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October 01, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-01

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omS.u..

Michigan

. D ly - ISOPIOMORE IHAT
UNNECESSARY
DailI_

XXIV, No. 2.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1913.

PRICE FIVE

1 I

ELEVEN.
VARSITY

* * * * * * *
RESOLUTIONS PASSE]
THE STUDENT COUN
-o-

* *
D BY
CIL

IN SCRIMMAGE
of Temporary Lineup Is Ragged;
Several New eien Will Be
Chven a Triat
Saturday.
VETERANS WITH CASE;
1,61T17 FAST TEAMEXPECTED

(1)-No hazing..
(2)-The right of appointment
of non-councilmen to council
committees.
(3)-Records of the council pro-
ceedings to be found in per-
manent form, and made acces-
sible to investigators.
(4)-Shooting of firearms in
bleachers forbidden.

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SIGNAL PR ACTICE

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'12-'13
Thurs.........396
Fri. ..... .........597
Sat. ..,,.......805
Sun............891
Mon.. .......1241
Tues...........1462
* * * * * * *

'13-'14
533
808
1151
1269
1670
1890
* *

* * * * * * * *
UNION MEMBERSHIP.
._.--

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PRES. ANGELL'

cMUCH BE

I

Lightning Stroke Hills Law,

Gradntate.

* * * * * * *

* *

Believe It Difficult
Representative
Eleven .

to Pick

3000 MEMBERS
IS NEW GOAL
SET BY UNION

Arthur Andrus, '13L., was killed at
Clare, Michigan, by a stroke of light-
ening while attending races on July 4.
COUNCIL SAYS
HAZERS WILL

Venerable President-Emeritus
Soon Be About Campus if
Nothing Unexpected
Happens.
ABILITY TO EAT MEALS IS
GREATLY Al1INC RECO
.r. Breakey Says Patient lire
Easier Than Usual
Yesterday.

Inasmuch as the temporary second
string men of the Michigan Varsity
squad triumphed over the first choice
men 3 to 0 yesterday, emphasis is giv-
en to the contention of Wolverine foot-
ball followers that few men who start
the battle against Case Saturday will
be in the game when the final whistle
ends the opening game of the Maize
and Blue schedule.
Based on the showing of the men
who participated in the rough work
yesterday, it appears that Coach Yost
has an exceedingly difficult problem
on his hands to pick a team-not an
eleyen that can defeat Case, but one
that will represent the best eleven men
for their individual positions on the
Varsity squad. This is why critics be-
lieve Yost will use nearly every man
of the Varsity squad.
The reason the second string men
defeated the first call candidates yes-
terday is not hard to fathom. The tem-
porary Varsity,-lined up Torbet, Mus-
ser, Scott, Captain Paterson, Allmen-
dinger, Pontius and Lyon, from left to
right flank, Hughitt at quarter, and
Catlett, Benton and Bentley in the
backfield,-kicked off to the second
call men. A forwad pass, Quinn to
Tessin, surprised the "regulars" and
put the ball well toward their goal
line. Two straight plays failed, and
then Bastian negotiated a place kick
for goal from the 25 yard line at a
dilicult angle, accounting for the three
points gained by the "reserves."
To account for the failure of the
,x, egulars" to score, Benton got his sig-
nals mixed on two occasions, and tried
forward passes when he was supposed
to run with the ball from forward pass
formations and there was no man
ready to receive them. Twice the first
team lost the ball through this fault
when a score seemed imminent.
Once the first team worked the leath-
er to within a half yard of the second
team's goal, only to lose it when the
necessary linebuck on the fourth down
was not forthcoming. This was due to
the excellent work of the second team
line.
'here is, however, no cause to cen-
sure the first team as a whole; rather
is there cause to commend the showing
of the second choice men who are bat-
tling, at even odds it seems, with the
"regulars." There were several faults
noticeable in the play of both elevens
but they were not glaring.
For the opening battle of the season
Saturday, Case is sending a light, fast
team to Michigan. Six veterans are
expected to participate in the game.
Case is said to be strong at the for-
ward passing game, with a fast playing
back'field. The Scientist line is said to
be weak. The lineup follows, with the
veterans marked by a star.
Left end-Boley*, or Allen;left tack-
le-Diver or Zellner; left guard-Per-
kins; center-Whelan* (captain) ;
right guard-Byers or Wertz; right
tackle-Franz* or Stanley; right end-
Kenyon*; Quarterback-Parshall*;left
half-Jenkins or Pewell*; full back--
Bronson or Mitchell; right half-Whit-
acre or Fisher.

BE PUNSE

One-Fourth of Membership Made
of Freshmen; Few Faculty
Memhers Enrolled
to Date.

Up

"OPEN IIO USE" WILL BEHELD
FRIDAY EVENING AT 7:30.
Vice-President Will Be Selected by
Board of Directors at
Next Meeting.
With the Union membership at 1,890
last night the membership committee
aims at a final roll of 3,000. Last
night's count shows an increase of 220
over Monday and 428 over the member-
ship of Tuesday night of the first week
last year.
lMoreathan one-fourth of the new
members are freshmen, representing
nearly every class proportionately to
its size. There is a marked absence
of faculty memberships but the man-
agement expects that these will come
in later as they did to a large extent
last year.
Plans for the "Open House" to be
held Friday night at 7:30 are nearly
completed and the committee hopes
that every student-whether a i ember
of the Union or not will attend. The
'reception committee will consist of
the most prominent men on the cam-
pus.
The first membership dinner will be
held Wednesday, October 15. These
dinners will be held every month as
last year. The functions were form-
erly held on Thursday evenings but
this year the time hasbeen changed to
Wednesday in accordance with the
precedent of alumni societies in vari-
ous cities which hold regular lunch-i
eons on Wednesday. Werner Schroe-
der, '14, has been appointed general,
chairman of the dinners.
George B. Duffield, '14E, who was
elected vice-president of the Union last
year is compelled to leave school and9
will be mployed this year by the De-
troit Lubricator Co. The office will be
filled at the meeting of the directors
to be held this week.
The employment and rooming bu-
reau has been busy this week and has1
a number of jobs listed. Students havel
applied for a large variety of jobs in-
cluding positions as barbers and help-c
ers in nearly all kinds of stores.
CITY, PREPARESa
FOR CONVENTION

DEVELOPMENT OF GRINDS
WILCL CRANGE FASHION
0
Zybysco chests and Sandow biceps pects to bring out a huge mob of ath-
will be the reigning mode upon the letic-mad students will be worked out
campus and with the tailors this win- on original lines.
ter. Coach Rowe, who has charge of In speaking of his plans for the fu-
intramural athletics expects highly ture, Coach Rowe said, "Every student,
visible results of this new branch of regardless of age, weight, or experi-
outdoor sports. ence will be more than welcome at
Cornell has included intramural ath- South Ferry field. It is for these stu-
letics in her general gymnastic course dents that I am here. The sixty yard
for several years and it has proven a punters, the cinder-path Mercuries and
wonderful success. The general the embryo Ty Cobbs belong on the
health of the student body soared high, varsity squads. Intramural athletics
above average and both the faculty and were introduced here for the mediocre
the student body were highly pleased and the narrow chested and they are
with the results, just the persons who should take ad-
Michigan's idea for intramural ath- vantage of this opportunity to get
letics came from Cornell but the activ- away from their stuffy rooms for an
ities through which Coach Rowe ex- hour or so each day."

Definite Stand Taken on Hazing in
First Meeting Last Night;
Any Student May
File Charges.
NON-COINCIL STUDENTS TO
BE PLACED ON CO ITTEES
Firearms Barred From Stands During
Games; to Bind Council
Records.
Definite action on hazing was taken
last night by the student council at
its first regular meeting, when it unan-
imously passed a resolution that all
students caught in the act of hazing,
will be summarily dealt with. Any
student or official of the university can
file charges with the council, and that
body will then make an immediate and
full investigation. In cases where guilt
is established, no leniency will' be
shown.
It was decided that the president of
the Council shall have the power to ap-
point the minority of any committee
from non council students. This will
make it possible to appoint captains of
the various teams, executive officers of
campus organizations and publications
or any other students, to committees
which heretofore were composed en-
tirely of councilmen. A resolution was
also passed to the effect that all rec-
ords of the council proceedings shall
be bound in permanent form. The book
will be placed in the general library
and will be made accessible to all stu-
dents *at all times.
Decided stand was also taken
against the shooting of firearms in the
bleachers at games. A motion was
passed which will make any violators
of the edict subject to immediate action
on the part of the council.
FRESHMEN LIGHT'
BUT SHOW SPEED

President-Emeritus James B. Angell
will again be about the campus this
autumn if nothing unexpected sets in
to hinder his present improving condi-
tion. Such was the verdict last night
of the attending physician, Dr. James
F. Breakey, judging the case from the
splendid improvement that was evident
all day yesterday. During the day he
breathed without the usual rasping of
the throat that has been prevalent
from the first. Dr. Angell rested well
last night, his pulse beat being prac-
tically normal, despite a slight tenden
cy of fever. «
The ability of Dr. Angell to eat his
meals and relish them is doing much
to aid him. He ate three lunches yes-
terday with apparent relish. Physi-
cians claim that his splendid constitu-
tion will pull him through, his attack
safely.
ENROLLMENT IS.
With telling strides the registration
in the lit department is exceeding all
past records, more students being reg-
istered last night than were enrolled
in the entire department the whole of
last year.
There were 2,378 students in attend-,
ance in the lit department last year,
which is 57 less than the present en-
rollment, with another day yet to be
added. A year ago at this time the
figures were 289 lower than those of
yesterday.
The graduate department enrollment
shows that last night there were 127
registered for the ensuing year, while
on the corresponding date a year ago
128 students had enrolled.
Engineers now number the enroll-
ment of that department in February
of last year.
Pharmics and homeops are holding
their own, the only decrease being In
the law department, where the regis-
tration is 45 below last year, due to
the new entrance requirements. This,
however, is not as low a figure as the
law faculty had expected.
and with nearly three weeks to whip
his men into shape Coach Douglas
should turn out a fast aggregation.
His greatest problem will be the weed-
ing out process, as there were five full
elevens working out yesterday.
While it is too early to speculate on
the make-up of the team, a number of
men have already caught the eye of the
critics. Paterson, of Detroit Central,
at end, is being touted as a comer. A
brother of "Hub" Hubel, from Menomi-
nee, has also made an impression at
quarter.
There are a number of men out who
have had experience in college foot-
ball. Pierce, a tackle from Adrian
college; Skinner, a half from South
Dakota university; DeCoudres, a tack-
le from the University of California
freshmen; and Rowan, a quarter from
the Kansas State Normal being- among
this number.

President Harry B. Hutchins, who will
deliver the address of welcome.
A concert will be given on Thursday
and Friday, October 30, 31, complimen-
tary to guests. It includes numbers
by Florence Hinkel, William Howland,
Albert Lockwood and the May festival
chorus.
Accommodations for the teachers
are guaranteed from a canvass made
last spring. Yesterday the city voted
an appropriation of $1000 for the enter-
tainment of the visitors, including the
concert, lectures and autos for trans-
portation.
IGNORING' COUNCIL'S EDICT
SOPHS HAZE MEN OF 1917.

INITIAL UNION DANCE WILL
BE GIVEN SATURDAY NIGHT.
The first regular weekly membership
dance at the Union is scheduled for
Saturday night at 9:00 o'clock. These
dances will take place every Saturday
night and will be conducted much the
same as last year. One hundred tick-
ets at 50 cents each will be placed on
sale at the Union on Thursday after-
noon at 5:00 o'clock
FACULTY MEN MAY LECTURE
TO TEACHERS OF DETROIT.
Faculty men will meet tomorrow ev-
ening in the Registrar's office, Uni-
versity hall to consider the advisabili-
ty of giving three lectures each Satur-

Nearly sixty freshmen reported to
Coach Prentis Douglas yesterday after-
noon on South Ferry field in the first
real workout for the yearlings, and al-
though the absence of beef is notice-
able on the squad, many fast men are
out.
Four games have been arranged for;
the freshmen this fall with state col-
leges, the youngsters appearing on
Ferry field the days the varsity battles
at Nashville and Ithaca. The first
game is October 18 with Hillsdale Col-
lege at Hillsdale.
The annual fray with M. A. C. fresh-
men will be played here October 25,
and the University of Detroit, at De-
troit, is scheduled for November 1.
The season closes on November 8,when
Alma college, which defeated the fresh-
Imen last year,. comes to Ann Arbor.
The schedule is a well balanced one,i

At the sixty-first annual meeting of
the Michigan State Teachers' Associa-
tion, to be held October 30, 31, and No-
vember 1, from six to eight thousand
teachers are expected Among the
speakers will be Governor W. N. Fer-
ris, Mrs. Ella Flagg Young, superin-
tendent of Chicago public schools, and

Several sophomores braved the wrath day afternoon in Detroit for the bene-
of the student council last night on fit of 820 teachers of the Detroit
Liberty street by taking six. freshmen schools who sent a petition to Presi-
under control. Egg shamoos, paint dent Harry B.Hutchins requesting that
and other conventional methods were courses of university grade be offered
used freely. . them.

I

SOME OF THE HEADLINERS
JACOB A. RIIS, of New York
NEWELL DWIGHT HILLIS
ROBERT IRVING F1ULTON O ratori
MRS. IBEL GARGUIL BEECHER t
MICHIGAN-NORTHWESTERN DEBATE 12 Big Numbers for $1.00.
RICHARD D. T. HOLLISTER
PEACE CONTEST Liberead Comrnissi

SEASON 1913-14

ical

Assocato

For Sale at Wahr's and by S

l

io n4to Studet felleis. I

1I

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