill
which is now being considered by
leading statesmen, Prof. H. C. Sadler,
of the naval architectural department,
returned to New York City yesterday
and sailed last, night on the steamer
Lusitania for Fishguard, whence he
will go to London to'attend the safety
convention which conv'enes Noveipber
12.
Prof. Sadler will be in Europe about
five weeks on this trip. In his absence
from the university his classes will be
taught by Prof. E. M. Briggs and as-.
sistant L. A. Baier.

every case, the general conditions of to speak at te next meeting of the will purchase one ticket for the entire
the kitchen were claimed to be sani- club, on. Monday, November 10. His party and issue to each man in turn,
tary, and the waiters were well-treat- subject will be "Inborn Tendencies of a receipt, which will be his passport
ed. Boys and Girls." - during the trip.

klr1lrf lil~sli~ l ~ l

V NION

ME BERSHIP

DINNE R

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

This board Will count and tab-
ulate all ballots, rejecting those
which are not in strict accord-
ance with the regulations.
A. C. H A LL, Registrar.
MAURICE MYERS, '11-'14L.
MAURtCE TOULME, '12-'14L.
* * * *, * * * * *

TONIGHT, 5:30 P. M.

Honorary Socleties

Prof. Wenbey

Prof. Durfee

Louis Hw

i11

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