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October 26, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-26

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"IrV

JUIDGc lENrU.I

ie

Michigan

Dal

y

WILL SHOW ITS

XXIV, No. 24.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SSUNDA Y, OCTOBER 26, 1913.

PRICE

. -

COMMODORES,
FALL BEFORE
WOLVERINES
Varsity's Consistent Use of Forward,
Pass Results in Score of Michigan
33, Vanderbilt 2; Timely
"Come Back."
STELLAR WORK OF QUINN AND
{ALT FEA TURES IN VICTORY
)ichiigan's "ood Day" Completely
Drowns Sorrowl's Resultant of
M. A. C. Battle.

* bet's go Michigan!
* Th victorious"Wolverine team *
* arrives in Ann Arbor this even- *
* ing at 6:20 over the Michigan *
* Central. Michigan has rallied *
* at the crisis of the season. Let *
* every loyal student turn out to- *
* give the Maize and Blue team an *
* old-time, rousing reception. *
* "Boys, she was a great game. *
* Vanderbilt was outplayed in ev- *
* ery department," telegraphed *
* Manager "Micky" Milligan after *
* the struggle. *
* Let's get out and show the *
* team what we think of the *
* "great game." *
* * * * * * * * * * * '

ran rampant, gaining ground around
(Special to The Michigan Daily.) the ends, through the Gold and Black
line, and over the heads of the Yellow
4ASVILylE, TENN., Oct. 2.-AtJackets with forward passes well con-
crisis of Michigan's season, the ceived and beautifully executed.
ize and Blue football team "came The only mar on Michigan's "good
k" today, and, by the score of 33 to day" was the two points Vanderbilt
gave Vanderbilt the worst drubbing gleaned through a safety. This hap-
Commodores have received since pened at the end 'of the first quarter
n McGugin took charge as coach. when, after the kickoff, Michigan was
Perfect use of the forward pass in penalized 15 yards for holding, Brown
first half, and the excellent ground blocked Quinn's punt, and forced Bas-
ning of Galt and Quinn, gave the tian, who recovered it,. back over his
lverines an early lead, and with 26 own goal line. Incidentally, this was
nts accumulated during the first as close as the Yellow Jackets came to
o periods, the Michigan team held scoring.
nderbilt safe at all stages, and in- Michigan's first score came early in
entally added another touchdown in the first quarter, when the Michigan
fourth quarter. men carried the ball down the field and
'he Commodores were out there Galt went over the line for a touch-
iting all the game, but the Wolver- down. Later the same tactics were
s had more than one game at stake, repeated and Quinn snahed over.
hey had their reputations, and all Then came the Commodo-res' safety.
ing the game the Michigan backs (Contnued on page 6.)

TEN TEAMS PLAY
IN CLASS SERIES
Class gridirons were all in use yes-
terday morning wIen ten teams fought
to gain leads in the interclass football
series. The results of the games were,
as follows:
Senior lits 6, junior lits 0.
Senior engineers 18, junior engineers
0.
Junior laws 12, fresh laws 0.
Soph lits 13, fresh lits 0.
Soph engineers 0, fresh engineers 0.
The senior-junior lit game was the
hardest fought battle of the list, the
'14 men getting their only touchdown
in the first quarter by line plunges by
Kohler, playing full, and a delayed
cross buck by Perkins at half, who
crossed the goal after a twenty yard
run. The juniors took a brace and
held their elders scoreless for the re-
maining periods.
Time saved the soph engineers from
crossing the goal line of the fresh en-
gineers,for they were plowing down the
field at a rapid pace and were only a
few yards from their mark when the
final whistle blew. Lack of teamwork
was much in evidence on both the con-
tending teams.
Tomorrow the senior laws and the
soph medics are scheduled to meet on
south Ferry field at 4:05 o'clock.
MUSIC AND STUNTS TO MAKE
UP TODAY'S BILL AT UNIONL
Music and stunts will compose the
program to begin at 3:00 o'clock this
afternoon at the Michigan Union. With
Willis A. Diekema at the piano, Ken-
neth Westerman will sing. Ralph
Conger will furnish comedy stunts and
C. Mloyer and R. Parker have promised
solos on the cornet and cello. Michi-
gan songs will constitute the remain-
der of the program.
Mr. Dallas M.Boudeman of the Mich-
igan bar will begin two series of lec-
tures tomorrow in room G of the law
building. Each series will contain ten
lectures, the first at 4:00 o'clock, on
"Statutory Construction," the second
at 5:00 o'clock on "Michigan Statutes."
CHEER CONTEST IS
BRINGING RESULTS.

CHOOSE OFFICERS
FOR FOUR CLASSES
The fresh engineer class held its
first election yesterday morning when
the following officers were chosen:
vice-president, D. J. Griffin; secretary,
11. A. Garrison; track manager, H. A.
Taylor; basketball manager, D. C.
Morgan. No majorities were obtained
for the offices of president, treasurer
and baseball manager. Another elec-
tion has been called for Tuesday after-
noon from 3:30 to 5:45 o'clock in room
311 of the new engineering building.
The fresh medic class held its elec-
tion yesterday morning and elected the
following: president, Julian B. Marks;.
vice president, Dorothy Frazer; secre-
tary, Vivian Russell; treasurer, Edwin
Ferguson; baseball manager, Paul E.
Rudemann; track manager, C. May An-
derson; basketball manager, William
S. Gonne.
The soph engineer class elected Lew-
is B. Hyde president and Richard C.
Jeter treasurer. No majorities were
received for vice-preident and secre-
tary, and another election will be held
Wednesday from 3:00 to 5:00 o'clock
in room 348 of the new engineering
building. The nominees for vice-pres-
ident are B. Woodbury and Jack Fink-,
enstaedt and for secretary, Wesley
Bintz and J. G. Milliken..
In the election of the Junior dents,
the following men were elected: treas-
urer, W. P. Gibson; baseball manager,
W. C. Melvin; basketball manager, A.
C. James and sergeant-at-arms, B. W.
Lathorpe.
HA U4IHTER OF )E AN COOLEY
MARRIE) TO LAW GRADUATE
The marriage of Miss Margaret Cool-
ey, daughter of Dean Cooley of the en-
gineering department to Mr. Harvey
Cornwell, '12L, was solemnized at the
home of the bride's parents at 1405 Hillp
str( (t at 8:00 o'clock last evening. The
Rev. Father O'Connor officiated. The
groom was attended by Mr. William
Restrick, '12L, while the bride had as
her matron of honor, her sister, Mrs.
W. O. Houston, of Jackson, Michigan.
DOCTOR FISHER TO,
TALK AT MAJESTICa

YESTRIDAY'S FOOTBALL *
: RESiLTS.
* WEST.*
* Mchigan 33, Vanderbilt 2. *
* M. A. C. 12, Wisconsin 7. *
* Purdue 0, Chicago 6. *
' Minnesota 36, North Dakota 0. *
* Illinois 10, Indiana 0. *
* Nebraska 7, Haskell Indians 6. *
* Iowa 78, Northwestern 0. *
* Oberlin 26, Case 24. *
* ' EAST. *
* Pennsylvania 7, Carlisle 7.
* University of Pittsburg 20, Cor- *
* nell 7. *
* Syracuse 36, Western Reserve 0. *
* Harvard 29, Penn. State 0. *
* Dartmouth 6, Princeton 0. *
* Navy 76, Maryland Aggies 0. *
* Army 2, Tufts 0. *
* Yale0, W. & J.0. *
* * * * * * , * * , *
ASKS FOR ALUMNI OPINION
ON CONFERENCE QUESTION.
In the Conference campaign being
conducted by The Michigan Daily, let-
ters, calling for unqualified "yes" or-
no,".were mailed yesterday to the sec-
retaries of the 113 alumni associations
of the United States. The answers will
be received before Wednesday, Novem-
her 5; and the results will be incorpor-

FROM

Yearling;S Pile Up 69 Points
the ethodist ProtestantI
itors in Snappy
Battle.
MA ULBETS CIH AT FULLBAC
STARS IN OFFENSIVI
Dougl s' Men Work Forwia
Consistently Against
Opponents
The Michigan Freshmen ra
selves ragged on the Ferry fie
iron yesterday afternoon in p
a 69 to 0 score against the elev
Adrian College. The score mig
been larger but Coach Douglas
busy putting in substitutes in
ond half that his men didn't
chance to get really started.
Maulbetsch, Splawn, and ZigE
backfield and Nieman, Rehor a
bel in the line constituted an e
dozen stars . who played rings
the collegians. Whenever the
rooters in the stands became

FRESH ELEV
SWAMPS T

:RENCE SITUATION BOILED

DOWN

ated in the petition to be presented to sistent in their cries for "Mo
the board of regents at its November the yearling captain took th
session. -raced over the goal line for
In each case the present status was down. The rest of the time
explained, and from the opinions to members of the team busied
he received from every locality, The es perpetrating all types of
Daily will be able to present the alum- passes on the luckless Adria
ni attitude in a comprehensive manner. (Contnued on page 6
WESTERN CONFERENCE QUESTION
(Editor's Note-In order to avoid any possible criticism whi
arise as to the non-partisanship of the answers given in this Ques
two replies to each query will be given. One will be given by T. Haw
ping, '11-'16L, a member of The Michigan Daily force, who will repr
Pro-Conference side of the dispute. T he other answer will be givt
Anti-Conference representative.
The questions should be addressed to the Question Box Editor an
be short. The queries must be signed with the name of the author,
upon request editors will sign the ques tions with the initials and cl
etals.)

hese differences have been formulated by The Michigan Daily after refer-
ence to the Conference Code and minutes of the Conference meetings, up
to the last meeting of June 6, 1913. The results have been thoroughly ver-
ified and no mistakes were found. The Michigan Daily stands ready to
make the necessary corrections where a mistake is proved.)
REAL I)FFERENCES ARE SET FO1jtH AS FOLLOWS:
1. Training Table, i. e. the payment by the Michigan Athletic association
the excess above $4.00 for the candidates' board.
?. Freshanan team competition, i. e. playing with teams outside their own
7titution.
3. Home rule, i. e. the Michigan Regents have demanded that the central
vernment of the Conference shall have only the powers that are expressly
legated to it by a unanimous vote of the members of the Conference.
4. Faculty Control. In the Conference universities this means that the
,ulty or the president of the university must have, at least, a veto power over
e board, which contains student or alumni representation. It is not neces-
ry that the faculty have an initiative power of legislation.
.i Appointment of Coaches. At Michigan the coaches are appointed by
Board in Control after advisement with and consent of the president of the
[versity. Under Conference rules, "No coach shall be appointed except by
university governing bodies, upon the recommendation of the faculty or
sident, in the regular way and at a moderate salary.-
6. Preliminary Training. At the Conference universities there can be no
eliminary training before September 20. Preliminary training starts at
chigan two weeks before the opening of the university session. (The uni-
-sity seldom opens before October 1.)

to
p

TO GETI BAC INTO THE CONFERENCE MICHIGAN MUST GIVE UP:
1. Local control of athletics to Conference representatives. This rests
upon the principle that nine great western universities have found it neces-
sary to combine in protecting amateur college sports, instead of leaving this
question, as has Michigan to the jurisdiction of single, isolated governing
boards.
2. Competition of fresh teams with outside institutions.
3. Training table, i. e. payment of excess over $4.00 per week by athletic
association.
4. Alumni and student control for, at least, a veto power vested some-
where in the faculty.
5. Start preliminary training on September 20, rather than two weeks be-
fore the opening of the university session.
6. Change the selection of the coaches from the Board in Control of Ath-
letics to the appointment upon the recommendation of the President or the fac-
ulty. The Michigan coaches, however, have never been appointed without the
sanction of the president.
MICIIGAN OAN 0 BACK INTO THE CONFERENCE AND HAVE:
1. Eastern relations, in track, baseball and football.
2. A seven game football schedule witti what universities she pleases..
3. Twelve baseball games with Conference teams and with no limit oil
number of outside games.
4. The present coaches and the present coaching system.
5. A definite standing in athletics at the end of the session.
A championship is always possible.,
6. Competition. with rivals that are hers by nature and distribution of
students and alumni.
7. Competition with teams that are under the same training and eligi-
bility rules.
8. Basketball reestablished.
. More track meets and more home track meets.
10. Can be host at big all western meets.
11. More frequent interchange of friendly relations between student
bodies.

That the competition for new yells
which The Michigan Daily instituted
yesterday morning bids fair to be a
success is evidenced by tle fact that
already several new cheers have been
received. Among those who have con-
tributed are C. H. Davis, '09, Harold
Schradzki, '15L, and J. R. Darnell, '16.
The meeting at which the best yells
will be chosen will be held Wednesday
afternoon, October 29, at 4:30 o'clock
in the oratory room on the third floor
of North Wing. At that time contest-
ants may appear before the committee
of judges and demonstrate their yells.
The cheers which are chosen will be
practiced for the first time at the Syr-
acuse game mass meeting which will
be held Wednesday evening, it is
thought.
Written contributions must be in
the hands of the Cheer Editor, care of
The Michigan Daily by 2:30 p. m. Wed-
nesday, October 29.

Dr. George E. Fisher of New York
city will open the series of Sunday ev-
ening meetings to be held in the Ma-
jestic theatre, under the auspices of
the University Y. M. C. A. this evening
at 6:30 o'clock. Dr. Fisher's address
will be the last of the sex hygiene
series of lectures which have been con-
ducted by the Y. M. C. A. this year.
Admisison will be by ticket until 6:25
o'clock when free admittance will be
granted to all university men. Special
music will feature the program.
The officers of the Y. M. C. A. are
planning to make the coming series
of Sunday engagements religious mass-
meetings where social service and re-
ligious problems will be discussed by
the leading speakers and reformers of
the university and of other commun-
ities. Graham Taylor and Dr. Ozora
Davis of Chicago will be heard here
within a few weeks.

1. What is the basis of determining
the eleven points as stated under,
"Michigan can go back into the Con-
ference and have" in yesterday's Dai-
ly? T. S. C. '17.
Pro. These eleven benefits were dis-
covered in the investigation carried on
by The Michigan Daily in preparing
for this campaign. They are the re-
sults of a thorough examination of the
Conference code, of interviews with
Conference men and with Michigan
alumni who have at times past inter-
ested themselves in the Michigan-Con-
ference dispute. There is a very great
possibility that there are even more
benefits to be gained by Michigan than
those enumerated by The Daily. Tap-
ping.
Anti. The benefits mentioned depend
upon one's viewpoint. For example,
eastern relations would necessarily be
much restricted if not entirely stopped.
2. If Michigan returns to the Con-
ference, must we lose Yost? H. R. S.
'15 L.
Pro. The Conference coaches in the
majority of instances are of the same
class of men as is Fielding Yost, a
teacher paid only for his work done
in training the athletic teams. The
only difference in their appointment
rests in the fact that they must be ap-
proved by a faculty control system of
athletic administration. This is not
the case at Michigan where there is no
veto or majority voting power in the,
faculty. Should Michigan g6 back to.
the Conference it is very probable that
faculty control would be put in force
here. Should Michigan's faculty ap-

prove of Fielding Yost he could n
main. Tapping.
Anti. The Conference rule is "IN
coach shall be appointed except
university governing bodies on the re
ommendation of the faculty or pre:
dent in the regular way and at a mo
erate salary."
If Yost were recommended by t
faculty or president and appointed
the committee on athletics composed
faculty men only, he would be retai
ed. All matters such as this must
subject to "full and complete facul
control."
3. What is the Intercollegiate Co
ference? HF. P. '17.
Pro. The Conference is a compa
organization of nine "western" unive
sities, Chicago, Illinois, Wiscons
Minnesota, Iowa, Purdue, Indian
Ohio State, and Northwestern, co:
bined for the purposes of athletic a
ministration. Michigan, through h
president, Dr. James B. Angell, w
primarily responsible for the princip
features of the Conference and was
leading member of the body until o:
cially banished in 1909. The Conf<
ence board makes all the rules for at
letic administration at the , vario
schools, practically complete conti
being vested in the central body. Ta
ping.
Anti. Michigan withdrew from t
Conference because it objected to su
regulations as "full and complete ft
ulty control," "no training table
training quarters," and no outsi
games for freshman teams. These, a
other objections still exist.

Presbyterian Church

Corner Huron and
Division Street

LEONARD A. BARRETT, MINISTER
10:30 A. M. Subject-Religion in Action.
12 Noon. Claeses for Stndents. Prof. W. D. Henderson will speak
to the men's class.
5:30 P. M. C. E.-Young People Invited.

h u in~in~

Union Guild
Series

n.J. Hutohins,D.D.

Congregatio.
Church

T

night

Of Oberlin College

7:45 P

U

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