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October 31, 1911 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1911-10-31

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Arev' ? ""
1C1I1

I

e

lly

A Reliable Directory of
Reliable Business

/

ANN ARBQR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1911.

'0ESIN'T BEAR EARMAR OF COMMENCEMENT HEADGEAR BERNET) WHEN LAMF EXP1ODES
SLEUTH OF MODE FICTION. HERALDS SOCIETY INITIATES.
* * Jesie Hobart Attenipts to Pour Aleo-
amous Detective Appears More the Wearing the tasseled head gear that 1 hol Into Hot Receptacle.
Conventional Business Man; is usually associated with. June weath- Jessie Hobart, '14, was badly burned
AVoIds Mystery. er and commencement, senior about the head and hands Saturday
-eenight when an alcohol lamp exploded.
William J. Burns, detective, doesn't women braved the chilly blasts of yes- in her room at 203 S. Thayer Street.
>ok the part. His eyes are blue and terday, thus announcing their election She was taken to the University hos-
eenly analytical but there the com- to Mortarboard. The date of the ini- pital, where it was stated last night
tiation has not been selected but it that she would recover.
arison to Sherlocks of fiction ends. will be held within the next two Miss Hobart attempted to refill the
here are no shaggy overhanging eye- weeks. Meanwhile the neophytes lamp under a chafing dish while it wEj
rows, or high cheekbones. Neither is will have to wear the "mortarboards." still hot. The lamp exploded, throw-
is hair crowded with the gray- of The following were elected: Cather-'in the burning liquid into her face.
any battles, nor the- chin abrupt ine Alexander, Josephine Davis, Moni- Dr. Darling is attending her.
om the sheer strength of underlying ca Evans, Grace Lockton, Mary Mal- This was Miss Hobart's first year in
etermination. In the pleasant round- comson, Jane Quirk, Lucile Stowe, the university. Her parents reside in
g face, the sandy mustache, slightly Marguerite Stevens, Louise Tuthill, Detroit. It is not known how long;
urled at the ends, and the open frank Helen Webber. she will be confined in the hospital.

wvera1 T
T
nage; b
-ained 1Ii
ml
de
JOB. in;
cu

; Re- manner in which he extends his hand
and his friendship, one thinks he sees
the characteristics of the man of cen-
ventional business rather than of the
4terday man who trails criminals in the inter-;
of the ests of justice. And perhaps the ex-
hard planationo f this is to be found in Mr.
to te11 Burn's own words.
towell "The man who tries to impress you
were that detective work is something mys-
ft that terious," is" the way he puts It, "is a
a who fraud, pure and simple. The man Swho
Satur- makes a success of sleuthing, is the
man who applies to the work the same
principles of common sense that would
ling to be necessary to make any other bus-
as un- ness a success."
When Mr. Burns isn't relating rem-
re un- iniscences from his long experience
;le that in the realms of crime, he speaks just
impos- as interestingly from a seemingly in-
wveling exhaustible stock of information on
iot re- almost every subject.
f fight "I believe just as thoroughly as I
to get do in my own existence," he said in
need- answer to the question, "that in the
atly in men that are being graduated from the
n that colleges of this country, lies the on-
ly solution of the question of purifica-
hies. tion of the business world of the graft
arrels, and crime and poor ethics with which
Carpel it is now saturated. It may take time
k off. but is absolutely the only direction in
s than, which we may tuvi for that soluan,"
Satur- --
mas not FIRST YEAR GIRL DIES,
s such FROM SEPTIC POISONING.
t Dr.
o take Miss Nettie Schreiner, a freshman
olutely from Canton, Ohio, died yesterday
will be morning of septic poisoning. She took
re the a cold last Thursday and rapidly grew
prain- worse. Complications arose and on
not as Saturday she was taken to Dr. Dar-
i right ling's hospital. Her parents were no-
scrim- tified and arrived in Ann Arbor Sun-
ractice day.
he Re- -_
s just Enrollment Statistics Secured Today.
The official count of all the students
enrolled in the university for the year
ead of 1911-1912 will be made today. The re-
.down suits will be turned over to Secretary
was on Smith. The complete enrollment will
. Meek be forwarded by him to Mr. Rudolph,
Wells Tombo of thc administrative board of
uarter Columbia University, who, for sever-
d Her- al years, has compiled the enrollments
illegal of about twenty-five large American
coring. universities, for publication in Science
ut was magazine. The figures this year will
e men- be given in one of the December num-
bers of that publication.
-nd to Y nnn 'r Run Ovt tr by Hack
* A~lfl'S y Hack

UNION WILL SEEK.
MORE MEMBERS.
Second House to House Can-
vass to be. Started
Friday
HOPE TO REACH EVERY STUDENT,

POLITICAL STRIFE
BREAKS ON CAMPUS'

InSurgent Element Stirs
Members o Senior
Dent Class

Up
ED.

RECENT ELECTION

PROTEST

Beginning Friday and c ntinuing Political dissension is again rife on

through Sunday the Michigan Union,
will wage a second house to house
canvass for members. Ann Arbor has
been divided into four districts and
forty-five men have been appointed to
bring the Union before every man in
the university.
"Our first campaign was far from a
failure, but we are not yet satisfied]
with the number of men in the Union,",
said President Blish last night. "I be-}
lieve that another campaign will add
a considerable number to our list.
There are hundreds of men who have
not joined the Union yet, simply be-
cause its purposes and meaning have
not been explained to them. We hope
to reach every man in this campaign,
and to put before him the Union and
its ideals."
Robert Tipping has been appointed
general chairman. A sub-chairman
will be placed over each of the four
city districts. - Ten men have been as-
signed to each sub-chairman. Every
canvasser Will be supplied with a copy
of the recent issue of the Alumnus
which was dedicated to ,the Michigan
Union, and with circulars relative to
the present club house and the one
planned for the future.
There will be a general meeting of
the committees at. the Union Thurs-
day evening from 7:30 to 9:00 o'clock
for a smoker and a discussion of plans
for the campaign. At this time Mat-
thew Blish, Homer Heath and Robert
Tipping will give short talks.
Dean Hinsdale Begins Lecture Series.
Beginning this evening Dean .Hins-
dale of the homeop department will
deliver a series of Monday evening
lectures upon subjects which will be
of interest to lay as well as profes-
sional men. The lectures will be open
to all.
American Chemical Society Meets.
The University of Michigan section
of the American Chemical Society will
meet this afternoon at 4:30 in room,
303 of the Chemical building. Dr. S.
C. Lind will read a paper on "The
Chemists' Interest in Radioactivity."

the campus. This time insurgency
has broken forth among the seniorj
dents as a result of last Saturday's
election. A petition is now being cir-
culated among the independents of
the class which, according to present1
plans, will be presented to the Student
Council in a day or two.
According to the testimony of the
rebelling members, most of them were
unable to attend the meeting at which
the nominations were made, and there-
fore did not get several of the men of
their choice up for office; in particu-
lar their presidential candidate. When
they presented their 'candidates by'
petition to the election board last
Wednesday afternoon, they were in-
formed that they were too late, the
ballots having been already printed.
This is their first ground for protest,
it being provided by the Student Coun-
cil general election rules that petitions
may be presented until Thursday. The
attention of C. I. Wood, the Student
Councilman in charge of the election,
was called to the fact that there were
candidates on petition, and under his
order the names were written out on
the ballots during the early part of
the election hours. The insurgers
,claim, however, that they were illeg-
ibly and improperly written. This is
denied by the leaders of the success-
ful faction, and countercharges of
electioneering and illegal voting are
made by them..
When seen yesterday neither the suc-
cessful nor defeated presidential can-
didate would talk in regard to the
matter, stating that they thought the
whole thing had been dropped.
"There was considerable contention
at the election," said Student Coun-
cilman Wood. "Objection was made
to those who had not paid their class
dues, but they paid their assessments
and voted. When the election was
over it was understood that everyone
was satisfied. I did not know that any
protest was being considered."
President Hutchins Visits Detroit.
President Hutchins was in Detroit
yesterday on University business. He
returned on a late train last night.

***STUay POLTI
* VARSITY FABLES.
by our own George Ade. A D
* *
* The (ink who Wears His H. S. *
* Yell.*
*es-.. * # VERNMEH
* Detec 've William Burns
* Two Fresh Men hit our Burg He Came'to Ann Arbi
* in October. One of them hadt Inte rS
* been Captain of his Prep school 0
* Football Team and had been the Politics
* Triple Cajincs of the Social $
* Swirl in Podunk. The other had . GAVE PLAIN, DIRECT ADD
* - managed to win his letter in Pe- "
* tI'n'1'. *
leg igh 'fold of His Connection with
* The Triple Cajincs like a * Well Kown Graft And
* Good Sport hocked his Prep
* School Frat Pin and discarded Detective William J. Burns
* his Football Sweater. The oth- *
* er Freshm n appeared on the * Dettandgone. The hero of co n
* campus one P. M. with his Big .* hair-haising investigations hel
* Green P on a Pink Sweater, a * uninterrupted attention of 1,500
* Ten Horse Power Pipe, and a * ale for an hour and a half in U
* Hobble Skirt. And the 'Sophs * hall last evening, his
* lence. * -Citizenship and Municipal Graft'
* * 3tituting the initial attraction fc
* That afternoon number 73, a * season on the S. L. A. course.
* '00 from our Joint, escaped from * "I am distinctly not a eture
* the Nut Bin, walked out on the 4 form speaker," said Mr. Burns,
* Camp, and saw the Other Fresh- * his introduction by President A
* -man. As if with one Clear Call * S. Loring of the S. L. A.. "It
* to Duty, he went for the Barbar- * interest you students in clean p(
* ism while the Hobble looked on * that I am here tonight. if I ca
*in Horror. *duce you college men to study p
and go out and help purify mun
* But the Triple Cajincs heard * government, I will have accompl
* her Shrieks. He covered the * my mission. Municipal graft pr
* Dist in Ten Flat. With one * the most vital problem In Am
* Sweep of his Mighty Arm he * life today, and it is that pr
* Threw the Cracked G away. * which honestddetectivesthacanr<
* Thereupon he became the Lion * solve. I really believe that p
* of the Camp, made the U Pi Dee * detectives, as. a class, are the bl
* Fraternity, was interviewed by' * lot of scoundrels who ever wen
* the Daily Reporter, and finally * hanged, but the better me of th
* eloped with the Hobble. * fession are doing good."
* * Mr. Burns' address was plai
* Moral: Conform to the Tradi- * direct. Without pretense to eloqi
tions of the Camp.* he told a forceful story of his co
* * tion with the Western land fi
* * * * * * * * * * * the San Francisco graft investig
the Seattle corruption case, an
ANNUAL PRIZES FOR Ohio legislature purification, b
ESSAYS ANNOUNCED. explaining a thrilling counterf:
entanglement in detail;
For the eighth time the firm of "While I was investigating th
Hart, Schaffner & Marx ha offered ty grafters in San Francisco,"
Mr. Burns, "about 1900 of the
cash prizes to those interested in com-
mere ad idusryforthebes std-perous business men banquete
merce and industry for the best stud- and called me the 'Savior of the
ies In the economic field. The offer is The next week I investigated so
made through a committee composed the 1900 big men; then they call
of five noted economists and business the 'blood-hound of respectabilit
men; Prof. J. Lawrence Laughlin, of policy is to get the big crook.
Chicago University, chairman; Prof. can fill your penitentiaries wit:
H. C. Adams, Michigan; Prof. J. B little fellows, and they are forg
Clark, Columbia; Prof. E. F. Gay, Har- Put a ig fellow behind the bar
yard, and Mr. Horace White of New the ensuing discussion will mak
York City.'* ple stand up and take notice wi
The prizes amount to $2,000 in all transpiring."
There are two classes of possible con-_
testants-,class B, which includes all Senior irls Will Confer on P
who are undergraduates in any Amer- Hazel Wolcott and Mary Wo
ican college, and,Class A, comprrsing have been selected to confer
any other Americans without restric- Professors I. N. Demmon and
tion. The first prize for class A is Strauss, of the English depart
$1,000, the second, $500; in class B with regard to the selection c
the prizes are $300 an, $200 respect" Senior Girls' play.
ively. The papers must be sent in
by June 1,, 1912. Union Falls to Publish Betu
The subjects suggested are taken Through a mistake in telegi
from various fields, political science, connection, the Union did not r
economics, industrial reform, and oth- football returns until late Sat
ers, and any contestant is allowed to afternoon. It had been anno
choose his own topic. that general reports would b p
The University of Michigan has been early in the afternoon. The
represented in past years among the management hopes to make ari
prize winners, and several of the the- ments by next Saturday to ha'
ses have been of high quality. turns on time.

and

ine on the possi-
because of the
lars absent from
i make no state-
at he thought of
balance of the

Albert, twelve-year-old sOn of Pro-
fessor E. C. Case, was knocked down
and run over by a hack Saturday after-
noon when returning from the Van-
derbilt game. The boy's injuries are
not considered serious. The boy was
trying to get out of the way of an au-
tomobile and jumped directly in front
of the carriage. No blame is attach-
ed to the driver.

John

ltc'IIl

r

Sellers

Thursday Night

There are many good seats le
and the program with 8
attractions is worth
several times
,$2.50
Buy that ticket today
8 NUIIBERS LE

k

Report.

Seat Reservation every day at 4 P. M.

I

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