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November 01, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-01

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4 YOU

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lich igan

Dail

VOTE-BU'T FIRST ASSI
O OVRSELF OF THE FACT

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Vol. XXIV, No. 29.,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1913

PRICE FIVE CE

_____ ___ I * * * * * * * * * *

MARTIN F. HILFINGER.

MICHIGAN AND
ORANGEMEN IN
ANNUAL CLASH
I est Will Battle With East on Ferry
I0ld This lAernoon When
TIwo Teams sheet For
HIonos '
QUINN WILL PLAY AT FULL
HACK IN PLACE OF TORBET
Craig Will ,be Seen at Halfbackl-Big
Crowd Will N umber Over
East and west will clash this after-
noon on Ferry field when the elevens
of Syracuse and Michigan meet in
their annual battle for football su-
premacy.
The Orangemen of Syracuse will ar-
rive in Ann Arbor from Detroit where
they have been since yesterday morn-
ing, resting from their long trip from
the east. They will be led by their
big captain, Hilfinger, a tackle and
one of the strongest players on the
team.
Torbet, groomed by Coach Fielding
H. Yost, for the post of full back, will
not be in the game for Michigan. His
injured shoulder, hurt again in the
scrimmage of Thursday, will not al-
y low his taking part in so fierce a
clash as the battle this afternoon
promises to be. Cyril Quinn, one of
the stars of the Michigan eleven att
Vanderbilt, will play fullbck for the
Wolverines. Yost had him work-
ing at the flank during the final drill
he gave his men yesterday afternoon
behind tightly closed gates at Ferry
field.
Jimmie Craig, star halfback in 1911
and 1912, will start the game for
Michigan in his old position. He may
not be kept in the tilt all the way for
Yost is anxious to safeguard again$t
ny possible injury to his star ground
gainer. Galt will play at the half op-
rosite Craig. Yost plans to use Hugh-
itt at a defensive halfback, and will
put Galt back to guard the last lines.
Lichtner is scheduled to start at end
and will play there at offense. Q'uinn
will take his place whenever Syracuse
gets the ball and Lichtner will take
the post vacated by the fullback. Quinn
(Continued on page 4.)
CLASS RELAYS TO
BE-STAGEDYTODAY
Six or more teams, representing the
senior, sophomore and treshmen
classes of the university will run in
the annual relay races between the
halves of the Michigan-Syracuse game
today. More freshmen appeared for
the tryouts than men from any other
class. Consequently three, and possi-
bly four teams of first year men will
compete in the races. The sopho-
mores will be represented by one
team and the seniors by two. Not
enough juniors turned out for the tri-
als to warrant picking a team, but i
enough juniors report to Director
Rowe this morning, they may be al-
lowed to enter a team. The tentative
lists of teams follows:
Seniors, Team 1. Plummer; Griest;
fleinze; and Bair. Team 2. Larsen;
Williams; Glenny; Shippel.
Sophomores, Team 1. Harold

Smith; Murphy; Little; Schulkin;
?<arnell1.
Freshmen, Team 1. Corbin; Hunt-
ington; Otter; Brown. Team 2.
Smith; Mead; Wheeler; Harbert.
Team 3. Zigler; Birmingham;Schein-
man; Purkholder.
Pres. I iitcl.his N aes IRepreseiiaties
Prof. Filibert Roth of the forestry
department and J. E. Peal, a regent
of the university, will leave about the
middle of next month. for \Vashington,
P,- C., to attend the annual session of
the Narional Conservation Congress
which will begin on November 20.
These men have been selected by
President Hutchins to represent the
unniversity.

EDITORIAL COMMENT
REGARDING HOMER HEATH.
"I did not sign the article that ap-
peared in The Michigan Daily this
morning," said Homer Heath, mana-
ger of the Michigan Union, last night.
"I am strongly in favor of Michigan
remaining out of the Conference, but
would not subscribe to that part of
the article that casts reflections upon
The Michigan Daily. I crossed out
that part when I signed the article
that was handed to me by Martin Ten
Hoor. I am unable to explain how
my signature appeared under the ar-
ticle as it came out in The Daily."
Editor's Note-The article that ap-
peared in yesterday morning's Issue
was edited and handled entirely by an
anti-Conference representative. The
management of The Daily did not see
the article until it appeared in the
column and a half that has been set
aside for the exclusive use of the an-
ti-Conference men.
WE AGREE.
President Angell at the Michigan
Union inaugural diner last June: "I
have no patience with a man who is
not able to disagree with another,
without impeaching his honesty or
motives."
We agree.
BE CAREFUL.
Do not let the issues be clouded.
Personalities are not relevant. We
talk issues.
We leave it to Mr. Allmendinger, not
the football player, (he voted for the
Conference) and to Mr. Prettyman and
Mr. Sink and Mr. MacKenzie. We leave
it to these gentlemen to deal in per-
sonalities.
The surest signs of desperation in
argument is recourse to personalities.
Mr. Stagg did not introduce the
rmeasure into the Conference asking
for fifty cent admission. It was in-
troduced by Professor Pattongill of
Michigan.
Mr. Ferry was the main contributor
to Ferry field. He gave tha grounds
and the entrance structure.
BIG VERSUS LITTLE.
Opposition usually strengthens an
organization. It builds up a common
feeling. And this is what Michigan's
opposition to the Conference has
done.
Now remove this opposition.. Get
Michigan back into the Conference.
Get all the big universities together
and all the small universities together.
(Continued on page 4.)

COMM UN ICATI ONS!
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
As the anti-Conference editor, I
wish to correct an error in the com-
munication printed yesterday. A
clause was included which attributed
a "pernicious policy" to The Daily.
That particular clause was stricken
out before the article was accepted by
me and signed by Mr. Homer Heath
Through mistake, an uncorrected copy
of the communication was sent to the
printer. I believe that the editor of
The Daily has made an honest effort
to present in a fair manner his Con-
ference policy and I regret exceeding-
ly that a statement which seemed tc
attack him personally, was publishes
through my carelessness.
MAURICE MYERS.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:--
It has been claimed that Michigan's
action in withdrawing from the Con-
ference was hasty, heated, and con-
trary to prevailing student and alumni
sentiment of the time. This is an er-
ror. The students at the time were
thoroughly posted on the issues at
stake, and the sentiment, was practi-
cally unanimous for withdrawal, A
vote taken at the time under fair con-
ditions, each student signing his name
and class, showed in two days time
over seventeen hundred for withdraw-
al and just two opposed. Under those
conditions Michigan ought to have
withdrawn, just as now she ought to
return if, when students and alumni
are thoroughly posted on the issues,
the sentiment should be so over-I
whelmingly for a. return.
It seems to us the main reason that
appeals to students for a return is the
desire for athletic contests with some
of the stronger conference schools.
But lichigan stands ready for such
contests now. Only the obnoxious, un-
dignifled, and ill-considered boycott
rule prevents. Our athletics are clean,
our teams are worthy opponents, our
sportsmanship is unquestioned, and
there is a desire for such contests not
only here but among the alumni and
students of the ,leading conference
schools as well.
We are urged to play with our "nat-
ural rivals." But Michigan's natural
rivals are not- altogether dependent
upon geographical location. Rather,
let us say, upon equal athletic ability.
But conside ring geographical location
alone, we should bear in mind the fact
that Michigan is as close to Pennsyl-
vania, Cornell, and Vanderbilt as to
(Continued on page 4.)

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SCORES FOR FIVE
flichigan
908 4

YEARS,
Syraeus
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1909
1910
1911
1912

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7
* * *

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6
18
* * *

NOT10 SUFFRAGIST CAUSES
ROW ON ORATORICAL BAR U
M embers Doubt Expediency of Secur-
ing lars. Panlkhiiiurst as Speaker
on Lecture CourSe.
A. debate threatening temporary dis-
ruption of the Oratorical Board oc-
zurred at its last meeting, when it
was proposed to attempt to secure
Mrs. Ernmmeline Pankhurst, the inter-
imational figure in the woman suffrage
movement, as an extra feature on the
Oratorical association course.
After a heated discussion, in which
the militant leader was compared with
Dr. Cook and Emma Goldman by the
one side, and with Mrs. Ella Plagg
Young by the other, the matter was left
in the hands of a committee,which will
confer with university authorities in
regard to the expediency of securing
Mrs. Pankhurst when she speaks be-
tore the Detroit Suffrage club in the
near future.
ALUMNI PROVE.
FAVORABLE T

. I

NOTABL.E MEN
NO A .ESPEAK -BEFORE
HUGE MEETINI
Foimer .nibassudor Henry Lane 1
son and Governor Wood bridge
N fer'is Are
speikers.
FA lLOUS CANADIAN EDITOR
'ALK AT EVFNINGN 3E
Sci en'I'll tn rT(eaers Prcsei1t
Fridaty Sessions of Annual
Convention.

Captain and Left Tackle of theSyra-
cuse Football Team Which Opposes
Michigan This Afternoon.
ROOUtTER S S HOW
FIGHTING PEPP

QUICK RETURN

BEFORE TEAM

3,000 Students Meet in Hill Auditorium
on Eve of Syracuise Game
to Cheer Football
Player's.
VARISITY MEN OCCUPY FRONT
SE A'IS, AT MONSTER MEETING

IPJ'(fe5' Shi nieritils ''hoip sonl
Fred Litwto. 't1, Stir Stu.
dent s to Emtlmlsiasni.

and

In a meeting last night that sur-
passed in enthusiasm the one before
the Vanderbilt send-off, 3,000 students
-ave their Wolverine football team
promise of support which bodes ill for
Syracuse's chances today.
In spite of the early hour the big
Hill auditorium was filled to the gal-
lery walls, and the necessity of giving
way to the visiting teachers at 7:15
o'clock was the only check upon the
unleashed spirits of the crowd, stirred
up by the cheerleader and the speak-
ers.
The team was there, occupying seats
in the front row. The Varsity band in
gull uniform, made its first official

WESTERN CONFERENCE QUESTION

BOX

(Editor's Note-in order to avoid any possible criticism which may
arise as to the non-partisanship of the answers given in this Question Box,
two r+Ies to each , uery will be given. One will be given by T. Hawley Tap-
ping, '11-'16L, a member of The Michigan Daily force, who will represent the
Pro-Conference side of the dispute. T he other answer will be given by an
Anti-Conference representative.
The questions should be addressed to the Question Box Editor and should
be short. The queries must be signed with the name of the author, although
upon request editors will sign the questions with the initials and class num-
erals.)

Overwhelming Sentiment of Michigan's
Graduacs Shows All Want
Re-entry as Soon as
Possible.
I)A IDS BALLOT FOR RETURN
BY VOTE OF 22 AGAINST 2,'
Women Arc Unanimously Pro-Con-
ference.. Literary Societies t
Register Opinion.
"We petition the Iliehigan regents1
for an inniediate return to the Con-
ference tindert he present Conference
ruleo. Answer an unmlaalified "yes"
or "no."
Organizations canvassed yesterday
gave a large majority of affirmativeI
votes. The Druids had but two dis-
senting ballots, officers of women's
organizations were unanimous, and
letters received from alumni organ-
izations indicated a decided pro-
Conference tendency in various parts
of the country. The results in detail
are as follows:
Druids.
Yes: Paul Blanshard, Bruce Brom-
ley, Gordon Eldredge, Waldo Fellows,
Patrick Koontz, John I. Lippincott,
Lester Rosenbaum, Harold Tallmadge.
Ernest Allmendinger, Harry Brown.
Bernus Kline, Bruce Miles,. Reuben
Peterson, Henry Rummel, Herbert
Wilkins and Leo Burnett.
No: George Caron and William Mu'e-
lendore.
'l'wo members did not vote.
Alumni.
Lucius Babcock, '00L, secretary of
the Oklahoma association, writes that
at a recent dinner the association vot-
ed a unanimous "yes."
E. P. Nutting, '02, of the association
at Moline, Illinois, writes, "I am very
strongly in favor of a return to the
Conference, as I believe the only valid
reasons for leaving are now things of
the past."
Allen McLaughlin, '10DI secretary.
of the Pontiac association says, "In a
personal canvass of 28 Michigan alum-
ni in regards to return to the Confer-
ence I had 27 vote "yes" and one vote
"no."
"Go back to the Conference uncon-
ditionally, you can make the condi-
tions- when you get there," says Leo
Kugel, '08, of Sandusky, Illinois.
Rolfe C. Spinning, '13, of Vandalia,
Illinois, says: "Please put down one
big vote for an immediate return to
(Continued on page 4.)

Seven thousand teachers were pre
out yesterday to take part in the pr
gran for the second day of the stat
teachers' convention. The differer
meetings held throughout the day wer
attended by huge crowds. A buff
dinner was served to 700 members o
the alumni association late in the a
ternoon in Barbour and Waterma
gymnasiums a was featured by
musical program.
Henry Lane Wilson, ex-ambassado
to Mexico; in his address on the "Me
ican Situation," spoke in part as fol
lows:
"The Mexican people," he said,"ar
highly individualistic and would deep
ly resent any interference on the par
of the United States. This characte
istic of the 15eople would prompt then
to extreme nmeasure merely for th
sake of defeating our policy, and th
result would be humiliation of ou
national pride. The task of assimila
tion and reorganization would be diffi
cult in the extreme, as the Spaniard
have done practically nothing for thI
natives. along educationpd or mora
lines.
"The Mexicans, 80 per ent of whon
are of Indian blood, are very treach
erous and deceitful."
Mr. Wilson thinks that Huerta di
all that could be done under the ir
cumstances, and that our governmen
did wrong in refusing to recognizi
him. The audience was so enthuslas
tic over Mr. Wilson's speech that h
spoke to them for an extra quarter o
an hour.
Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris, i
his speech last night on "Twenty-nin
Years of Educational Work in Michi
(Continued on page 4.)
ALL-FRESH MEETS
0. U, ON GRIDIRDN
Coach Douglas and his band of All
fresh warriors will leave thiĀ§ morn
ing for Detroit, where the yearling
will engage the U. of D. eleven. Th
game is regarded as the hardest on
on the All-Fresh schedule, as the De
troiters are represented by a fas
heavy team of veterans.
While the youngsters should wi
since the ,. of D. could only hold th
Ypsilanti Normals to a tie score, th
locals will have no small task to kee
their goal line uncrossed.
Cecil Skinner, who broke his a
before the first game, has been picke
by Douglas to start at left end, a
Graven is not in shape to play. Hueb4
will hold down the other extremit;
while the rest of the line will be con
posed the same as in the last tw
games.
Zieger will rattle off the plays, wit
Splawn at right half doing the pun
ing, and Captain Maulbetsch perforn
ing, at full. McNamara has the ca
over Calvin at left half, according I
the lineup announced last evening.
Coach Douglas hopes to defeat t
U. of D., which is coached by Geor
Lawton, Michigan fullback in 191
and is taking a large squad of playe
to the metropolis. The party wi
leave at 9:15 over the D. J. & C., worl
ing out on the D. A. C. grounds, whei
the game will be played, early in t
afternoon.
The All-Fresh will line up as fo
lows: C. Skinner, L.E; Finkbine
L.T.; Rehor, L.G.; Nieman, C.;
Skinner, R.G.; Cerney, R.T.; Hueb
R.E.; Zieger, Q.B.; McNamara, L.H
Maulbetsch, F.B.; Splawn, R.H.

showing since its reorganization.
Starting out with the "Victors" it
iroused the Wolverine supporters tc
ar wild enthusiasm which was main-
tained until the last echoes of the
'Yellow and Blue" ceased to rever-
berate through the vast amphitheatre
Fred Lawton, '11, the first speaker
arked back to the days of Dave Al-
erdyce, when the Wolverine fighting
spirit kept hirm in the game in spite
of a cracked collar-bone. He pleaded
for the same spirit today and for ev-
ery other day to follow, and ended
with the now famous words of Coach
Yost: \Who are they that they should
)eat a Michigan team ?"
The crowd arose to greet Professor-
Eneritus Bradley Thompson, s ho
made the famous speech after the dis-
:strous Notre Dame game in 1909. He
reminded the rooters that the "Lord
loveth whom he chasteneth," and ad-'
nonished the audience to help Provi-
lence carry out the will of the Om-"
mipotent.
The influx of the teachers put a stop
to new cheers and songs which were
being enthusiastically practiced for
the game this afternoon.

1. The Michigan Daily of January
15, 1907, expressed itself editorially
as follows: "The Daily believes thor-
3ughly that it is to the interests of
Michigan to withdraw from the Con-
Ference. We have everything to lose
ind nothing to gain by staying in a
:oalition where we were dictated to
by inferior schools." Wherein has
he situation changed in this respect
.ince that time. Philip B. Stapp, '16.
Pro: What was true six years ago
.s not true today. In half a dozen
years conditions have changed mate-
rially. The Michigan Daily of today
.annot be held responsible for the ed
'torial comment of editors who long
ago left school. Perhaps even the
man who wrote that editorial in 1907
woIld be taking the same stand today
as is the present editor of The Michi-
gan Daily, were he back in school.
Tie other question, that as to the pos-
sibility of adictation by smaller
schools of the Conference, is answer-
ed in one of the editorials in this
morning's isuse. Tapping.
Anti: Conditions now are substan-I
tially the same as they were when the
Daily urged the withdrawal. If we re-
turn we must give up our training

table. We must give up freshman
team competition. We must give up
spring football practice and all pre-
liminary training before September 20.
We must submit to "full and complete
faculty control.'" We must have our
coaches appointed "by university gov-
erning bodies on the recommendation
of the faculty or president in the reg-
ular way and at a moderate salary."
We must give up our eastern baseball
trip for the weather prevents games
there at the time we now go south and
we should be playing western schools
for the Conference championship at
the time we now play in the east. We
must give up participation in the east-
ern Intercollegiate. We must giv.e up!
our football games with Cornell and
Pennsylvania for they can be schedul-
ed only at the end of the season when
we should be playing such schools as
Wisconsin or Minnesota for the Con-
ference championship. And, finally,
we lay ourselves liable to absolute dic-
tation by any five members of the
Conference by means of the simple
.majority rule. Our Regents have 'al-
ways insisted upon and still insist up-
on unanimous consent to new legis-
lation. Myers.

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